Quiz about I Am Curious Orange
Quiz about I Am Curious Orange

I Am Curious, Orange Trivia Quiz


Are you curious about oranges, and foods and drinks that use oranges as an ingredient? If so, this is the quiz for you.

A photo quiz by Kankurette. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
Kankurette
Time
3 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
403,339
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
675
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: jrn739 (7/10), Guest 69 (6/10), Guest 203 (6/10).
photo quiz
1. This French dish would have graced many a British dinner party in the '80s. The sauce is orange, but can you guess which bird is being served here? Hint

Chicken
Goose
Quail
Duck

photo quiz
2. One French pudding involves the use of orange or tangerine zest and juice, and orange liqueur - such as Grand Marnier - as a hot topping for pancakes. What is the name of the pudding pictured here? Hint

Crêpes Solange
Crêpes Sara
Crêpes Suzette
Crêpes Sophia

photo quiz
3. Which Italian sweets, consisting of deep-fried dough balls flavoured with honey and orange, are shown here? Hint

Cannoli
Biscotti
Bomboloni
Struffoli

photo quiz
4. Feijoada is a meat and black bean stew which is customarily served with orange slices. In which South American country is it a national dish? Hint

Chile
Brazil
Ecuador
Venezuela

photo quiz
5. The cocktail depicted here is a Tequila Sunrise, which features orange juice and tequila as two of its main ingredients - but which third ingredient provides the red colouring? Hint

Raspberry cordial
Strawberryade
Cranberry juice
Grenadine

photo quiz
6. In which kind of restaurant would you be most likely to encounter orange chicken on the menu? Hint

Italian
Indian
French
Chinese

photo quiz
7. Pictured here is a British cake which consists of a spongy base topped with orange jelly and chocolate. After which type of orange is it named? Hint

Mandarin
Jaffa
Clementine
Tangerine

photo quiz
8. These jars contain orange marmalade, a type of preserve often enjoyed as part of a British breakfast. Other varieties of marmalade exist, but which of these fruits would NOT form the basis of a marmalade on its own? Hint

Lime
Strawberry
Grapefruit
Lemon

photo quiz
9. Which 'bloody' wine cocktail, popular in Spain and Portugal and served with slices of orange, is pictured here? Hint

Bellini
Kir Royale
Black Velvet
Sangria

photo quiz
10. Oranges can even be used as a flavouring for bread! This orangey bread shown here is called limpa bread, but can you guess which European country it comes from? (Hint: you could eat it on an IKEA table.) Hint

Sweden
Albania
Belgium
Poland


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. This French dish would have graced many a British dinner party in the '80s. The sauce is orange, but can you guess which bird is being served here?

Answer: Duck

The dish is, of course, duck à l'orange: roasted duck with a bigarade (bitter orange) sauce. It is one of the French dishes that Julia Child popularised in the USA in the '60s, and was also a retro classic across the pond (and one of my favourite meals as a little girl in '80s England).

However, the idea of serving a duck with orange sauce dates further back. One 19th century cookbook, 'The French Cook' by Louis Eustache Ude, features a recipe for 'ducklings à la bigarade', and oranges became popular in France as far back as the 17th century, with recipes suggesting adding orange juice to the juices of a roast duck.
2. One French pudding involves the use of orange or tangerine zest and juice, and orange liqueur - such as Grand Marnier - as a hot topping for pancakes. What is the name of the pudding pictured here?

Answer: Crêpes Suzette

It's unclear who Suzette is or how the crêpes got their name: some sources claim that Henri Charpentier, a young waiter, accidentally burned orange cordial while making pancakes for the Prince of Wales and his guests, one of whom was a French girl called Suzette, and the Prince liked the result so much that he asked for the name of the dish to be changed from Crêpes Princesse to Crêpes Suzette.

Others claim they were named after the French actress Suzanne 'Suzette' Reichenberg, who played a maid serving crêpes onstage, and the stage manager had them flambéed. Whatever the story of their name, they have been around since the 19th century at least, and consist of pancakes - or crêpes - topped with caramelised sugar, the zest and juice of an orange or tangerine, and orange liqueur.

It is customary for them to be flambéed (i.e. the alcohol is set on fire) at the table.
3. Which Italian sweets, consisting of deep-fried dough balls flavoured with honey and orange, are shown here?

Answer: Struffoli

Struffoli are originally from Naples and consist of deep-fried marble-sized dough balls, presented in a pile or a wreath shape like the ones here. They are mixed with honey, cinnamon and orange peel and decorated with sprinkles (or 'diavulilli'), though some variations use other flavourings such as lemon.

They are often served at Easter or Christmas, and are known as pignolata in Sicily and cicerchiata in Abruzzo. If you're a fan of Indian food, you might notice the similarity between struffoli and gulab jamun, a spongy cake made from milk solids, deep fried and drenched in a sugary syrup.
4. Feijoada is a meat and black bean stew which is customarily served with orange slices. In which South American country is it a national dish?

Answer: Brazil

Feijoada is enjoyed in Portuguese-speaking countries, but is most associated with Brazil, where it is considered to be a national dish. 'Feijão' is a Portuguese word for beans, and the Brazilian feijoada usually uses black beans, though some regional versions use brown or red beans depending on what is available.

It also contains various pork products, such as bacon, sausage and/or ribs, while regional versions add extra vegetables, and it is served with orange slices (not shown here) and white rice. (The oranges are said to help digestion.) Other accompaniments also include cuve (fried collard greens or kale) or farofa, made from manioc flour, which appears to be the brown substance on the plate shown here.

It is traditionally served at weekends as a leisurely lunch, and is also available as a street food.
5. The cocktail depicted here is a Tequila Sunrise, which features orange juice and tequila as two of its main ingredients - but which third ingredient provides the red colouring?

Answer: Grenadine

Orange juice is a popular flavouring for cocktails and mocktails alike, and Tequila Sunrise is originally from California, where it was created at the Trident Restaurant in Sausalito by a pair of bartenders in the early '70s. An older ('30s) version created in Phoenix, Arizona, contained tequila, creme de cassis, soda water and lime juice.

The cocktail is not mixed, in order to preserve its layers of colour: the tequila goes in first, then the ice, then the orange juice and finally the more viscous grenadine syrup, giving it the effect of a sunrise. Mick Jagger of the Rolling Stones is one of the cocktail's most famous fans, having ordered them all over the USA on the Stones' American tour of 1972. Varieties include the Florida Sunrise (which also contains pineapple juice), Red Sea Sunrise (a non-alcoholic version with lemonade instead of tequila), and Tequila Sunset (which uses dark rum or blackberry brandy instead of grenadine for a darker colour).
6. In which kind of restaurant would you be most likely to encounter orange chicken on the menu?

Answer: Chinese

Orange chicken is a staple of Chinese restaurants in the US, such as Panda Express - where it was invented in 1982 - and is similar to General Tso's chicken, a Chinese-American dish with ginger, garlic and soy sauce. It consists of deep-fried battered chicken pieces in a sweet and sour orange sauce. Fans of 'The Big Bang Theory' might recall that Sheldon is a huge fan.

Although there is a genuine Chinese dish from Hunan which combines citrus and chicken, it uses dried tangerine or orange peel, and is not as sweet as the American dish.

A similar dish with lemon sauce can also often be found in Chinese restaurants.
7. Pictured here is a British cake which consists of a spongy base topped with orange jelly and chocolate. After which type of orange is it named?

Answer: Jaffa

Jaffa Cakes are made by McVities, were introduced in 1927, and are named after the Jaffa orange, a variety of orange originating in Palestine. One way to start a Twitter argument among Brits is to ask whether Jaffa Cakes are cakes or biscuits. Apologies to the 'Jaffa Cakes are biscuits' side, but the official answer is that they are cakes; a court ruled in 1991 that they should be considered cakes for tax purposes, as in the UK, VAT is payable on chocolate-covered biscuits, but not chocolate-covered cakes.

As well as the orange flavour jelly, there are also limited edition Jaffa Cake varieties with blackcurrant, strawberry, pineapple or lemon and lime jelly (this last usually available around Halloween). Jaffa Cake bars and miniature packs are also available.
8. These jars contain orange marmalade, a type of preserve often enjoyed as part of a British breakfast. Other varieties of marmalade exist, but which of these fruits would NOT form the basis of a marmalade on its own?

Answer: Strawberry

The big difference between jam and marmalade is that marmalade exclusively uses citrus fruits (although this wasn't always the case in the past), so you wouldn't find strawberry marmalade anywhere! Marmalade also contains more water than jam, as well as bits of citrus peel.

The name comes from 'marmelo', the Latin word for quince, and the preserve itself dates back to Roman times, when quinces were boiled in honey and then left to cool and set, though the marmalade we know today originated in Scotland. Seville oranges are a popular orange of choice for making marmalade in the UK; Dundee marmalade, one regional Scottish variety, contains large chunks of Seville orange peel. Marmalade sandwiches are the signature favourite food of Paddington Bear, the ursine hero of the books by Michael Bond, who often carries them under his hat.
9. Which 'bloody' wine cocktail, popular in Spain and Portugal and served with slices of orange, is pictured here?

Answer: Sangria

Sangria - which comes from the Spanish and Portuguese word for 'bloodshed' - is a wine cocktail which originally comes from Spain and Portugal; under European Union law, only Spanish or Portuguese sangria is authentic and may be labelled as such. It is often served in tapas bars and restaurants and consists of red wine (Rioja is a popular choice), orange and lemon juice, and sometimes a little sugar and/or orange liqueur such as Cointreau. Like the sangria shown here, it is served with slices of orange, though other varieties may contain lemon or apple slices or berry fruits instead. Sangria blanca is a white wine variation, while ponche de sangria is a non-alcoholic version for children which uses fruit juice instead.

The origins of sangria are unclear, but it is thought to have stemmed from the 18th century, when Spain traded with its Central American colonies.
10. Oranges can even be used as a flavouring for bread! This orangey bread shown here is called limpa bread, but can you guess which European country it comes from? (Hint: you could eat it on an IKEA table.)

Answer: Sweden

This is one of the lesser-known dishes in my quiz. Limpa bread, or vörtlimpa/vörtbröd ('wort loaf'/'wort bread'), is a Swedish bread that gets its name from brewer's wort, the liquid produced while making whisky. It is a rye bread flavoured with orange, stout, and spices such as fennel and star anise, and uses treacle for colouring.

Some versions use cardamom instead of caraway, or add dried fruits such as raisins. Limpa bread often forms part of the julbord, a traditional Swedish Christmas buffet.
Source: Author Kankurette

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor jmorrow before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
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