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Quiz about Wrong Way
Quiz about Wrong Way

Wrong Way Trivia Quiz


Kitchen disasters and experimental mishaps have often produced unexpectedly interesting results. Here's ten culinary incidents where something went terribly or deliciously WRONG!

A multiple-choice quiz by tiye. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
tiye
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
370,510
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
730
Last 3 plays: Guest 92 (5/10), beckybelle (9/10), bigwoo (6/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. This "blue veined" cheese that is perfectly matched with pears, walnuts and sweet wines, was created by a fungus. What is its "protected" name? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Ruth Graves Wakefield, a dietician and owner of the Toll House Inn in Whitman Massachusetts, was the inventor of the chocolate chip cookie, by accident. She sold her invention to Andrew Nestlé, owner of a chocolate company.
What did she receive for her recipe?
Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Originally called "devil's wine" since the corks popped in the cellars creating havoc, this liquid took a lot of work to become synonymous with luxury. What is its name? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. The famous French upside-down apple pie was invented in the 1880s by two sisters, owners of a country hotel, 160 km south of Paris, in Lamotte-Beuvron.
What is the name of the dessert?
Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Saccharin, a chemical substitute for sugar with no nutritional value, was accidentally invented in a laboratory of a famous university. Which university? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Potato chips owe their existence to a difficult, unsatisfied customer and a fed-up chef who wanted to teach him a lesson. Where did this incident take place? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. A dessert called "Eton mess" is traditionally served at the annual cricket game between Eton College and Harrow School in England. What is it made of? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Currywurst is a simple but hearty street food, ideal after a night of partying. Which country claims its origin? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. During the Ottoman era in Turkey, a kitchen accident produced a dessert which met unexpected success at the palace. Its name is 'kazan dibi' and what does it literally mean? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. To bring this culinary odyssey to an end, we need something to refresh our breath, a piece of chewing gum would be ideal.
Who is the unanticipated historical figure who is associated with the manufacturing of modern chewing gum?
(Hint: He's the protagonist of a famous battle).
Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Jun 16 2024 : Guest 92: 5/10
May 30 2024 : beckybelle: 9/10
May 28 2024 : bigwoo: 6/10
May 21 2024 : Rumpo: 10/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. This "blue veined" cheese that is perfectly matched with pears, walnuts and sweet wines, was created by a fungus. What is its "protected" name?

Answer: Roquefort

The fungus "penicillium roqueforti" is responsible for Roquefort cheese which is created and matured only in the limestone caves of Roquefort, near Toulouse, France as a "protected designation of origin" product.
The legend says that a peasant boy was having his lunch of bread and ewe cheese in the cool shade of a cave when he saw a beautiful girl and rushed to meet her, leaving his lunch behind. When he returned to the cave many days later, the cheese was moldy and had a sharp, smoky taste.
Interestingly, long before Alexander Fleming invented penicillin, the peasants of the Roquefort area, used the cheese on wounds to avoid infection and gangrene.
2. Ruth Graves Wakefield, a dietician and owner of the Toll House Inn in Whitman Massachusetts, was the inventor of the chocolate chip cookie, by accident. She sold her invention to Andrew Nestlé, owner of a chocolate company. What did she receive for her recipe?

Answer: A lifetime supply of Nestlé chocolate

In 1930, Ruth Graves Wakefield and her husband bought the Toll House Inn where Ruth cooked and baked her own recipes and became famous for her desserts. One day she ran out of powdered baking chocolate and decided to chop up a bar of semisweet chocolate, hoping that it would melt in the batter. The morsels of chocolate did not melt but softened and the chocolate chip cookie was born.
The bar of chocolate Ruth used was given to her by Andrew Nestlé of the Nestlé Chocolate Company and as The Toll House chocolate chip cookie became popular so did the semisweet Nestlé chocolate. Nestlé made a deal with Wakefield, to print the recipe on the package of the chocolate in exchange for a lifelong supply of Nestlé chocolate.
Wakefield's recipe is still made in kitchens all over the world.
3. Originally called "devil's wine" since the corks popped in the cellars creating havoc, this liquid took a lot of work to become synonymous with luxury. What is its name?

Answer: Champagne

Bubbles were not originally what the Champenois wine makers wanted in their wine. They wanted the nice full-boded wines of their Burgundian neighbors. To their horror, what they got instead were light, pinkish, bubbly wines that popped the corks while fermenting in the cool cellars!
In the 17th century, they hired Benedictine monk Dom Pérignon to "fix" the embarrassing problem. He experimented but soon realized the hidden value of the bubbles. He further developed the quality of the wine with the blend of the right grapes, the method of the two fermentations - once in the barrels and another one in the bottles, made the bottles thicker so that they wouldn't break from the pressure and corked them after the second fermentation so that they wouldn't pop.
Champagne comes only from the Champagne region of France. Every other bubbly wine is called "sparkling" wine and those wine makers that follow the strict rules of champagne making, can use "methode champenoise" on their label.
4. The famous French upside-down apple pie was invented in the 1880s by two sisters, owners of a country hotel, 160 km south of Paris, in Lamotte-Beuvron. What is the name of the dessert?

Answer: Tarte Tatin

An overworked Stéphanie Tatin, while preparing the apples in butter and sugar for a traditional apple pie , left the pan in the oven for too long. Trying to salvage her work, she placed the pastry base on top of the apples and continued baking it. She turned the pie upside-down and served, hoping the clients wouldn't realise her mistake.
The pie became a success and although the sisters never named the dessert after themselves or published it in any recipe book, it went down in culinary history as Tarte Tatin.
There is another version of the story, that the pie fell to the floor and Stéphanie picked it up and served it anyway. I choose not to believe that, for obvious reasons.
5. Saccharin, a chemical substitute for sugar with no nutritional value, was accidentally invented in a laboratory of a famous university. Which university?

Answer: Johns Hopkins

In 1877, a Russian chemist, named Constantin Fahlberg, was working for a sugar company in a laboratory provided to him by Johns Hopkins professor Ira Remsen.
After a day of work at the lab, Fahlberg sat down to dinner and as he put his bread roll in his mouth, the bread tasted sweet. He remembered he had accidentally spilled a vial of a compound on his hands (poor sanitary habits).
When he returned to the lab, he discovered that the sweetness came from o-sulfobenzoic acid reacting with phosphorus chloride and ammonia which produced benzoic sulfinide, the first artificial substitute for cane sugar.
He patented his findings in 1886, in the midst of a scientific conflict with professor Ira Remsen.
6. Potato chips owe their existence to a difficult, unsatisfied customer and a fed-up chef who wanted to teach him a lesson. Where did this incident take place?

Answer: Saratoga Springs, New York

In Saratoga Springs' restaurant Moon's Lake House, in 1853, a customer sent his order of fried potatoes back, claiming they were cut too thick. Chef George Crum sliced a fresh batch thinner and still the customer found them too thick and not crispy enough.

The chef sliced a third batch paper thin, fried them in very hot grease, sprinkled them with a generous amount of salt and served them. To his surprise, the customer proclaimed them the tastiest, crispiest french fries he had ever tasted and this method of preparing potatoes became a big hit in the region.

It didn't take long to spread worldwide.
7. A dessert called "Eton mess" is traditionally served at the annual cricket game between Eton College and Harrow School in England. What is it made of?

Answer: Strawberries, meringues and cream

This delicious but not very elegant dessert is made from pieces of meringues, strawberries and cream, sometimes ice cream. The name dates to the 19th century and it could have come from its appearance, a mixture of ingredients put together in an unconstructed and messy way.
The interesting but unsubstantiated story connected with Eton mess, is that a meringue dessert was transported to the school picnic, the basket was crushed by a playful Labrador and the meringue pieces were served with strawberries and cream in an attempt to save the dessert.
8. Currywurst is a simple but hearty street food, ideal after a night of partying. Which country claims its origin?

Answer: Germany

Currywurst is pork sausage, first steamed, then fried, cut into pieces and seasoned with curry ketchup. Sometimes it is accompanied by french fries.
It came into existence in 1949, in post-war Berlin, where a woman named Herta Heuwer was looking for a way to make the best of the limited food staples.
She acquired large quantities of curry powder, ketchup and Worcestershire sauce from British soldiers and experimented by mixing them all together with spices and serving them on top of a very simple sausage (wurst). It became so popular that she ended up selling more than 10,000 pieces a week, creating an inexpensive food icon.
9. During the Ottoman era in Turkey, a kitchen accident produced a dessert which met unexpected success at the palace. Its name is 'kazan dibi' and what does it literally mean?

Answer: The bottom of the pan

While boiling the milk and sugar for the rice pudding, a palace cook forgot it on the stove and the bottom of the pan became caramelized like a crème brûlée. The cook, afraid of being punished, decided to pretend he invented a new dessert, named it kazan dibi and served it to the sultan. The sultan liked it and kazan dibi became one of the most popular Turkish desserts.
It is a very smooth and fine milk custard with one side slightly burnt into caramel. The best kazan dibi is made with buffalo milk.
10. To bring this culinary odyssey to an end, we need something to refresh our breath, a piece of chewing gum would be ideal. Who is the unanticipated historical figure who is associated with the manufacturing of modern chewing gum? (Hint: He's the protagonist of a famous battle).

Answer: Antonio López de Santa Anna

The protagonist of the Battle of the Alamo and 8th President of Mexico had a long military career and was called "The Napoleon of the West".
In the 1860s, after he was exiled and living in New York, he brought from Mexico a substance called "chicle", a natural gum from the Manilkara genus of trees. He gave some to his secretary Thomas Adams who thought of using it as a substitute for rubber in the manufacturing of tires. When his idea didn't work, he cut the gum into strips and sold it as Adams New York Chewing Gum, Black Jack and Chiclets. Gradually, "chicle" was replaced by synthetic substances which were cheaper.
Some type of chewing gum has been used since the ancient times, like mastic, plants, resin and grass.
Source: Author tiye

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor WesleyCrusher before going online.
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