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Quiz about English Slang Used in the United Kingdom
Quiz about English Slang Used in the United Kingdom

English Slang Used in the United Kingdom Quiz


An A-Z of slang from a British perspective. Some of the words have more than one meaning, but remember it's the slang definition you are looking for.

A multiple-choice quiz by furby1. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
furby1
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
285,630
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
25
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
19 / 25
Plays
5354
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Kabdanis (11/25), Guest 87 (24/25), Guest 168 (9/25).
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Question 1 of 25
1. What is "Ackers"? Hint


Question 2 of 25
2. In slang terminology what does "Barnaby Rudge" mean? Hint


Question 3 of 25
3. If you are going to "Carry the Can", what are you going to do? Hint


Question 4 of 25
4. What does "Dicey" mean? Hint


Question 5 of 25
5. What does "Easy-peasy" mean? Hint


Question 6 of 25
6. What does "It's a Fair Cop" mean? Hint


Question 7 of 25
7. In slang terms what is a "Gaffer"? Hint


Question 8 of 25
8. What would happen if you were offered "Hobson's choice"? Hint


Question 9 of 25
9. "I'll go to the foot of our stairs!" What does this mean? Hint


Question 10 of 25
10. If someone using rhyming slang said that you were doing a "Jimmy Hill", what would you be doing? Hint


Question 11 of 25
11. Who or what is a "Kopite"? Hint


Question 12 of 25
12. If someone said they were a "Lanky", where would they be from? Hint


Question 13 of 25
13. If someone is "Mafted" what are they? Hint


Question 14 of 25
14. If someone was to say "Not on your Nelly", what would they mean? Hint


Question 15 of 25
15. If you heard someone say that another person was an "Odd-fish", what would they mean? Hint


Question 16 of 25
16. If someone was called a "Paddy" what country would you expect him to originate from? Hint


Question 17 of 25
17. If someone was to give you a "Quid", what would they be giving you? Hint


Question 18 of 25
18. In slang terms what is "Rock 'n' Roll"? Hint


Question 19 of 25
19. What or who is a "Scouser"? Hint


Question 20 of 25
20. What would a "Tealeaf" be in slang terms? Hint


Question 21 of 25
21. If you were "Uncle Dick" what would you be? Hint


Question 22 of 25
22. If you were having a "Vera Lynn", what would you be having? Hint


Question 23 of 25
23. Who or what is a "Woolleyback"? Hint


Question 24 of 25
24. From what area of England is someone who is called a "Yam Yam"? Hint


Question 25 of 25
25. What would you do with a "Zapper"? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Jun 12 2024 : Kabdanis: 11/25
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Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. What is "Ackers"?

Answer: Another word for money

A naval slang word picked up from beggars in far east who would ask for small change (fakka).
2. In slang terminology what does "Barnaby Rudge" mean?

Answer: The Judge

It is Cockney rhyming slang, for instance "I'm up against the Barnaby Rudge in court tomorrow"
Traditionally cockneys are people who were born within the earshot of the "Bow Bells", the bells of St Mary-le-Bow are in Cheapside London.
"Barnaby Rudge: A Tale of the Riots of the 'Eighty" was written by Charles Dickens and published in serial form in 1841.
3. If you are going to "Carry the Can", what are you going to do?

Answer: To take responsibility for a mistake

For example: "If I make a mistake in this quiz I will carry the can".
This may have come from the Royal Navy in the 19th Century. A crew member would collect the crew's ration of beer for the others in a can, and would then be responsible for any droppage.
4. What does "Dicey" mean?

Answer: Risky

Example: "Any form of gambling is a dicey business, especially if you're no good at it".
It probably comes from the RAF in World War II. They called war time flying "Dicing" as they were gambling with death. Dicey-do meant they'd had a close call with death.
5. What does "Easy-peasy" mean?

Answer: Very simple

Usually a child's expression. This quiz is easy-peasy.
6. What does "It's a Fair Cop" mean?

Answer: A legitimate arrest

"Cop" may have come from the Anglo-Saxon word "copian" meaning to steal or plunder. So in this sense it is meant as to be captured or seized legitimately for the crime that was committed.
This was often used in police television series and second rate detective novels.
7. In slang terms what is a "Gaffer"?

Answer: Foreman or boss

It is a term of respect, probably a contraction of Godfather. Also it is the chief electrician in charge of electricity on a film or television set.
8. What would happen if you were offered "Hobson's choice"?

Answer: There is no choice, only one item/decision being offered

Thomas Hobson (1544-1630) was the owner of a livery stable in Cambridge England.
He would rotate his horses so that they all had a rest before being hired out. The hirer could take the horse most rested which would be the one nearest the stable door or none at all.

A modern example would be Henry Ford, who is reputed to have sold the Model-T Ford in "any colour as long as it was black".
9. "I'll go to the foot of our stairs!" What does this mean?

Answer: Exclamation of surprise

A Northern expression, usually heard in Lancashire and Yorkshire. You would normally say "Well isn't that a surprise!".
10. If someone using rhyming slang said that you were doing a "Jimmy Hill", what would you be doing?

Answer: Taking a tablet, a pill

Rhyming slang "Hill-pill".
Jimmy Hill was a well known English footballer, first playing for Brentford and then for Fulham. He retired as a player and eventually became Chairman of Coventry City Football Club. Alongside this he had a career in broadcasting and was well known as the presenter of the program "Match of the Day".
11. Who or what is a "Kopite"?

Answer: Supporter of Liverpool football club

The Kop is a terrace at Anfield Stadium home to Liverpool Football Club. It is short for "Spion Kop" a battle in the Second Boer War in 1900, where a lot of men from the Kings Regiment (Liverpool) died.
12. If someone said they were a "Lanky", where would they be from?

Answer: County of Lancashire.

Lancashire is in the North West of England and takes its name from Lancaster, its county town. It was established in 1182 and has as its symbol the Red Rose of Lancaster. In the 15th century there was the Battle of the Roses between the House of Lancaster( Red) and the House of York (White) for the throne of England.
13. If someone is "Mafted" what are they?

Answer: Hot and bothered

A North East/Yorkshire term. "I feel real mafted", meaning I feel really hot and bothered. The origin of the word is no longer known.
14. If someone was to say "Not on your Nelly", what would they mean?

Answer: No way, not on your life, never

This is when Cockney rhyming slang can become slightly difficult. "Not on your Nelly" is short for "Not on your Nelly Duff", which was put together just because "Duff" rhymes with Puff which itself means air, breath of life. So Nelly Duff is "not on your life"!
15. If you heard someone say that another person was an "Odd-fish", what would they mean?

Answer: They were an eccentric or unusual person

Similar to the American "Odd Ball". Since about the 18th century "fish" has been used to denote a man, quite often a sailor. So if someone is an "odd-fish" they were an odd-man.
16. If someone was called a "Paddy" what country would you expect him to originate from?

Answer: Ireland

A "Paddy" is an Irishman. It is slang from the pet form of the Irish name Padraig or Patrick. It is often used offensively.
17. If someone was to give you a "Quid", what would they be giving you?

Answer: One Pound Sterling

The plural is the same as the singular, so you would ask for "fifty quid" not "fifty quids". Its origin is unsure but it may be derived from the Royal Mint at Quidhampton in Wiltshire England, or from the term Quid Pro Quo - Quid "That which is".
18. In slang terms what is "Rock 'n' Roll"?

Answer: Social Security Benefits

Social Security Benefits are commonly called "Dole" in the UK. "Rock 'n' Roll" is cockney rhyming slang. So you would hear someone say "Are you going to get your Rock n Roll?", meaning are they going to collect their Social Security Benefits.
19. What or who is a "Scouser"?

Answer: Liverpudlian, person from Liverpool

Scouse is derived from the word "Lobscouse" a sailor's dish made from meat stewed with vegetables and ship's biscuits. In the 18th and 19th centuries Liverpool had a large number of immigrants; as their dialects intermingled they began to have an accent far different from those of the surrounding towns and countryside.
20. What would a "Tealeaf" be in slang terms?

Answer: Thief

Cockney Rhyming Slang. Example would be " I've just heard our new neighbour is a tealeaf (thief)".
21. If you were "Uncle Dick" what would you be?

Answer: Unwell, sick

Rhyming slang. Example: "I wasn't able to go to the concert, I was Uncle Dick (sick)".
22. If you were having a "Vera Lynn", what would you be having?

Answer: Gin

Another rhyming slang term.
Dame Vera Lynn, nicknamed "The Forces' Sweetheart" in World War II. She was born in London in 1917 and was well known for singing "The White Cliffs of Dover" and "We'll Meet Again".
23. Who or what is a "Woolleyback"?

Answer: Non-Liverpudlian, but who lives in a neighbouring town

The term originated in the 19th century on the docks. If only a few sheep were being ferried, the dockers wouldn't use the big gangway, they would carry the sheep ashore on their backs holding it by the forelegs. The sheep's fleece full of lanolin oil would stain and soak the men's clothes.
24. From what area of England is someone who is called a "Yam Yam"?

Answer: The Black Country

The Black Country is an area in the West Midlands of England. It has its own dialect, and is very similar to how early English was spoken. They say "Yow am" instead of "You are" which is where Yam Yam comes from.
25. What would you do with a "Zapper"?

Answer: Use it on the TV or Stereo unit

What would we do without them!
Source: Author furby1

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