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Quiz about Did I Hear Someone Say Loser
Quiz about Did I Hear Someone Say Loser

Did I Hear Someone Say, "Loser!"? Quiz


SF & Fantasy novels which, although runners-up to the award winner, were better than, or at least as good as, the book which did win. (Using the advantage of hindsight.) I'll tell you a bit about each one, and who wrote it; you pick out the title.

A multiple-choice quiz by Rimrunner. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
Rimrunner
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
331,036
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
275
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. This fantasy novel by Andre Norton spawned a huge series which caught the imagination of many writers as well as winning a large following of fans around the world. Now recognised as a seminal work in the genre, what novel was this 1964 Hugo Nominee? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Philip K. Dick is one of those authors known to millions - who do not know it! Not read as much as he deserves, several of his books have been made into successful films. This particular book was a Nebula Nominee in 1968, but failed to take first prize (deserving though it was, competition was stiff that year). However, it was the basis for the hugely successful cult SF movie 'Blade Runner', starring Harrison Ford. What was this book's title? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. This book by Alexei Panshin is a singular gem. On a starship engaged in a voyage generations long, a young girl is one of those tested for the fitness to survive. Nominated for a Hugo in 1969, what was the title? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Nominated for a Hugo in 1979, C. J. Cherryh's first volume in 'The Faded Sun' series deals with two alien races and their very different psychologies in a three way conflict with humanity across space and for planetary resources. The 'Faded Sun' series is unforgettable. What is the title of the first book in the series? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. John Crowley wrote a completely engrossing fat fantasy book which was absolutely wonderful. The Drinkwater family story is entwined with their relationship with the world of Faery. It was nominated for a Hugo in 1982, but unfortunately for Crowley that was the year in which C.J. Cherryh produced 'Downbelow Station', which won. What was the name of Crowley's major work? (Not 'Ægypt' - that came later.) Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. In 1981 C.J. Cherryh produced the first story of a new series, which would become one of her many fans' best-loved. This book was a Hugo Nominee in 1983, and revolves around a group of feisty female feline space traders and their fatefully fostered friend, a human named Tully. Compact Space is home to seven intelligent species (not all of which are intelligible), and humanity is unknown here. What wonderful book is this? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Quite possibly Margaret Atwood's most memorable work, this modern classic is social fiction rather than SF, in the same way as George Orwell's '1984'. Its premise is: 'If the most radical, conservative faction of men were to get into power, what might the future of a society shaped by them be like - especially for women?' It was nominated for a Nebula award (and the Booker prize) in 1986. Which of Atwood's novels is this? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. In 1986 a book by David Brin was nominated for the Hugo award (and for the Nebula, in 1985). This memorable post-apocalyptic work is named for a minor cog in civilized society. Kevin Costner starred in a movie of the same name in 1997. What book was this? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Another Hugo Nominee for 1986, by Greg Bear, was also nominated for the Nebula and John W. Campbell awards in that year. In this book a scientist injects 'noocytes' (nanomachines) into his own body; they develop self-awareness and begin to change both him and themselves in ways which could lead to utter catastrophe. What was the title? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Something different for the last question: Among all these excellent authors is my personal all-time SF and Fantasy favourite. This writer is probably best known for the utterly convincing and gripping SF Alliance-Union universe, or for the Fantasy-style SF of the 'Chronicles of Morgaine'. Who is, at least in my opinion, the best ever SF and Fantasy writer? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. This fantasy novel by Andre Norton spawned a huge series which caught the imagination of many writers as well as winning a large following of fans around the world. Now recognised as a seminal work in the genre, what novel was this 1964 Hugo Nominee?

Answer: Witch World

The 1964 Hugo winner was Clifford D. Simak's 'Here Gather the Stars'. Looking back, it seems to me that 'Witch World' was the work with greater depth, and was certainly more successful. Andre Norton will always be a great story teller, with a gift for creating engaging characters. The other three titles were chosen at random from Norton's extensive output: around 200 full length novels!
2. Philip K. Dick is one of those authors known to millions - who do not know it! Not read as much as he deserves, several of his books have been made into successful films. This particular book was a Nebula Nominee in 1968, but failed to take first prize (deserving though it was, competition was stiff that year). However, it was the basis for the hugely successful cult SF movie 'Blade Runner', starring Harrison Ford. What was this book's title?

Answer: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

All of the wrong answers are also books by Dick; as you can see he produces some wonderful titles as well as content. Philip K. Dick wrote thoughtful and thought-provoking SF, which combined good story-telling with sharp social observation. Two other well-known movies also based on Dick's books are 'Total Recall' and 'Minority Report'.
3. This book by Alexei Panshin is a singular gem. On a starship engaged in a voyage generations long, a young girl is one of those tested for the fitness to survive. Nominated for a Hugo in 1969, what was the title?

Answer: Rite of Passage

'Rite of Passage' lost out in favour of John Brunner's 'Stand on Zanzibar', which I have not read. Panshin's work is a book which I reread every few years, which should tell you something about its quality. It seems likely to me that since 'Rite of Passage' was in fact awarded the Nebula in the previous year, the delegates felt that it had already been recognised.

The incorrect answers were all well-known titles by Robert A. Heinlein - which was supposed to make picking the right answer easier.
4. Nominated for a Hugo in 1979, C. J. Cherryh's first volume in 'The Faded Sun' series deals with two alien races and their very different psychologies in a three way conflict with humanity across space and for planetary resources. The 'Faded Sun' series is unforgettable. What is the title of the first book in the series?

Answer: Kesrith

Vonda N. McIntyre's 'Dreamsnake' was good and it was entertaining, and it got the Hugo in '79. It was never going to be as good as the 'Faded Sun' series - but it was only up against volume 1, 'Kesrith'. The other 'Faded Sun' titles are, in order, 'Shon'jir' and 'Kutath'; but 'Cyteen' (also by Cherryh) is a completely separate SF tour de force, which did win a Hugo.
5. John Crowley wrote a completely engrossing fat fantasy book which was absolutely wonderful. The Drinkwater family story is entwined with their relationship with the world of Faery. It was nominated for a Hugo in 1982, but unfortunately for Crowley that was the year in which C.J. Cherryh produced 'Downbelow Station', which won. What was the name of Crowley's major work? (Not 'Ægypt' - that came later.)

Answer: Little, Big

While 'Little, Big' missed out on the Hugo, it did earn the World Fantasy Award that year. The other titles are also Crowley's, but are all much shorter books; I am particularly fond of the enchanting 'Engine Summer'.
6. In 1981 C.J. Cherryh produced the first story of a new series, which would become one of her many fans' best-loved. This book was a Hugo Nominee in 1983, and revolves around a group of feisty female feline space traders and their fatefully fostered friend, a human named Tully. Compact Space is home to seven intelligent species (not all of which are intelligible), and humanity is unknown here. What wonderful book is this?

Answer: The Pride of Chanur

Beaten to the Hugo by Isaac Asimov's 'Foundation Series' sequel, 'Foundation's Edge', the 'Pride' and the whole Chanur series knock 'Foundation' right off its pedestal. Don't argue with me till you've read all of both, ok? The whole series is: 'The Pride of Chanur', which stands as an independent story, but also sets the scene for the rest of the series; then the linked group, 'Chanur's Venture', 'The Kif Strike Back'*, and 'Chanur's Homecoming'; and finally, another separate story (the next generation), 'Chanur's Legacy'.
The wrong answers are all titles by another excellent female SF author, Ursula K. LeGuin.

*Cherryh comments on this book, "Never joke with a publisher about a title!"
7. Quite possibly Margaret Atwood's most memorable work, this modern classic is social fiction rather than SF, in the same way as George Orwell's '1984'. Its premise is: 'If the most radical, conservative faction of men were to get into power, what might the future of a society shaped by them be like - especially for women?' It was nominated for a Nebula award (and the Booker prize) in 1986. Which of Atwood's novels is this?

Answer: The Handmaid's Tale

The 1986 Nebula winner was Orson Scott Card's 'Speaker for the Dead', a good book and more SF than 'The Handmaid's Tale', which *might* explain why it won. It is 'The Handmaid's Tale', however, that has shown the quality and durability of great writing. Margaret Atwood is a Booker prize winner, but that was for 'The Blind Assassin', in 2000.

The incorrect answers are also Atwood titles, but of her poetry books, not her novels.
8. In 1986 a book by David Brin was nominated for the Hugo award (and for the Nebula, in 1985). This memorable post-apocalyptic work is named for a minor cog in civilized society. Kevin Costner starred in a movie of the same name in 1997. What book was this?

Answer: The Postman

The Hugo winner in 1986 was Orson Scott Card's 'Ender's Game', a very good book but one without the impact of 'The Postman'. The movie version was, of course, Hollywoodised into an action movie; you really need to read the book. While it did not get either the Nebula or the Hugo, 'The Postman' did win both the John W. Campbell and the Locus awards in that year.
9. Another Hugo Nominee for 1986, by Greg Bear, was also nominated for the Nebula and John W. Campbell awards in that year. In this book a scientist injects 'noocytes' (nanomachines) into his own body; they develop self-awareness and begin to change both him and themselves in ways which could lead to utter catastrophe. What was the title?

Answer: Blood Music

The Hugo winner in 1986 was Orson Scott Card's 'Ender's Game', as noted in Question 8. 'Blood Music' by Greg Bear was as deserving as Brin's offering of the same year; I believe both were at least as deserving as 'Ender's Game', if not more so. The short story on which 'Blood Music' was based did in fact win, in its category, both the Hugo and Nebula awards, so this one did not go totally without recognition.

The wrong answers are all prominent books by Arthur C. Clarke, another great SF writer.
10. Something different for the last question: Among all these excellent authors is my personal all-time SF and Fantasy favourite. This writer is probably best known for the utterly convincing and gripping SF Alliance-Union universe, or for the Fantasy-style SF of the 'Chronicles of Morgaine'. Who is, at least in my opinion, the best ever SF and Fantasy writer?

Answer: C.J. Cherryh

In addition to the 'Faded Sun' series, the Alliance/Union books and the 'Morgaine' chronicles, C.J. Cherryh is the creator of the Finisterre couplet; in pure Fantasy, the 'Dreamstone' books and brilliant individual novels such as 'The Paladin' and 'The Goblin Mirror', not to mention the outstanding 'Fortress' series, and the Russian folk-tale based horror-fantasy of the 'Rusalka' trilogy; last but not least, in SF, the 'Foreigner' series. There's much more, but I'd better stop.

For those who might be interested in reading Cherryh, I suggest starting with one of these:

SF:
'Heavy Time' - followed by 'Hellburner', and then many more; the Alliance/Union books generally pack the kind of punch that will leave you with the taste of blood in your mouth.
'The Pride of Chanur' - followed by the others in the Chanur series.
'Foreigner' - followed by 'Invader' and 'Inheritor', and more.
'The Faded Sun: Kesrith' - followed by 'Shon'jir' and 'Kutath'.
'Cuckoo's Egg'
'Serpent's Reach'
'The Paladin'

Fantasy or Fantasy-style SF:
'Gate of Ivrel' and then the others in the 'Morgaine' series.
'Fortress in the Eye of Time'
'Rider at the Gate'
'Rusalka'
Source: Author Rimrunner

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor LadyCaitriona before going online.
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