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Quiz about Memorable Poetry Recalled
Quiz about Memorable Poetry Recalled

Memorable Poetry Recalled Trivia Quiz


This quiz is about poems I have loved and lived with since I was a child. I delight in sharing them with you now. So, I give you some first lines of some memorable poems and a clue or two and you tell me the poet.

A multiple-choice quiz by bracklaman. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
bracklaman
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
266,441
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
1810
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Last 3 plays: SixShutouts66 (5/10), rossian (10/10), Guest 86 (7/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. This American born but British citizen was apparently fond of cats as he was to feature them, in several aspects, in other poetic works. It has to be said that some of his other works were pretty sombre. Who was the poet who wrote these lines?

"Jellicle Cats come out at night
Jellicle cats come one and all:
The Jellicle Moon is shining bright
Jellicles come to the Jellicle Ball."
Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Now for some lines of sound advice (Oh dear, was that a pun!). Advice I think I should probably take to heart. But, do you know who the vertically challenged poet was who wrote these opening lines?

"A little learning is a dangerous thing;
drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring;"
Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. More inspired advice came from the poet who wrote these opening lines.
But which poet, can you tell me?

"The Camel's hump is an ugly lump
Which well you may see at the Zoo;
But uglier yet is the hump we get
From having too little to do"
Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Some lines of poetry from childhood this time perhaps. Which poet gave us these opening lines of verse?

"Little Boy kneels at the foot of the bed,
Droops on the little hands golden head.
Huish! Hush! Whisper who dares!
Christopher Robin is saying his prayers"


Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. These opening lines are from one of my all time favourites. I hope you like it too and can remember the poet who composed them?

"Is there anyone there?' said the Traveller,
Knocking on the moonlit door;"
Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. This poet and author wrote ripping yarns, horror fiction and travel books as well as poetry. These opening lines I have chosen for you to identify bring to life the excitement of the newly invented steam rail travel. As a member of a family of greatly respected engineers and inventors we should not be surprised that he so closely catches the evocation of the exciting and speedy train travel. So who was he?

"Faster than fairies, faster than witches
Bridges and house, hedges and ditches
And charging along like troops in a battle
All through the meadows the horses the cattle"

Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. This poem of which these are the opening lines appeared in a fantasy novel though it was also published. It was and is a great favourite with children of all ages. The author and poet was a noted academic and university mathematics tutor. Can you tell me his pen name and not his real name please?

"Will you walk a little faster?'" said a whiting to a snail.
There's a porpoise close behind us, and he's treading on my tail"

Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. So strongly is this author and poet associated with a 'Corner' in English Literature that it is sometimes forgotten that he penned many poems for children too.

There is a regal flavour to these opening lines of poetry. Can you tell me who the poet was?
"The King asked
The Queen, and
The Queen asked
The Dairymaid:
'Could we have some butter for
The Royal slice of bread?'"

Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. This particular author had many gifts including illustration, writing songs and poems. He has been especially identified with humorous lines of which these are an example. Can you identify this poet for me please?

"There was an Old Derry down Derry, who loved to see little folks merry;
So he made them a book, and with laughter they shook at the fun of that Derry down Derry."
Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. This author survived severe literary criticism, political opposition at a cruel and dangerous time in British history, coped with domestic difficulties and personal affliction to produce some of the most memorable poetry in the English language.

I don't think I could ever be a friend of this man but I admire him greatly. Do you know who he was? He wrote these lines:

"They also serve who only stand and wait"
Hint



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Feb 23 2024 : SixShutouts66: 5/10
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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. This American born but British citizen was apparently fond of cats as he was to feature them, in several aspects, in other poetic works. It has to be said that some of his other works were pretty sombre. Who was the poet who wrote these lines? "Jellicle Cats come out at night Jellicle cats come one and all: The Jellicle Moon is shining bright Jellicles come to the Jellicle Ball."

Answer: T. S. Eliot

He was born Thomas Stearns Eliot (1888-1965) in St. Louis, Missouri, the son of Henry Ware Eliot, president of the Hydraulic-Press Brick Company, and Charlotte Champe Stearns, a former teacher. From these comfortable surroundings he became one of the best known literary figures as poet, critic, and editor of his day.

During my time studying for Literature 'A' levels and then as part of my degree he was one of the first points of reference in any critique.
2. Now for some lines of sound advice (Oh dear, was that a pun!). Advice I think I should probably take to heart. But, do you know who the vertically challenged poet was who wrote these opening lines? "A little learning is a dangerous thing; drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring;"

Answer: A. Pope

A. Pope whose full name was Alexander Pope wrote the poem 'A Little Learning' of which these are the opening lines.

Pope (1688-1744) was the son of a Roman Catholic London cloth merchant. The family religion prevented Pope from attending University and he was educated largely by priests until his early teens. After that he was mainly self taught. He was very widely read in English letters, as well as in French, Italian, Latin, and Greek.

A devastating illness in his early childhood left him deformed. He never grew taller than 4 ft 6 in and was subject to violent headaches. Perhaps as a result of this condition, he was hypersensitive and exceptionally irritable all his life.
3. More inspired advice came from the poet who wrote these opening lines. But which poet, can you tell me? "The Camel's hump is an ugly lump Which well you may see at the Zoo; But uglier yet is the hump we get From having too little to do"

Answer: Rudyard Kipling

These lines are by Rudyard Kipling from his poem 'The Hump'.

Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) was born in Bombay in what is the present day Mombai.

His father was a teacher in a local school of art. As was fairly common practice at the time for middle class families he was sent to England (aged six) to be educated at public school life. He was abused by his foster parents and had a generally unhappy childhood.
Some critics have seen the experiences of his relatively unhappy childhood reflected in his works aimed at children in his writing, especially in his masterpiece, the novel Kim (1901)
He also wrote instructive and amusing tales for children, always with a strict moral tone such as 'The Jungle Book' and the 'Just So Stories'.
4. Some lines of poetry from childhood this time perhaps. Which poet gave us these opening lines of verse? "Little Boy kneels at the foot of the bed, Droops on the little hands golden head. Huish! Hush! Whisper who dares! Christopher Robin is saying his prayers"

Answer: A A Milne

A A Milne published these lines in his 1923 poem 'Vespers', which was first published in the magazine 'Vanity Fair'. It was his first poem to feature his son Christopher Robin.

Alan Alexander Milne (1882 - 1956) was born in Hampstead, London. He was the youngest son of three born to John Vine Milne and Sarah Maria Heginbotham. Alan was first educated at Henley House where his father was a school teacher. He continued his education at Westminster School and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he graduated with a degree in mathematics in 1903. Milne's first literary efforts were published in the humorous magazine 'Punch', where, in 1906 Milne started to work as Assistant Editor. Milne later resigned his post at 'Punch' and concentrated on writing plays.
5. These opening lines are from one of my all time favourites. I hope you like it too and can remember the poet who composed them? "Is there anyone there?' said the Traveller, Knocking on the moonlit door;"

Answer: Walter de la Mare

Walter de la Mare wrote these lines in his poem 'The Listeners'

Walter de la Mare (1873 - 1956) was born in London. He was buried at St Paul's Cathedral a rare honour reserved for the most respected literary greats of Britain. Curiously in his childhood he had been a chorister in the cathedral choir.
He was widely feted during his lifetime for his creative writing which included writing stories, novels, poetry and criticism - not to mention his compiling and editing of anthologies and received honorary degrees from several universities.
He was made Companion of Honour (1948) and was awarded the Order of Merit in 1953.
6. This poet and author wrote ripping yarns, horror fiction and travel books as well as poetry. These opening lines I have chosen for you to identify bring to life the excitement of the newly invented steam rail travel. As a member of a family of greatly respected engineers and inventors we should not be surprised that he so closely catches the evocation of the exciting and speedy train travel. So who was he? "Faster than fairies, faster than witches Bridges and house, hedges and ditches And charging along like troops in a battle All through the meadows the horses the cattle"

Answer: R L Stevenson

Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson (1850- 1894) was a Scottish novelist, poet, and travel writer. He was a prolific author and very popular.

His poetry included:
'A Child's Garden of Verses' (1885) which was an anthology written for children to be read with their parents. This anthology contained the very popular "My Shadow" and "The Lamplighter".
'Underwoods' (1887), a collection of poetry written in both English and Scots.
'Songs of Travel and Other Verses' (1896)
'Ballads' (1891)
7. This poem of which these are the opening lines appeared in a fantasy novel though it was also published. It was and is a great favourite with children of all ages. The author and poet was a noted academic and university mathematics tutor. Can you tell me his pen name and not his real name please? "Will you walk a little faster?'" said a whiting to a snail. There's a porpoise close behind us, and he's treading on my tail"

Answer: Lewis Carroll

These lines are from 'The Lobster Quadrille' by Lewis Carroll.

Lewis Carroll was the pen name of Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (1832 - 1898) who was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer.
He was best known for 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' and the sequel 'Through the Looking-Glass' . My favourite Carroll poems include 'The Hunting of the Snark' and Jabberwocky'.
8. So strongly is this author and poet associated with a 'Corner' in English Literature that it is sometimes forgotten that he penned many poems for children too. There is a regal flavour to these opening lines of poetry. Can you tell me who the poet was? "The King asked The Queen, and The Queen asked The Dairymaid: 'Could we have some butter for The Royal slice of bread?'"

Answer: A. A. Milne

A A Milne wrote these lines in 'The King's Breakfast'.

Alan Alexander Milne 1882 - 1956). was born in Hampstead, London. He was the youngest son of three born to John Vine Milne and Sarah Maria Heginbotham.

Milne resigned his post at Punch and concentrated on writing plays. In 1923 his first children's poem 'Vespers' was published in Vanity Fair. This poem first featured his son Christopher Robin.

In 1924, after the success of 'Vespers' Milne published a book of children's poems entitled 'When We Were Very Young', with drawings by the Punch illustrator, Ernest Shepard. This book includes a poem about a Teddy Bear who "however hard he tries grows tubby without exercise". This was Pooh's first unofficial appearance in A.A. Milne's writing. 'When We Were Very Young' proved to be an instant success and sold over 50.000 copies within eight weeks.
9. This particular author had many gifts including illustration, writing songs and poems. He has been especially identified with humorous lines of which these are an example. Can you identify this poet for me please? "There was an Old Derry down Derry, who loved to see little folks merry; So he made them a book, and with laughter they shook at the fun of that Derry down Derry."

Answer: Edward Lear

Edward Lear (1812 -1888) was born in Highgate, London and died in San Remo, Italy after a full life with an immense literary and illustrative output.
He is worth a quiz all to himself.
He was the twentieth child of Jeremiah Lear, a London stockbroker, and his wife Ann. His wealthy upbringing was to be short lived as his father became a defaulter in the Stock Exchange and the family had to abandon their fashionable life.
His upbringing was further disrupted when his mother spurned him and he was brought up by his sister Ann who was twenty-one years his senior.
He was an early sufferer of what he called 'the Demon' epilepsy and a few years later bouts of acute depression which he called 'the Morbids', sudden changes of mood with, began.
10. This author survived severe literary criticism, political opposition at a cruel and dangerous time in British history, coped with domestic difficulties and personal affliction to produce some of the most memorable poetry in the English language. I don't think I could ever be a friend of this man but I admire him greatly. Do you know who he was? He wrote these lines: "They also serve who only stand and wait"

Answer: John Milton

John Milton (1608- 1674) was a poet political activist and effective civil servant for the English Commonwealth established by Cromwell.
He was most famous for the epic poems 'Paradise Lost' and 'Paradise Regained'.

For a couple of hundred years or so he was considered to be the supreme English poet. During the 1950's it became fashionable to criticise his achievements following the views of famous literary critics like F R Leavis and T.S. Eliot.

Curiously, fifty years on most people have still heard of Milton and fewer I suspect know of Leavis and Eliot's criticism.

Read him yourself I say and make up your own mind.
Source: Author bracklaman

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor Bruyere before going online.
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