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Quiz about Famous People Who Faced Cancer
Quiz about Famous People Who Faced Cancer

Famous People Who Faced Cancer Quiz


Babe Ruth said, "You just can't beat the person who never gives up." How many of these famous faces can you recognize that battled cancer?

A multiple-choice quiz by exceller. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
exceller
Time
3 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
408,485
Updated
Mar 04 23
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
9 / 10
Plays
602
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 71 (7/10), Guest 71 (9/10), Guest 90 (6/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. This war commander led the Union military to victory in the Civil War before he became a United States' president. Which of these men was the 18th president of the United States and died of throat cancer at the age of 63? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. This storyteller brightened the lives of many with his works before he died with liver cancer. Which of these men was a Danish author that wrote 156 fairy tales that included stories, such as "The Little Mermaid", "The Ugly Duckling", and "Thumbelina"? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. This Baseball Hall of Fame legend died of throat cancer at the age of 53. Which of these baseball players was nicknamed the "The Great Bambino", and was a slugging star for the New York Yankees? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. This lady's work in the medical field contributed to her cancer related death in 1934. Which of these ladies was a scientist that won a Nobel prize for her discoveries on using radium? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Walt Disney was a pioneer in children's films and animation. Which of these cancers eventually took the film producer's life while he was working on the project, "The Jungle Book", in 1966? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. This writer and artist was known for making people smile, before passing away of colon cancer. Which of these cartoonists created "Peanuts", a comic strip that featured a beagle and his neighborhood friends? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. This children's writer died of oral cancer at age 87. Which of these writers, wrote the children's books "How The Grinch Stole Christmas" and "The Lorax"? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Sally Ride became the first American woman in space in 1983. How many space missions did she complete, before she died of pancreatic cancer at the age of 61? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Colin Powell, was plagued with multiple myeloma, a cancer known for attacking plasma cells and the body's immune system. Before he passed away, he became the first African-American ___________ . Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Ruth Bader Ginsburg served as an associate justice on the United States Supreme Court until age 87. During her lifetime she faced battles with colon, lung, and pancreatic cancers. How many times did she overcome as a cancer survivor? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. This war commander led the Union military to victory in the Civil War before he became a United States' president. Which of these men was the 18th president of the United States and died of throat cancer at the age of 63?

Answer: Ulysses Grant

Ulysses Grant was born in Ohio and was raised by his father who was a tanner. His career in the military started out against his will. He was sent to West Point in 1822 and graduated in the middle of his class.

The Civil War broke out while he was working in his dad's leather shop in Illinois. In 1861, the governor appointed him to command a small regiment of men. By the end of September, Grant had fully trained his unit and was promoted to general.

Grant was almost removed from his position for his performance at the Battle of Shiloh. However, President Lincoln defended him for his determination to fight. Later Grant would prove his worth at the battle of Vicksburg; the Union victory cut the Confederacy in half.

President Lincoln appointed Grant as General in Chief in 1864. A year later, the Confederacy surrendered. Grant drew up the surrender terms in a way that prevented treason trials.

Grant clashed heads under the administration of President Johnson. When he was elected President of the United States on the Republican ticket in 1869, many were seeking resolutions to situations leftover from the Civil War.

Grant was known for being an honest politician, but was distracted at times by war admirers. He oversaw the Reconstruction of the South and emphasized order with military force. His presidency was tainted by Republican Congressmen that tried to take advantage of the economical situation with fraud and schemes. When he found out he tried to salvage the market by thwarting their plans, but people had lost their trust.

After retiring from the presidency in 1877, Grant experienced excruciating pain in his mouth and throat. He discovered the source was throat cancer, most likely caused by his cigar smoking habits.

During his fight with cancer, Grant was bankrupted thanks to the scheme of one of his financial friends and business partners. Aided by his friend, Mark Twain, he wrote a memoir to pay off his debts and provide for his family. He died soon after publishing the book. Grant passed away at the age of 63 years in 1885.


(Information from "The White House: Presidents of the United States", "History Channel: Ulysses Grant")
2. This storyteller brightened the lives of many with his works before he died with liver cancer. Which of these men was a Danish author that wrote 156 fairy tales that included stories, such as "The Little Mermaid", "The Ugly Duckling", and "Thumbelina"?

Answer: Hans Christian Andersen

Hans Christian Andersen was born in Denmark on April 2, 1805. His father,
Hans Andersen Sr., died in 1816, while he was a young boy. Although the Andersen family did not have much money, Andersen was sent to wealthy boarding schools for his education.

In 1819, Andersen traveled as an actor. He returned to school for a short time sponsored by Jonas Collin. Jonas encouraged Andersen to pursue his love for writing and recording stories, even though it was discouraged by the teachers.

Andersen published his first work, "A Journey on Foot from Holmen's Canal to the East Point of Amager", in 1829. The short story was recognized by the the king, who granted him funds to travel across Europe and collect stories. With the grant, Hans Andersen wrote the stories that became known as his famous collection of fairy tales.

In 1845, Andersen's tales were translated into English and drew attention from foreign audiences. He formed a lifelong friendship with Charles Dickens when he visited the author in 1847. Both authors focused on the poor and needy in their tales and novels. They also focused on hard work, good fortune, and morals with their heroes.

Andersen's work with fairy tales became classics for children's literature and had significant influence on other children's authors such as A. A Milne (author of "Winnie the Pooh") and Beatrix Potter (author of "Peter Rabbit").

Hans Christian Andersen health declined after he sustained a serious injury by falling from his bed in 1872. After the fall, doctors discovered he was showing signs of liver cancer. The Danish government tried to pay for some of his care and honored the author's life work while he was sick. Anderson passed away in 1875.

(Information from "Biography: Hans Christian Andersen", "American Authors: Hans Christian Andersen")
3. This Baseball Hall of Fame legend died of throat cancer at the age of 53. Which of these baseball players was nicknamed the "The Great Bambino", and was a slugging star for the New York Yankees?

Answer: Babe Ruth

George Herman Ruth was born on February 6, 1895. He was raised by a poor family in Baltimore, Maryland. At age seven, George was sent to St. Mary's Industrial School for Boys, where he was mentored by Brother Matthias Boutilier, who taught him how to play baseball. George quickly fell in love with the game and became a stand-out athlete.

At age 19, George Herman Ruth was signed to the Baltimore Orioles where he became nicknamed the "Babe". He later became known by other nicknames including "The Sultan of Swat" and "The Great Bambino."

Babe Ruth became a Major League Baseball celebrity with his left-handed pitcher skills. He pitched 89 winning games for the Boston Red Sox team before he was traded to the New York Yankees in 1920. (After he left the Red Sox, the team did not win another World Series until 2004.) Ruth was switched to an outfielder with the New York team and led his team to seven American League pennants and four World Series victories.

In 1935, Ruth retired from baseball with a record of 714 home runs. Many of his records stayed in place for decades. In 1936, he was among the first class of superstars to be inducted into the United States Baseball Hall of Fame for his hitting and pitching records.

In 1946, Ruth was diagnosed with throat cancer but it was at the stage where doctors could do very few treatments. On June 13, 1948, Ruth appeared at the Yankee Stadium one last time to retire his number. Two months later, he died on August 16, at the age of 53.

In 2018, President Donald Trump posthumously awarded Babe Ruth the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

(Information from "Biography: Babe Ruth", "History Channel: Babe Ruth retires", "United States Baseball Hall of Fame: Babe Ruth", and "History Channel: Babe Ruth Dies", "Sportscaster: Babe Ruth Ravaged by Rare Form of Cancer" )
4. This lady's work in the medical field contributed to her cancer related death in 1934. Which of these ladies was a scientist that won a Nobel prize for her discoveries on using radium?

Answer: Marie Curie

Marie Curie was born in 1867, in Warsaw, Poland. She was the youngest of five children. When her mother died, she became a governess to support herself.
Curie met her husband, Pierre Curie, while she was studying mathematics and physics, at Sorbonne University in Paris. Together they pioneered research on radium and polonium. In 1906, Pierre Curie was killed by a street accident. Marie Curie continued on their work alone.

Marie formed labs to research cures for cancer and study radiology. She developed powerful x-rays that were able to study moving images in the body.
During World War 1, Marie developed mobile x-ray units to diagnose injuries at the battle fronts. She toured Europe asking for supplies and donations to help troops.

Curie died of leukemia on July 4, 1934, a result of years of exposure to radiation through her work. Even today her laboratory notebook from 1899 to 1902, is radioactive. Scientists estimate levels of exposure will cause her notebook to be radioactive for up to 1,500 years.

(Information from "Marie Curie Charity: Marie Curie the Scientist", "Noble Prize: Marie Curie", "History Channel: Marie Curie", "Biography: Marie Curie", "The Science Alert: Marie Curie's Journal")
5. Walt Disney was a pioneer in children's films and animation. Which of these cancers eventually took the film producer's life while he was working on the project, "The Jungle Book", in 1966?

Answer: lung cancer

Walt Disney had a love for drawing since childhood. He grew up on a small farm and sold many of his draws to neighbors and friends. As a teenager, he worked for a newspaper, where he earned enough for art lessons.

When World War I occurred, Walt dropped out of school to join the army. He was rejected by the military for being too young, but found a way to serve by being an ambulance driver for the Red Cross.

Walt returned from war seeking a job as a newspaper artist. He used his skills to establish his own art studio and eventually started doing animated commercials.

Disney took his work with animation to Hollywood and produced animated movies with sound. His earliest production was "Steamboat Willie", which featured a the mouse that became known as Mickey.

In 1937, Disney produced "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs", his first full length animated film. Many predicted that Disney's vision would fail because it had never been tried before. Disney later recalled, "It was prophesied that nobody would sit through a cartoon an hour and a half long, but we had decided there was only one way we could successfully do Snow White-and that was to go for broke-shoot the works. There could be no compromise on money, talent, or time." (Forbes, Greatest Business Stories of All Time)

Walt Disney completed 19 full length animated feature films during his life. His last project was "The Jungle Book", an animated movie, based on Rudyard Kipling's novel. During this movie's production, Walt struggled with his unexpected diagnosis of lung cancer.

Walt had been a heavy smoker since World War I. He began smoking as part of the war culture to look cool and sophisticated. As he became wealthier, it was part of the business social life.

Walt originally suspected nothing wrong and discovered the cancer as part of an injury check up. He had surgery to have a tumor, the size of the walnut, removed. However the cancer spread quickly. After the surgery, Walt's health went downhill and the cancer spread faster. Within months, Disney passed away.

During his time alive, Walt Disney wrote, directed, and produced over 1000 projects (This includes live action, short films, and animated). He established two family parks: Disneyland and Disney World. He also won 26 Academy Awards. He died on Dec. 15, 1966, just 10 days after his 65th birthday. "The Jungle Book" was released after his death.

(Information from: "SurvivorNet: Remembering Walt Disney", "Biography: Walt Disney", "Norman Rockwell Museum: Walt Disney", "Forbes Greatest Business Stories of All Time: Walt Disney")
6. This writer and artist was known for making people smile, before passing away of colon cancer. Which of these cartoonists created "Peanuts", a comic strip that featured a beagle and his neighborhood friends?

Answer: Charles M. Schulz

Charles Shultz was inspired to create cartoons, after his mother passed away of cervical cancer and he joined the Army. He created many of his beloved characters based on his own life.

When he returned home from war, Charles started submitting his drawings and cartoons to "The Saturday Evening Post" and the "St. Paul Pioneer Press". His first comics, "Lil People", featured little children sharing words of wisdom.

On October 2, 1950, Charles Schulz released his first "Peanuts" comic strip. The comics took off in popularity and Schulz achieved his dream of being a professional cartoonist at the age of 27.

Schulz diagnosis with cancer in 1999 was unexpected. He went to the doctor over concerns of numbness in his lower abdomen. Doctors discovered he had a life threatening blockage. During surgery, they discovered that colon cancer had spread extensively.

By the Schulz retired in 1999, he had written for 49 years. "Peanuts" had been featured in 2,600 newspapers worldwide, with book collections translated in over 25 languages.

After a few months of chemotherapy, Schulz died in February 2000. He received the Reuben Award for Outstanding Cartoonists, received Emmy Awards for his animated specials, received a Congressional Gold Medal, and had NASA spacecraft named after his characters.

(Information from "SurviorNet: Remembering Charles Shultz", "Charles M. Schulz Museum")
7. This children's writer died of oral cancer at age 87. Which of these writers, wrote the children's books "How The Grinch Stole Christmas" and "The Lorax"?

Answer: Dr. Seuss

Dr. Seuss wrote books filled with colorful illustrations, eccentric characters, and rhymes. He was inspired to write many of his children's stories from his childhood experiences. He grew up around many zoos and parks, where his father worked as a zoo keeper and director. His father would regularly bring Ted and his siblings on regular adventures to see the animals.

Theodore's mother was the daughter of Bavarian immigrants. She gave up her college dreams to support her family, but worked hard to make sure her children got their education. She would teach her children by singing rhythmic chants and often made up creative songs to sing them to sleep. Dr. Seuss used his mother's rhyming methods in his books.

Dr. Seuss created over 60 books in his lifetime. He is noted for creating "The Cat in the Hat", "Horton Hears A Who", "The Grinch", "The Lorax", "Green Eggs and Ham", and "The Sneetches".

In 1983, Dr. Seuss discovered he had cancer from a routine dental checkup. He had a lesion that was attributed to his many years of smoking. He had surgery to prevent the cancer from spreading, but treatments lead to infection.

Dr. Seuss remained dedicated to his work during his cancer struggle. His works became more inspiring with titles such as "Oh the Places You'll Go" and "You're Only Old Once". He encouraged his younger readers to live life to the fullest with what time they had. In 1991, the world lost Dr. Seuss to his cancer battle.

The New York Times announced Dr. Seuss' Death on September 26, 1991, and hailed him as a modern day "Mother Goose". He had won many literary awards including a Pulitzer citation for over 50 years of children's literary contributions. His works were translated in over 20 languages and had sold over 50 million copies at the time of his death.

(Information from "Survivornet: Dr. Seuss", "Seuss in Springfield Museum", "New York Times Archives: Dr. Seuss Death" )
8. Sally Ride became the first American woman in space in 1983. How many space missions did she complete, before she died of pancreatic cancer at the age of 61?

Answer: 2

Sally Ride spent over 343 hours in space during her career and was a trailblazer for female astronauts. Sally Ride was one of six women selected to enter the astronaut corps in 1978.

In 1983, she flew on the Challenger mission with four other crew members. She became the first American woman in space and the youngest American to go to space at that time. Ride served as the capsule communicator and flight engineer. She was an expert at the shuttle's robotics and working the arms of the ship to send out satellites.

In 1984, She went on another Challenger space mission to observe the Earth. She worked on researching refueling options for shuttles. In 1986, Ride worked on investigating the reasons for the Challenger explosion that claimed the lives of all seven astronauts aboard. She worked with the NASA team to ensure other accidents could be prevented. After the investigation she became a special assistant to the NASA administrator for long range and strategic planning.

Ride became the director of California Space Science Institute in 1989 and taught as a professor at the University of California. She became active in teaching and speaking at many universities across the United States. She wanted to inspire other young women to pursue careers in science and technology.

Sally Ride kept her 17 month cancer battle very private. While she was ill she continued to put all of her focus on providing literacy and education to middle aged girls. She wanted her achievements to be possible for other women with the same dreams.

Ride is one of many astronauts who have died to cancer, due to increased exposure to radiation. President Obama awarded the Medal of Freedom to Ride's family in her honor in 2013.

(Information from: "Pancreatic Cancer Action Network: Sally Ride", "Forbes: Do Astronauts Have An Increased Risk of Cancer?", "Smithsonian: Sally Ride, First Woman in Space", "NASA: Sally Ride")
9. Colin Powell, was plagued with multiple myeloma, a cancer known for attacking plasma cells and the body's immune system. Before he passed away, he became the first African-American ___________ .

Answer: Secretary of State

Colin Powell was raised in the South Bronx of New York City. Although his parents urged him to strive for a better life and education, he didn't have any plans when he graduated high school. His life was impacted by a geology class at City College of New York and he joined the Reserve Officer's Training Corps. He found direction in his life and soon became the commander of his unit. The experience set him on a military career.

In 1962, Powell was one of the 16,000 military advisors sent to South Vietnam by President John F. Kennedy. During his first tour of duty in the Vietnam War, he was awarded the Purple Heart and the Bronze Star. Later he rescued his comrades from a burning helicopter earning him the Soldier's Medal. He returned to serve in the Pentagon after the Vietnam War eended. In 1976, he became a brigadier general and was promoted to command the 2nd Brigade of the 101st Airborne Division.

In 1987, Reagan asked Powell to become the national security adviser, a post he held for the duration of the Reagan administration. In 1989, George H. W Bush made Powell the first African-American to become the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. As a chief military strategist, he developed the "Powell Doctrine." He became respected overseas for his demeanor and approach to international relations. After the 2000 presidential election, President George Bush made Colin Powell the first African-American Secretary of State. Powell proved to be very influential during the aftermath of the September 11th attacks in 2001. He testified before the United Nations and Congress about the United States' need for broad international support.

Powell kept his cancer battle very private. Multiple myeloma was cancer that caused him to frequently have trouble with his immune system. He wanted to remain a strong figure and continued to support other African American "firsts" in politics such as Barack Obama and Condoleezza Rice.
Powell passed away from cancer and Covid complications on October 18, 2021.

(Information from: "Biography: Colin Powell", "CNN: Colin Powell, First Black US Secretary of State Dies", "US Department of State: Colin Powell")
10. Ruth Bader Ginsburg served as an associate justice on the United States Supreme Court until age 87. During her lifetime she faced battles with colon, lung, and pancreatic cancers. How many times did she overcome as a cancer survivor?

Answer: 4

Ruth Bader Ginsburg was appointed to the Supreme Court by President Bill Clinton in 1993. She became the court's first Jewish female justice and second appointed female justice.

Her legacy was marked by her efforts to speak up for women and gender rights. She fought for equal pay for women in the law field and equal opportunities. She was recognized for her opinion in the court's landmark decision of United States vs. Virginia, which opened up the door for women to attend military institutions. (History Channel)

Her first battle with cancer was colon cancer in 1999. Her first battle with pancreatic cancer occurred in 2009. In November 2018 she was diagnosed with lung cancer for the first time. In 2019 she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer again. For four separate diagnoses of cancer, Ginsburg successfully completed treatment and achieved survivor status.

Despite her health, Justice Ginsburg, rarely missed a day of work at the Supreme Court. For over twenty years, she continued to serve on cases that came before the court, while receiving cancer treatment. Ginsburg used her experience as a survivor and her knowledge on the Supreme Court to encourage others. She wanted to do the job as long as she could do it "full steam ahead". (USA Today)

In 2020, Ginsburg announced that she was facing pancreatic cancer again. She did not survive her fifth cancer battle which spread to her spleen and her liver.

When asked what she would want to be remembered for, Ginsburg made the statement, "I would like to be remembered as someone who used whatever talent she had to do her work to the very best of her ability." (Reader's Digest)

(Information from: History Channel "Ruth Bader Ginsburg", USA Today "Ginsburg V. Cancer Was A 'Remarkable Fight': RBG battled Five Bouts Of Cancer Over Two Decades", Reader's Digest "Ruth Bader Ginsburg", Stat News "Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Remarkable Life As A Cancer Survivor")
Source: Author exceller

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor ponycargirl before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
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