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Quiz about Hello This Is Alexander Graham Bell
Quiz about Hello This Is Alexander Graham Bell

Hello, This Is Alexander Graham Bell Quiz


Now where would we be without the telephone today? This is a quiz on the background and formative years of the man responsible for its later invention. Have fun.

A multiple-choice quiz by Creedy. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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  9. Alexander Graham Bell

Author
Creedy
Time
3 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
331,627
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
9 / 10
Plays
1368
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 136 (8/10), Johnmcmanners (10/10), Guest 129 (6/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. In which country was Bell born? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. When Alexander Bell was ten, he pleaded with his father to give him something that his two brothers had, but he himself did not. What was this? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Sadly, it was not a particularly strong family physically into which Bell had been born. His two brothers died young from which terrible illness, which was the plague of many people living in colder climates over the centuries? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Both Bell's wife, and which other member of his family, were profoundly deaf? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Remarkably, at the age of twelve, Bell, who was always interested in experimenting, created a machine that made work easier in a food producing mill owned by the parents of his best friend. What was this mill? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. In order to keep her informed of all that was happening in her little world, and as his mother's hearing deteriorated even further, Bell mastered the use of which method of communicating so that he could translate conversations to her. Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Bell was a poor student at school, because he simply wasn't interested in any subject but the sciences, and he left school at an early age. However, a great love of learning was later instilled in him after he spent a year living with whom? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Earlier, in 1863, Bell's father had taken his sons to see an invention of a automaton, designed by one Sir Charles Wheatsone, based on the work of Baron von Kemelen. This robot even had a simulated voice. Bell was totally fascinated and he and his older brother decided to build one of their own. Bell designed an apparatus for this home-grown robot that, when bellows forced air through its windpipe, a few words would issue forth. What was the first clear word Bell designed the robot to say? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. So intrigued was Bell by the success of the robot, that he then moved on to experiment on a family pet, attempting to train it to say a few words. What was this reluctant pet? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. One last fact on this brilliant man who gave us, along with many other inventions, the mighty telephone. Because this interfered with his concentration on other inventions and designs, who or what did Bell, at all times, absolutely refuse to have in his study? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Jun 19 2024 : Guest 136: 8/10
Jun 04 2024 : Johnmcmanners: 10/10
May 20 2024 : Guest 129: 6/10
May 01 2024 : Nala2: 8/10
Apr 25 2024 : Guest 96: 7/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. In which country was Bell born?

Answer: Scotland

Bell was born in Edinburgh in 1847, one of three sons, to Professor Alexander Bell and Eliza Grace née Symonds. His father was a noted teacher and researcher of physiological phonetics, which deals with the acoustic production of speech. It isn't too hard then to realise how his father's work impacted and influenced Bell's later interest in all aspects of sound.
2. When Alexander Bell was ten, he pleaded with his father to give him something that his two brothers had, but he himself did not. What was this?

Answer: A middle name

I think that's funny and so like a child to want to be the same as his brothers. Bell's two siblings were Melville James Bell and Edward Charles Bell. Bell himself, the middle son of the two was only baptised Alexander Bell. I imagine, with boys being boys, that his two brothers would have tormented him mercilessly about this, and so, by the age of ten, Bell had had enough and begged to have that extra name. Accordingly, in what obviously was a close and loving family, his parents, on his 11th birthday, ceremoniously allowed him to adopt the middle name Graham.

This came from Alexander Graham who was one of Dr Bell's patients and a close family friend.
3. Sadly, it was not a particularly strong family physically into which Bell had been born. His two brothers died young from which terrible illness, which was the plague of many people living in colder climates over the centuries?

Answer: Tuberculosis

Melville died in 1870, aged twenty-five, and Edward died in 1867 at the age of nineteen. By the time he himself was a young man, Bell's own health began to fall prey to that terrible illness and it was at that stage that his parents, grief-stricken at the loss of two of their sons, and in an effort to protect their remaining child, decided to relocate to live in Canada, a place were Bell's father, in an earlier sickness, found to be very beneficial for his own health.
4. Both Bell's wife, and which other member of his family, were profoundly deaf?

Answer: His mother

This once again, would prove a motivating factor on Bell's work. The research he carried out on hearing and speech would eventually lead him to the invention of the telephone, and he would go on to also become a noted teacher in institutions for the hearing impaired and an instructor of those who taught at these facilities. All his life, Bell was fascinated by the properties of sound.

For example, as a child, and interested in acoustics even at that age, he taught himself to play the piano, simply by concentrating intently on the differences in the acoustics of the notes, rather than reading them.

He became expert at copying all the different tones of people's voices and would perform amazing voice tricks to delight all who knew him, when the mood was upon him.

His father also taught the three boys to concentrate on sounds and the creation of symbols associated with each sound, rather than on visible writing of the words themselves. Bell became so proficient at this method that he occasionally took part in his father's lectures, astonishing audience with his grasp of many languages (including Gaelic and Sanskrit) simply by the use of matching symbols to sounds.
5. Remarkably, at the age of twelve, Bell, who was always interested in experimenting, created a machine that made work easier in a food producing mill owned by the parents of his best friend. What was this mill?

Answer: A flour mill

At the time, wheat was being dehusked in mills in what was a very laborious process. Because he played so often at the mill with his friend, Bell was an on the spot observer of this process. He gave it some thought, and at the astonishingly young age of twelve, invented a simple machine that dehusked the wheat far more easily.

This invention was used for years afterwards in the mill, and, as a reward, his friend's father gave both boys a workshop at the mill to carry out other experiments and inventions on various aspects of the world in which they lived, and which were so irresistible to Bell's insatiable curiosity.
6. In order to keep her informed of all that was happening in her little world, and as his mother's hearing deteriorated even further, Bell mastered the use of which method of communicating so that he could translate conversations to her.

Answer: Manual finger alphabet

This is so moving that it made me a bit tearful on reading it: For hours, Bell sat beside his mother every day, keeping her informed by this method, of the conversations taking place around her. He also developed, before she became completely deaf, his own method of conversing with her by modulating his voice so that its rise and fall was eliminated and the one steady and slow sound was spoken close to her forehead.

This awesome love and concern for his mother lit the way for Bell to study the world of acoustics.
7. Bell was a poor student at school, because he simply wasn't interested in any subject but the sciences, and he left school at an early age. However, a great love of learning was later instilled in him after he spent a year living with whom?

Answer: His grandfather

This year was spent living in London with his grandfather, Alexander Bell, and the two spent hours together every day in discussions and studies. It was here that the old man, who also had spent a lifetime working in the area of elocution and speech, taught his grandson his distinct method of clearly understood speech. From this impetus, Bell became a student-teacher and following this, he entered the University of Edinburgh.
8. Earlier, in 1863, Bell's father had taken his sons to see an invention of a automaton, designed by one Sir Charles Wheatsone, based on the work of Baron von Kemelen. This robot even had a simulated voice. Bell was totally fascinated and he and his older brother decided to build one of their own. Bell designed an apparatus for this home-grown robot that, when bellows forced air through its windpipe, a few words would issue forth. What was the first clear word Bell designed the robot to say?

Answer: Mama

So amazing. Bell was only 16 at that time. Their father also became highly intrigued by their project and bought all the equipment they requested, spuring them on by promising a large award if they succeeded. People came from miles around to see this new Bell invention, another step forward in Bell's lifelong devotion to the production of sound.
9. So intrigued was Bell by the success of the robot, that he then moved on to experiment on a family pet, attempting to train it to say a few words. What was this reluctant pet?

Answer: A dog

The family's pet dog was a Skye Terrier called Trouve. Bell firstly taught the dog to growl continually (I hate to imagine how) and he would then reach his fingers into the long-suffering animal's mouth and manipulate various parts of its mouth and vocal cords. Eventually he got the dog to produce something that sounded like "Ow ah oo ga ma ma" which Bell solemnly assured all the astounded visitors who came to see the "talking dog" were the words, "How are you, Grandma?" These entertaining, and highly amusing, early experiments with sound production led Bell on to begin his first serious experiments with sound production.

It was from this time onwards that he not only began to produce academic papers on the results of his findings, he concentrated much of his time as well on serious training and teaching and bringing easier communication to the world of the hearing impaired - and then eventually onto the telephone and many other follow up truly astonishing inventions.
10. One last fact on this brilliant man who gave us, along with many other inventions, the mighty telephone. Because this interfered with his concentration on other inventions and designs, who or what did Bell, at all times, absolutely refuse to have in his study?

Answer: A telephone

It's true, and very, very amusing for all of us who know how annoying the constant ringing of a telephone can be. But how comical is that fact? Bell went on to live a long and productive life, and always with the purpose of improving the life of mankind providing the motivating factor for his work.

He died in Nova Scotia in 1922 at the age of 75. As his funeral came to an end, "every telephone on the continent of North America was silenced in honour of the man who had given to mankind the means for direct communication at a distance." I think this great man gave the world much, much more than that.
Source: Author Creedy

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
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