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Quiz about Beauty Products in Ancient Rome
Quiz about Beauty Products in Ancient Rome

Beauty Products in Ancient Rome Quiz


Brace yourself. Based on some of the products used to enhance beauty back then, I'd personally rather stay plain. Have fun :)

A multiple-choice quiz by Creedy. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
Creedy
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
333,072
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
1594
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Linda_Arizona (9/10), Johnmcmanners (10/10), Guest 136 (7/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. Because Roman women tended to be rather dark in colouring, pure white skin was seen as highly desirable in the beauty stakes. Many products were used to achieve this, including which product from a crocodile? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Chemical peels today are usually achieved by trips to a beautician. In Roman Days however, women seeking the perfect facial and body texture and colour to their skins bathed in which product which had the same result as a chemical peel? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Wrinkles were a real no-no in Roman times. So what else is new I hear you ask? In an attempt to hold time at bay back then, anti-wrinkle creams were made by mixing up milk from more hard-working asses, bean-meal, Arabic gum - and the fat from which bird? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. What was used to get rid of pimples or acne back then? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Excess hair was also considered unattractive on Roman women. Older women, however, were made fun of if they removed excess body hair. Why was this? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Pale skin was desirable in a woman in Roman times, but a light tinge of pink on the cheeks was considered a sign of health. Rich women therefore used poppy leaves, among other products, for rouge, while poor women used the fruit of which tree? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. The fashion for beautiful eyes in Roman days was large, with long curling lashes. These long curling lashes were also considered a sign of what? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Eyeliner was normally made from kohl, usually by grinding up galena, a lead sulphide. It could, however, be made from which other more romantic product? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Ah, what a lovely image of the ideal Roman woman, to be sure. Pale skin, slightly pink cheeks, dark lustrous eyes, long curling eyelashes. We cannot leave out eyebrows, the frame for those beautiful eyes. What shape did the Romans prefer for women's eyebrows? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Lipstick didn't appear to be used in Roman times, but white teeth were considered desirable. False teeth, as a result, became very popular. These were made from which product? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Jul 20 2024 : Linda_Arizona: 9/10
Jul 15 2024 : Johnmcmanners: 10/10
Jun 19 2024 : Guest 136: 7/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Because Roman women tended to be rather dark in colouring, pure white skin was seen as highly desirable in the beauty stakes. Many products were used to achieve this, including which product from a crocodile?

Answer: Fresh dung

Dung it was indeed, carefully applied and allowed to dry. Other products used to achieve the dead white skin so prized included placenta, bile, animal urine, sulfur, vinegar, onions, eggs, ground oyster shells and white lead. Now and then a dash of honey or myrrh was thrown in for good measure. Roman men complained about the stench wafting forth from their women. So, women of the time usually followed up their beauty routine by dousing themselves with perfume to hide the aroma of these skin whitening products.
2. Chemical peels today are usually achieved by trips to a beautician. In Roman Days however, women seeking the perfect facial and body texture and colour to their skins bathed in which product which had the same result as a chemical peel?

Answer: Milk from asses

With emphasis on ass. Cleopatra and Poppaea Sabina (the second wife of Nero) are known figures from those days to use this product in their never-ending chase to maintain beauty.
3. Wrinkles were a real no-no in Roman times. So what else is new I hear you ask? In an attempt to hold time at bay back then, anti-wrinkle creams were made by mixing up milk from more hard-working asses, bean-meal, Arabic gum - and the fat from which bird?

Answer: Swans

How sad to think that beautiful swans were sacrificed in this manner. Comparatively speaking then, asses had it a lot easier. Their task was more like working in a nine to five job. The poor old swan's job, on the other hand, required a lifelong sacrifice.
4. What was used to get rid of pimples or acne back then?

Answer: Ashes of snails

Perceived blemishes included freckles, age spots, sunspots, sores or flaky skin. As a last resort, these little features standing in the way of true beauty were covered with tastefully designed leather patches and referred to as beauty spots. Criminals also took advantage of these leather patches - as did freedmen - to hide their brand marks.
5. Excess hair was also considered unattractive on Roman women. Older women, however, were made fun of if they removed excess body hair. Why was this?

Answer: Hair removal was seen as a prelude to sex

Hair removal procedure was not much different to what is still in use today. It was carried out either by plucking, shaving, removal with a type of resin glue (hot wax would be today's equivalent) or with a pumice stone.
6. Pale skin was desirable in a woman in Roman times, but a light tinge of pink on the cheeks was considered a sign of health. Rich women therefore used poppy leaves, among other products, for rouge, while poor women used the fruit of which tree?

Answer: Mulberry

For the rich, rouge could be made from the poppy, but also from a form of seaweed, rose petals, ground up ochre, mercury, red lead and red chalk - and crocodile dung. Poorer women, in addition to using mulberry fruit, also used the dregs from red wine. Roman writers, including Plutarch and Martial, had great fun in mocking women who used too much rouge, chortling that it made them look showy and it melted in the sun.
7. The fashion for beautiful eyes in Roman days was large, with long curling lashes. These long curling lashes were also considered a sign of what?

Answer: Chastity

Women tried many means, as a result of this belief, to maintain long eyelashes. The great Pliny the Elder, normally noted for his wisdom, wrote that eyelashes fell out from too much sex, and said that women should therefore try any means possible to keep their eyelashes looking long and lustrous to prove their virginity.
8. Eyeliner was normally made from kohl, usually by grinding up galena, a lead sulphide. It could, however, be made from which other more romantic product?

Answer: Charred rose petals

Kohl is still used in many Middle Eastern countries today for this purpose (eye-liner). It says today however that "the trend is to make it without poisonous ingredients". Back in Roman days, eye-liner, at a pinch, could also be made from soot, date stones and ground up antimony.

Some forms of antimony can actually explode if rubbed with a pestel in a mortar. Oh, and eyeshadow, particularly green eyeshadow, was made from malachite - which is also poisonous.
9. Ah, what a lovely image of the ideal Roman woman, to be sure. Pale skin, slightly pink cheeks, dark lustrous eyes, long curling eyelashes. We cannot leave out eyebrows, the frame for those beautiful eyes. What shape did the Romans prefer for women's eyebrows?

Answer: Dark, thick and almost meeting in the middle

After all that work getting the eyes right to please everybody, the women then had to paint on eyebrows. Roman women everywhere darkened, thickened and extended their eyebrows to meet in the middle, with soot - and more antimony. Fortunately, plucked dainty eyebrows came into fashion in 100 BCE.
10. Lipstick didn't appear to be used in Roman times, but white teeth were considered desirable. False teeth, as a result, became very popular. These were made from which product?

Answer: Bone

Bone it was, and sometimes ivory and paste. The Roman writer Ovid wrote that "You can do yourself untold damage when you laugh if your teeth are black, too long, or irregular." It's surprising they even had teeth left to be in that condition, what with all the lead being used. Ancient Romans also used a form of toothpaste as well.

This was made from a combination of pumice stone and baking soda. One presumes younger Romans did likewise.
Source: Author Creedy

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
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