Quiz about Pictures of People Taking Pictures
Quiz about Pictures of People Taking Pictures

Pictures of People Taking Pictures Quiz


Picture this: Ten descriptions of photographs of a photographer. Who are the ten that have moved from behind to in front of the lens?

A multiple-choice quiz by Snowman. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
Snowman
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
348,448
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
1498
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: bradez (2/10), rossian (10/10), Guest 106 (6/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. Picture this: A man stands in fashionable attire with a mountain vista behind him. To his left just wandering into the shot is one of his sister-in-law's corgis. Who is this photographer?
Hint

Everest
Lichfield
Snowdon
Ben Nevis

2. Picture this: A solarised photograph by Man Ray of his muse turned photographer standing in the rubble of the blitz. To her left is an ornate bathtub and to her right the statue of a poet. Who is this model turned photographer? Hint

Jean Shrimpton
Cindy Crawford
Lee Miller
Francoise Gilot

3. Picture this: A man stands surrounded by books. Sat on top of one pile is a tall hat with a price tag in the rim, reading "In this style 10/6", and in his right hand is something that may or may not be a Snark. Who is this photographer, better known as a novelist? Hint

Jozef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski aka Joseph Conrad
Clive Staples Lewis
Charles Lutwidge Dodgson aka Lewis Carroll
Samuel Langhorne Clemens aka Mark Twain

4. Picture this: The photograph has faded badly but the man in the middle is still clearly visible. He looks a little bored but is dressed in the height of mid-19th century fashion and holding a plate with a silver surface that reflects the bright light of the sun. The photograph may well be the oldest one still in existence. Who is its subject? Hint

Louis Daguerre
George Eastman
William Bell
John Herschel

5. Picture this: An elegantly-dressed bright young thing stands outside a theatre, parading the wares that were very much in vogue at the time. In contrast to his elegant attire, in his right hand, the man carries a very tatty teddy bear that looks like it has been through the wars. Who is this photographer, who was also an Oscar-winning set designer? Hint

Cecil B DeMille
Cecil Beaton
Cedric Gibbons
David Bailey

6. Picture this: A candid shot of an elegant man on a Parisian street captured in a decisive moment. In his left hand is a 35mm camera painted entirely in black, while his right hand grasps a magnum of champagne. Who is this champion of photojournalism who was inspired by the surrealists to approach photography in an entirely new way? Hint

Henri Cartier-Bresson
Martin Munkacsi
Man Ray
David Seymour

7. Picture this: A woman is surrounded by animals though none are on the plate of food beside her. With her left hand she is playing the piano and in her right she holds a camera that clearly bears the name "Eastman Kodak". Who is the woman featured? Hint

Annie Leibovitz
Yoko Ono
Margaret Bourke-White
Linda McCartney

8. Picture this: A man is doing his utmost to hide from view but his shining visage is still clear to be seen. Under his arm are three books, whose spines show they are classics of the literary world by Nabokov, Burgess and Thackeray. Who is this photographer turned film-maker that would rather avoid the glare of the lens? Hint

Francis Ford Coppola
Stanley Kubrick
Sidney Lumet
Jonathan Demme

9. Picture this. As this is a family site, there have to be several strategically placed objects in the frame. And some judicious blurring. For there are no clothes to be seen anywhere in this shot even though there is a very large number of people in the background. Who is the subject of the shot, a man responsible for more public nudity than the Woodstock festival? Hint

Aaron Siskind
Robert Mapplethorpe
Spencer Tunick
Ansel Adams

10. Picture this: Behind this woman is a large boulder with no moss on it. Behind that are several more the same. Stacked in front of her are piles of album sleeves featuring some of the most iconic figures from over 40 years of rock music and to her left is a modest nude picture of a very pregnant movie star. Who is this portrait photographer? Hint

Eve Arnold
Diane Arbus
Cindy Sherman
Annie Leibovitz


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Picture this: A man stands in fashionable attire with a mountain vista behind him. To his left just wandering into the shot is one of his sister-in-law's corgis. Who is this photographer?

Answer: Snowdon

The corgis belong to Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain, who first kept the Welsh dogs as a teenager. Her sister, Princess Margaret, was married to Anthony Armstrong-Jones, 1st Earl of Snowdon from 1960 until their divorce in 1978. The Earldom was created for him upon his marriage and is named for the highest peak in Wales, Armstrong-Jones ancestral home.

Professionally, Armstrong-Jones is simply known as Snowdon. His career has seen him work in fashion photography and photo-journalism but he is most noted for his portraiture, not least of members of the royal family.
2. Picture this: A solarised photograph by Man Ray of his muse turned photographer standing in the rubble of the blitz. To her left is an ornate bathtub and to her right the statue of a poet. Who is this model turned photographer?

Answer: Lee Miller

Elizabeth Lee Miller's first exposure to photography came from her father, Theodore, a keen amateur who frequently used his daughter as a model. She became a professional model after a chance encounter with magazine publisher Condé Nast, who saved her from being run over in New York.

Miller moved to Paris in the late 1920s with the intention of working with Man Ray, a leading name in the Surrealist movement. Though initially reluctant, Ray took her on as his assistant and she was soon running his fashion photography studio. At this time, the two developed the technique of solarisation, where the dark and light tones developed from a photographic negative are reversed. During her time in Paris she also appeared in Jean Cocteau's 1930 film, "The Blood of a Poet" in which she played a living statue.

After leaving Ray in the 1930s, Miller withdrew from the professional side of photography and twice married. Now living in the UK, Miller returned to the profession as a photojournalist with the outbreak of World War II in Europe. She became war correspondent for "Vogue" and published numerous pieces in "Life" magazine. One of the most famous photographs of this period was of, not by, Miller. It showed her reclining in Hitler's bathtub in Munich following the end of the war.
3. Picture this: A man stands surrounded by books. Sat on top of one pile is a tall hat with a price tag in the rim, reading "In this style 10/6", and in his right hand is something that may or may not be a Snark. Who is this photographer, better known as a novelist?

Answer: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson aka Lewis Carroll

The hat, of course, belongs to the Hatter from "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland", the 1865 novel for which Dodgson, as Lewis Carroll, is best known. Dodgson was an early adopter of the new technology of photography in the mid-1850s and his expertise in it soon gained him a positive reputation. Among the subjects of his remaining portraits (approximately two-thirds of his total collection is lost), was a young girl by the name of Alice Liddell, daughter of the Dean of Christ Church, Oxford, with whom Dogdson had struck up a friendship. The story of "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" originated in a request from Alice to write down the tales that Dodgson made up to entertain her and her sisters.

"The Hunting of the Snark" was a nonsense poem by Lewis Carroll that told a story of a expedition to find an unknown and undiscoverable being.
4. Picture this: The photograph has faded badly but the man in the middle is still clearly visible. He looks a little bored but is dressed in the height of mid-19th century fashion and holding a plate with a silver surface that reflects the bright light of the sun. The photograph may well be the oldest one still in existence. Who is its subject?

Answer: Louis Daguerre

Louis Daguerre was one of the pioneers of photography with his development, in 1838, of the daguerrotype. The initial daguerrotype process worked by exposing light onto the silver-foiled surface of a copper plate, after the surface had been treated with iodine vapour.

A positive image was then created by developing the plate with mercury. The light exposure required by the early version of this process was approximately ten minutes for a single image, so a picture taken by this method would only display non-moving objects, hence the bored look on Daguerre's face.
5. Picture this: An elegantly-dressed bright young thing stands outside a theatre, parading the wares that were very much in vogue at the time. In contrast to his elegant attire, in his right hand, the man carries a very tatty teddy bear that looks like it has been through the wars. Who is this photographer, who was also an Oscar-winning set designer?

Answer: Cecil Beaton

A member of the international best dressed hall of fame, Cecil Beaton achieved great success in multiple fields. He was taken on by "Vogue" magazine early in his photographic career and his photos of the Bright Young Things of the 1920s earned him attention. He became a sought after fashion photographer and portraitist, shooting such luminaries as Winston Churchill and the British royal family.

Despite being best known for shooting the rich and famous, Beaton also created some memorable images of the British public during World War II, in his role as an official photographer for the Ministry of War. One particularly striking image was of a three-year old victim of a German bomb, as she lay in her hospital bed with her head heavily bandaged, clutching her beloved but battered teddy bear. The image went right around the world and spread the word about the suffering that the British public was enduring. It was particularly aimed at mobilising public feeling in the United States, who were not involved in the war at that time.

After the war, he turned his attention to stage design and soon was recruited by the film industry to do the same for them. He won two Academy Awards for set design, for the musicals "Gigi" in 1959 and "My Fair Lady" six years later.
6. Picture this: A candid shot of an elegant man on a Parisian street captured in a decisive moment. In his left hand is a 35mm camera painted entirely in black, while his right hand grasps a magnum of champagne. Who is this champion of photojournalism who was inspired by the surrealists to approach photography in an entirely new way?

Answer: Henri Cartier-Bresson

Cartier-Bresson is known in some quarters as the father of modern photojournalism. His style was informed by his fraternisation with the Surrealists when he was trying to eke a living as a painter. Their view that the mechanisms of thought could be more clearly revealed by capturing unrehearsed moments in time, led Cartier-Bresson to approach photography with the idea of capturing "The Decisive Moment", a phrase that was used for the title of his 1952 collection of photographs. In order to prevent his subjects posing and obfuscating the truth of the moment, Cartier-Bresson would paint all the metal parts of his camera black, so that it could remain unnoticed.

In 1947, Cartier-Bresson was one of the co-founders of the co-operative picture agency, Magnum Photos. Magnum's intention was to transcribe events from around the world in photographs. Cartier-Bresson's part was to cover central and eastern Asia. The co-operative has built up a portfolio of hundreds of thousands of pictures from all parts of the world and its roster of photographers has grown to include members from dozens of countries covering all the world's continents.
7. Picture this: A woman is surrounded by animals though none are on the plate of food beside her. With her left hand she is playing the piano and in her right she holds a camera that clearly bears the name "Eastman Kodak". Who is the woman featured?

Answer: Linda McCartney

Though she was born Linda Eastman in 1941 and despite her career as a photographer, Linda McCartney was no relation to George Eastman, the founder of photographic giant, Eastman Kodak. She gained fame as a photographer through her portraits of famous rock stars of the 1960s. However, it was through marrying one such star, The Beatles' Paul McCartney, that she gained her greatest fame. After The Beatles split, Paul formed the band Wings and Linda became its keyboard player, despite having no background in music.

She gained fame in a third field with the release of her vegetarian cookbook in 1989, which was soon followed by a range of vegetarian ready meals, a business that her husband continued after her death.
8. Picture this: A man is doing his utmost to hide from view but his shining visage is still clear to be seen. Under his arm are three books, whose spines show they are classics of the literary world by Nabokov, Burgess and Thackeray. Who is this photographer turned film-maker that would rather avoid the glare of the lens?

Answer: Stanley Kubrick

Though his greatest fame now lies with his career as a filmmaker, Kubrick started out as a photographer for "Look" magazine as a teenager. In his early twenties, he began his first forays into film with a series of documentaries. His skill with lighting, learned from photography, made him perfectly suited to film-making and when he moved into feature films with "The Killing" (1956) and "Paths of Glory" (1957), his cinematography became widely admired and hugely influential.

Kubrick was also a great writer and a lover of literature. Many of his films were adaptations of literary classics, such as "Lolita" by Nabokov in 1962, Burgess' "A Clockwork Orange" in 1971 and Thackeray's "Barry Lyndon" in 1975. He also turned his hand effectively to the horror novel with his 1980 film of Stephen King's "The Shining" being held up by Martin Scorsese as "like no horror film ever made... essentially unclassifiable, endlessly provocative and profoundly disturbing."
9. Picture this. As this is a family site, there have to be several strategically placed objects in the frame. And some judicious blurring. For there are no clothes to be seen anywhere in this shot even though there is a very large number of people in the background. Who is the subject of the shot, a man responsible for more public nudity than the Woodstock festival?

Answer: Spencer Tunick

Tunick is famed for photographing nudes in public places, particularly those that involve large numbers of subjects, forming what has been described as "living sculpture". The first of these was a collection of 28 men and women posing naked in front of the United Nations in New York. Since then he has photographed scenes in many locations around the world including Selfridges in London, a vineyard in Macon, France and outside the State Opera House in Munich.

Some of these installations have featured over 1000 nude models.
10. Picture this: Behind this woman is a large boulder with no moss on it. Behind that are several more the same. Stacked in front of her are piles of album sleeves featuring some of the most iconic figures from over 40 years of rock music and to her left is a modest nude picture of a very pregnant movie star. Who is this portrait photographer?

Answer: Annie Leibovitz

The boulders refer to Leibovitz's working relationships both with "Rolling Stone" magazine, for whom she took photos for more than two decades, and with The Rolling Stones, for whom she was the official photographer on one of their 1970s tours of the United States.

Leibovitz's work with Rolling Stone saw her photograph many of the legends of popular music in the 1970s and 1980s including a famous portrait of John Lennon and Yoko Ono taken just days before Lennon's murder in 1980. Leibovitz also took a number of controversial photos in her time, not least of a partially unclad 15-year-old Miley Cyrus and a totally unclad and pregnant Demi Moore for the cover of "Vanity Fair" in 1991.
Source: Author Snowman

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
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Related Quizzes
This quiz is part of series The Eyes Behind the Camera:

A few quizzes about famous photographers.

  1. Philippe Halsman: Photographer and Subjects Average
  2. Photo Finish Average
  3. Pictures of People Taking Pictures Average
  4. Famous Photographers of History Tough
  5. Ansel Adams: The Man Behind the Camera Average
  6. Nadar, 19th-century photographer, Impressionist fr Average
  7. One Hour Photo Tough
  8. The Man Called Man Ray Average

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