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Quiz about Oh No  Persecution
Quiz about Oh No  Persecution

Oh No! Persecution! Trivia Quiz


Religious persecution has taken place throughout history. This quiz is about some of those who have suffered and often paid the ultimate price for their beliefs. Note - some UK bias.

A multiple-choice quiz by rossian. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
rossian
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
350,297
Updated
May 11 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
1242
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: gracious1 (8/10), Guest 172 (6/10), slay01 (10/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. This early Church reformer was born in Bohemia in around 1370 and was burned at the stake for heresy in 1415. Which of these was he? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Thomas Cranmer was executed in 1556 on the orders of Queen Mary I of England. What position did Cranmer hold? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Saints Sebastian, George and Agnes were all martyred during the last great Roman persecution of Christians in the late third and early fourth centuries. Which Roman Emperor was responsible for the purge? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Maximilian Kolbe was canonised in 1982 after sacrificing his life to save that of another man in which Nazi concentration camp? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. The character of Job is well known for his sufferings in the Bible. His story also appears in Islam, which teaches that he underwent similar afflictions.


Question 6 of 10
6. All of these men were sentenced to death by order of King Henry VIII of England. Which one was convicted of heresy and was canonised by the Catholic Church in recognition of his allegiance to the Pope? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. St. Mark, the apostle and author of the Gospel, is believed to have been martyred in which Egyptian city? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Missionary Thomas Baker was killed and eaten on the island of Viti Levu in 1867. In which island nation did this occur? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. John Ball was executed in 1381 for his part in the Peasants' Revolt. He was a priest in which religious movement? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Thomas Becket was murdered in Canterbury Cathedral as a result of his conflict with which king of England? Hint



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Jun 11 2024 : gracious1: 8/10
May 15 2024 : Guest 172: 6/10
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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. This early Church reformer was born in Bohemia in around 1370 and was burned at the stake for heresy in 1415. Which of these was he?

Answer: Jan Hus

In English speaking countries, Hus is usually referred to as John Huss. He was an ordained priest at the time when there were two claimants to the papacy, from Rome, in Italy and Avignon, in France. Huss preached against various abuses of Church power, among them the sale of indulgences by one claimant to raise money for a war against his rivals. Huss was ordered by the Council of Constance to recant certain doctrines which were considered to be heretical.

He refused to do so because he had never taught them and would not recant something he had not done. Huss was consequently found guilty and executed. Wycliffe was an English reformer who lived from around 1328 - 1384 and who influenced Huss, and Luther was a German reformer born in 1483. Calvin was French, and promoted reformation of the church in the sixteenth century.
2. Thomas Cranmer was executed in 1556 on the orders of Queen Mary I of England. What position did Cranmer hold?

Answer: Archbishop of Canterbury

Cranmer had been instrumental in finding the means for Henry VIII to divorce Catherine of Aragon, the mother of Mary I. In addition, England had been Protestant since Henry's split with Rome and Cranmer had been Archbishop of Canterbury throughout this time.

He had also supported the accession of Lady Jane Grey, known as the nine days' queen, to the throne in accordance with the dying wishes of King Edward VI. Mary I was a staunch Catholic, so Cranmer had offended her in many different ways. Although he initially recanted his part in the Reformation, he then withdrew the recantations and was burned at the stake in 1556.
3. Saints Sebastian, George and Agnes were all martyred during the last great Roman persecution of Christians in the late third and early fourth centuries. Which Roman Emperor was responsible for the purge?

Answer: Diocletian

The Diocletianic, or Great, Persecution was the most severe of several attempts by the Romans to eradicate Christianity. The purge was at its worst in the eastern part of the empire, with the western areas, including Britain and Gaul (now France) escaping relatively lightly. St. Sebastian died in 288 AD, St. George (of dragon fame) died in 303 and St. Agnes in 304, at the age of only thirteen.

The Roman Empire officially embraced Christianity in 313 when Constantine I issued the Edict of Milan.
4. Maximilian Kolbe was canonised in 1982 after sacrificing his life to save that of another man in which Nazi concentration camp?

Answer: Auschwitz

Kolbe was born in 1894 in Poland and became a Franciscan friar in 1910. Following the German invasion of Poland, he sheltered many refugees, including Jews, in the friary and was eventually arrested in 1941. Following a prisoner escape from Auschwitz, ten men were chosen at random to be starved to death in retaliation.

When one of the chosen men cried out in despair, Kolbe volunteered to take his place. The ten men were left to their fate, with Kolbe praying and encouraging them. Kolbe himself was still alive after two weeks of this inhumane treatment and was eventually despatched by a lethal injection of carbolic acid.

He was canonised as a martyr in 1981 by Pope John Paul II.
5. The character of Job is well known for his sufferings in the Bible. His story also appears in Islam, which teaches that he underwent similar afflictions.

Answer: True

In the Old Testament of the Bible, Job is described as a righteous man who has his protection removed by God, thus allowing Satan to cause him numerous problems. Job's belief in God never wavers and he eventually has everything he has lost restored to him.

In the Koran, Job is recognised as a prophet, and his story is very similar to the Biblical version, with Job remaining steadfast in his devotion to Allah.
6. All of these men were sentenced to death by order of King Henry VIII of England. Which one was convicted of heresy and was canonised by the Catholic Church in recognition of his allegiance to the Pope?

Answer: Thomas More

Henry VIII had declared himself head of the Church in England, and required that all members of his court should swear an oath agreeing to the Acts of Supremacy and Succession. More refused to do so and was executed in 1535 by beheading. His opposition to the Protestant Reformation led to his being canonised by Pope Pius XI in 1935 as a Reformation Martyr. Stafford was executed in 1521, accused of treason, mainly as he was a threat to Henry as a rival claimant to the throne. Boleyn was beheaded in 1536 having been found guilty of incest with his sister, the queen. Cromwell lost his life in 1540, accused of heresy due to his links with the Lutheran movement.

He had fallen out of favour with the king having promoted the marriage to Anne of Cleves for political reasons.
7. St. Mark, the apostle and author of the Gospel, is believed to have been martyred in which Egyptian city?

Answer: Alexandria

Mark was born in the North African city of Cyrene, now part of Libya (according to most sources) and was the author of the first Gospel to be written, which was in the Greek language. He is said to have founded the Church of Alexandria in around 49 AD and became its first bishop. Mark incurred the wrath of the followers of the pagan god, Serapis, who killed him in 68 AD by tying him to a horse's tail and dragging him around the streets of the city. Damascus is in Syria and Tripoli is the capital of Libya. Cairo is the largest city and capital of Egypt.
8. Missionary Thomas Baker was killed and eaten on the island of Viti Levu in 1867. In which island nation did this occur?

Answer: Fiji

Viti Levu is the largest island of the Republic of Fiji, and the nation's capital of Suva is situated on the island. Baker had been working as a missionary in Fiji since 1859, and set out to preach to the natives in the western part of the island on the fatal day.

In addition to Baker himself, seven of his Fijian followers were also killed and cannibalised. A reconciliation ceremony took place in 2003 on the island between descendents of Thomas Baker and those of his killers.
9. John Ball was executed in 1381 for his part in the Peasants' Revolt. He was a priest in which religious movement?

Answer: Lollards

The Lollards were followers of the teachings of John Wycliffe, who proposed reformation of the Roman Catholic Church, which they perceived to be corrupt. The Peasants' Revolt was not, however, a religious revolt but a rebellion against feudalism in England, which meant that the lower classes had no chance of advancement. John Ball had been imprisoned for his teachings, and was released by the rebels, who he joined.

His most famous speech included the words 'When Adam delved and Eve span, who was then the gentleman?' Ball was arrested and tried before being hanged, drawn and quartered.

The Huguenots were a French Protestant movement from the sixteenth and seventeenth century. The Puritans and Calvinists were also Protestant movements.
10. Thomas Becket was murdered in Canterbury Cathedral as a result of his conflict with which king of England?

Answer: Henry II

Becket was born around 1120 and was appointed as Lord Chancellor to Henry II in 1155. In this role, he proved able and worked for the interests of the monarch. In 1162 Becket was appointed as Archbishop of Canterbury, and transferred his allegiance to the church, thus putting him in direct conflict with the monarchy.

Henry allowed his frustrations to be known, leading to four knights of the realm to attack and murder Becket in his own cathedral in 1170. He was canonised as a martyr by Pope Alexander III in 1173, and is still venerated in the twenty-first century.
Source: Author rossian

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor CellarDoor before going online.
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