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Quiz about Theology  The Trinity
Quiz about Theology  The Trinity

Theology : The Trinity Trivia Quiz


Joe Friday here, and I'm interested in the facts, just the facts, about the doctrine of the Trinity and the controversy that surrounded it in 325 AD. If you find any of the author's opinions in this quiz, notify the author. They will be removed.

A multiple-choice quiz by uglybird. Estimated time: 7 mins.
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Author
uglybird
Time
7 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
172,779
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Difficult
Avg Score
5 / 10
Plays
4050
Last 3 plays: Guest 24 (5/10), Guest 194 (7/10), Guest 173 (8/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. "I'm Joe Friday and I'm here to question the not so notable theologian, Tertullian Theophilus Ebenezer. Professor Ebenezer, how many times does the word "Trinity" appear in the Bible? Remember, Professor, just the facts." What is the correct answer to Friday's question? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Friday: "Thanks, Professor, for that clarification. Now, back in 325 AD a controversy arose that forced a church council called the Council of Nicaea. A letter from Arius to what other person started the controversy?" What answer should the professor give to this question? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Friday: "The documents in our possession indicate that Arius seized on verses in the Bible that Arius felt indicated that the Son was begotten. Arius said that this implied that the Son was created. But we can't figure out where the Word fits into all of this. Can you help us, Professor?" What should the professor say that Arius taught? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Friday: "Arius maintained that the Son was a created being. Did Arius teach that the Holy Spirit was also a created being?" How should the professor answer?


Question 5 of 10
5. Friday: "Professor, I understand that an important part of the issue involved whether or not the Father and the Son actually consisted of the same substance. Is it true that the Greek term for consubstantiality differed from the term for mere similarity by only a single iota (iota being a Greek letter)?" Should the professor answer yes or no?


Question 6 of 10
6. Friday: "Professor, my informants tell me that letters were written to Emperor Constantine, regarding the conflict between Arius, who held that the Son was less God than the Father, and those opposing his view. We also have reason to think you are familiar with the letter Constantine wrote to one Eusebius, expressing his opinion as to the conduct of those involved in the dispute. What did the Emperor Constantine say on this topic?" What should the professor report Constantine as saying? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Friday: "So, Professor, the conflict won't die down, and Constantine summons all the Bishops of the Church to meet with him at Nicaea. He even agrees to pay their expenses. We have accounts saying that at least 318 Bishops showed up. Arius insisted that the Son was a created being and 'divine only by participation.' When it came to a vote, exactly how many bishops supported Arius?" How should the professor answer this question? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Friday: "Professor, we have a copy of a document drawn up at the Council of Nicea called the Nicene Creed. It's common knowledge that Arius refused to sign it. Exactly how many other bishops also refused?" What should the professor answer? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Friday: "We've found mention in certain Catholic documents of someone termed, 'the shifty prelate of Nicomedia.' Apparently, this refers to one Eusebius, who is alleged to have baptized Emperor Constantine near the time of his death. Did this Eusebius refuse to sign the Nicene Creed?" How should the Professor answer this time?


Question 10 of 10
10. Friday: "This wasn't the end of Arius' views, was it Professor? How was it that the famous historian Will Durant described it: "the most challenging heresy in the history of the Church?" Isn't that what Durant said, Professor?" How should the professor answer?



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Most Recent Scores
May 26 2024 : Guest 24: 5/10
May 26 2024 : Guest 194: 7/10
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Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. "I'm Joe Friday and I'm here to question the not so notable theologian, Tertullian Theophilus Ebenezer. Professor Ebenezer, how many times does the word "Trinity" appear in the Bible? Remember, Professor, just the facts." What is the correct answer to Friday's question?

Answer: 0

"Professor Ebenezer here. Just for the record, some of the other terms that do not appear in the Bible are: cardinal virtues, transubstantiation, faith plus nothing, and continuous revelation."
2. Friday: "Thanks, Professor, for that clarification. Now, back in 325 AD a controversy arose that forced a church council called the Council of Nicaea. A letter from Arius to what other person started the controversy?" What answer should the professor give to this question?

Answer: Alexander

Professor Ebenezer: "Arius held that since the Son was begotten of the Father, the begetting must have occurred in time. This would imply that the Son was not co-eternal. Additionally, Arius maintained that the Son was created from nothing and was not, therefore, of the same substance as the Father."
3. Friday: "The documents in our possession indicate that Arius seized on verses in the Bible that Arius felt indicated that the Son was begotten. Arius said that this implied that the Son was created. But we can't figure out where the Word fits into all of this. Can you help us, Professor?" What should the professor say that Arius taught?

Answer: That the Father created the Son through the power of the Word.

Professor Ebenezer: "The Nicene Creed made a distinction between making and begetting. The creed states that the Son 'was begotten not made.'"
4. Friday: "Arius maintained that the Son was a created being. Did Arius teach that the Holy Spirit was also a created being?" How should the professor answer?

Answer: Yes

Professor Ebenezer: "Arius maintained that the Son created the Holy Spirit. Arius reasoned that since the Spirit was created, the Spirit also was of a substance different from that of the Father."
5. Friday: "Professor, I understand that an important part of the issue involved whether or not the Father and the Son actually consisted of the same substance. Is it true that the Greek term for consubstantiality differed from the term for mere similarity by only a single iota (iota being a Greek letter)?" Should the professor answer yes or no?

Answer: Yes

Professor Ebenezer: "The controversy became so heated that Eusebius of Caeserea, who lived at the time, described it as a 'tumult and disorder.' Eusebius expressed concern that the conflict, 'afforded a subject of profane merriment to the pagans.'"
6. Friday: "Professor, my informants tell me that letters were written to Emperor Constantine, regarding the conflict between Arius, who held that the Son was less God than the Father, and those opposing his view. We also have reason to think you are familiar with the letter Constantine wrote to one Eusebius, expressing his opinion as to the conduct of those involved in the dispute. What did the Emperor Constantine say on this topic?" What should the professor report Constantine as saying?

Answer: "These are silly actions worthy of inexperienced children."

Professor Ebenezer: "The furor did not die down after Constantine's letter. In fact, it was Constantine who called the first universal council of the Church.
7. Friday: "So, Professor, the conflict won't die down, and Constantine summons all the Bishops of the Church to meet with him at Nicaea. He even agrees to pay their expenses. We have accounts saying that at least 318 Bishops showed up. Arius insisted that the Son was a created being and 'divine only by participation.' When it came to a vote, exactly how many bishops supported Arius?" How should the professor answer this question?

Answer: 17

Professor Ebenezer: "The Emperor himself presided. The Pope didn't come, saying illness detained him. Arius was from Egypt, and most of the controversy was in the Eastern half of the Roman Empire. Because the western bishops felt the confilict to be an eastern problem, most of the western bishops did not attend."
8. Friday: "Professor, we have a copy of a document drawn up at the Council of Nicea called the Nicene Creed. It's common knowledge that Arius refused to sign it. Exactly how many other bishops also refused?" What should the professor answer?

Answer: 2

Professor Ebenezer: "There were five bishops that refused to sign intially, but ultimately only 2. They were anathematized (just a polite way of saying cursed) and exiled. The mere possession of a book by Arius was decreed punishable by death."
9. Friday: "We've found mention in certain Catholic documents of someone termed, 'the shifty prelate of Nicomedia.' Apparently, this refers to one Eusebius, who is alleged to have baptized Emperor Constantine near the time of his death. Did this Eusebius refuse to sign the Nicene Creed?" How should the Professor answer this time?

Answer: No

Professor Ebenezer: "Eusebius of Nicomedia signed, but later repudiated his signature of the Nicene Creed. He became a favored counselor of Constantine. An Arian therefore baptized Constantine the Great.
10. Friday: "This wasn't the end of Arius' views, was it Professor? How was it that the famous historian Will Durant described it: "the most challenging heresy in the history of the Church?" Isn't that what Durant said, Professor?" How should the professor answer?

Answer: Yes

Professor Ebenezer: "The Goths accepted an Arian form of Christianity and transmitted it to other barbarians. By the time Rome was in decline, virtually all the barbarian tribes that repeatedly invaded Italy and sacked Rome were Arian. Some historians hold that the inability of the invaders to be assimilated into Roman society because of their Arianism contributed to the ultimate fall of the empire."
Source: Author uglybird

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor ArleneRimmer before going online.
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