Quiz about Hand Me a Constellation
Quiz about Hand Me a Constellation

Hand Me a Constellation Trivia Quiz


This quiz will focus on constellations that resemble inanimate objects. Each sentence will ask for a specific item indicated by quotations. Match it with the name of a constellation that resembles that item.

A matching quiz by RedHook13. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
RedHook13
Time
4 mins
Type
Match Quiz
Quiz #
409,526
Updated
Jul 22 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
175
Last 3 plays: Upstart3 (10/10), Guest 174 (1/10), pehinhota (10/10).
Mobile instructions: Press on an answer on the right. Then, press on the gray box it matches on the left.
(a) Drag-and-drop from the right to the left, or (b) click on a right side answer box and then on a left side box to move it.
QuestionsChoices
1. Do you have a "clock" I can use, so that I can keep track of time?  
Horologium
2. I've got my paints ready. Now all I need is an "easel" to create my masterpiece.  
Lyra
3. My bike needs some air in its tires. Can you find me a "pump" to use?  
Pictor
4. I'm jousting at the Renaissance Fair today. I've got my lance. Now I need a "shield".  
Crater
5. May I borrow your "chisel" so that I can do some woodcarving?  
Antlia
6. I need to buy a "furnace" to help keep me warm. It's freezing in here!  
Scutum
7. Could you hand me my "harp" please? I'd like to play a song for you.  
Pyxis
8. I brought a bow to go hunting with. Do you have an "arrow" to spare?  
Sagitta
9. We're not lost! I just need to use a "compass" and we'll be on our way home.  
Fornax
10. I'm thirsty. Could you bring me a "cup" of water, please?  
Caelum






Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Do you have a "clock" I can use, so that I can keep track of time?

Answer: Horologium

Horologium is a constellation found in the southern celestial hemisphere. It was named in 1756 by French astronomer Nicolas-Louis de Lacaille. He observed the constellation from the Cape of Good Hope in what is now the country of South Africa. It was described by de Lacaille as a "clock with a pendulum and seconds hand". Thus, the constellation was given the name Horologium which is the Latin word for clock.
2. I've got my paints ready. Now all I need is an "easel" to create my masterpiece.

Answer: Pictor

The constellation Pictor was also first observed by Nicolas-Louis de Lacaille in 1756. It was initially given the name Equuleus Pictoris "the Painter's Easel", but the name was shortened to simply Pictor. The shortened form of the name may intentionally be a misnomer most likely because there is not an equivalent Latin term for easel. Equuleus is Latin for "Little Horse" and was already the name of a constellation.

The word pictor in Latin means painter. Pictor can be found in the southern celestial hemisphere.
3. My bike needs some air in its tires. Can you find me a "pump" to use?

Answer: Antlia

Antlia is yet another constellation to be named by French astronomer Nicolas-Louis de Lacaille. He has been credited with the naming of fourteen constellations in the southern celestial hemisphere and named all of them after inanimate objects. Antlia was initially given the name Antlia Pneumatica "Pneumatic (air) Pump" and was later shortened to simply Antlia.
4. I'm jousting at the Renaissance Fair today. I've got my lance. Now I need a "shield".

Answer: Scutum

Scutum is a constellation found in the southern celestial hemisphere. Scutum was first observed by Polish astronomer Johannes Hevelius in 1684. The constellation was originally given the Latin name Scutum Sobiescianum "Shield of Sobieski". The name was chosen in honor of Polish king John III Sobieski, who had led his faction to victory in the Battle of Vienna a year before the constellation's founding.
5. May I borrow your "chisel" so that I can do some woodcarving?

Answer: Caelum

Caelum is another southern celestial hemisphere constellation to have been observed by Nicolas-Louis de Lacaille during his stay near the Cape of Good Hope. This one was initially given the name Caelum Sculptorium "the Engravers' Chisel", and was later shortened to just Caelum.
6. I need to buy a "furnace" to help keep me warm. It's freezing in here!

Answer: Fornax

Fornax, yet another of Nicolas-Louis de Lacaille's observations, is the shortened form of the name Fornax Chimiae "the Chemical Furnace". It can also be found in the southern celestial hemisphere. The Fornax constellation has given astronomers a glimpse into some of the oldest objects in the universe.

The Hubble Space Telescope has obtained images in this region of space with stars and galaxies that may have been formed approximately 13 billion years ago.
7. Could you hand me my "harp" please? I'd like to play a song for you.

Answer: Lyra

Lyra is one of 48 constellations documented by the Roman astronomer Ptolemy. It was named after the harp of Orpheus, a legendary Greek musician. Lyra is found in the northern celestial hemisphere. Its most prominent star, Vega (α Lyrae) used to be the North Star over 12,000 years ago, before Polaris moved to its current position in the sky. Vega is expected to become the North Star again in about 14,000 years from now.
8. I brought a bow to go hunting with. Do you have an "arrow" to spare?

Answer: Sagitta

Sagitta, "the Arrow" is another constellation that was documented by Ptolemy. It can be found in the northern celestial hemisphere. Despite its name it has no physical connection to the zodiac constellation Sagittarius, "the Archer", which is located in the southern celestial hemisphere.
9. We're not lost! I just need to use a "compass" and we'll be on our way home.

Answer: Pyxis

Pyxis is another southern hemisphere constellation to be documented by Nicolas-Louis de Lacaille. It was originally named Pyxis Nautica "the mariner's compass". Pyxis is located near three constellations that used to form the defunct Argo Nevis constellation, which was named for the ship used by Jason and the Argonauts in Greek mythology. Argo Nevis was split into three separate constellations in 1930: Carina (the keel), Puppis (the stern) and Vela (the sails), which were also proposed by de Lacaille in 1756.
10. I'm thirsty. Could you bring me a "cup" of water, please?

Answer: Crater

The constellation Crater is located in the southern celestial hemisphere and takes the form of a cup. It is another of the 48 constellations that were first listed by Ptolemy. Crater can be found riding on the back of Hydra, "the Sea Serpent".
Source: Author RedHook13

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor rossian before going online.
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Most Recent Scores
Jan 21 2023 : Upstart3: 10/10
Jan 20 2023 : Guest 174: 1/10
Jan 20 2023 : pehinhota: 10/10
Jan 03 2023 : Guest 207: 2/10
Dec 30 2022 : Ampelos: 8/10

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