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Quiz about That Doesnt Look Like Me
Quiz about That Doesnt Look Like Me

That Doesn't Look Like Me! Trivia Quiz


Various parts of our bodies have names that are also other things we know in the world. Can you figure out what body parts these are with their visual homonymic counterparts?

A photo quiz by reedy. Estimated time: 2 mins.
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Author
reedy
Time
2 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
402,443
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Very Easy
Avg Score
10 / 10
Plays
1735
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 24 (10/10), Guest 120 (10/10), Guest 174 (10/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. The supporting structure of your body, AND a dangerous Olympic winter sport.

What is it called?
Hint


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Question 2 of 10
2. The top of your head (or your whole head), AND an emblem of a monarchy.

Which item?
Hint


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Question 3 of 10
3. The apertures in your irises that allow light to reach the retinas, AND young students in school.

What are they?
Hint


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Question 4 of 10
4. Your thorax, AND a receptacle for storing your valuables.

What is it?
Hint


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Question 5 of 10
5. Parts of your body tissues that have specific functions, AND keyboard instruments with pipes.

What are they called?
Hint


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Question 6 of 10
6. The undersides of your hands, AND coconut-bearing trees.

What are they named?
Hint


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Question 7 of 10
7. Horn-like keratinous plates on your fingertips, AND pin-shaped fasteners used in construction.

What are they?
Hint


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Question 8 of 10
8. The backs of your lower legs, AND bovine young.

What do you call them?
Hint


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Question 9 of 10
9. The weight-bearing terminal portion of your leg, AND a measure equalling twelve inches.

What is it?
Hint


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Question 10 of 10
10. The plantar aspect, AND a bottom-dwelling flatfish.

What is it called?
Hint


photo quiz

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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The supporting structure of your body, AND a dangerous Olympic winter sport. What is it called?

Answer: Skeleton

As opposed to the skeleton sled that you slide down the run face first lying on your stomach, your anatomical skeleton is there to provide structure to your tissues and allow for a means of moving (combined with your muscles). Some of them also have the dual purpose of protecting your inner organs.

In total there are 206 bones in the human body, with the largest being your femurs (upper leg bones), and the smallest being the stapes, which can be found in your ear.

Bones are connected to muscles by ligaments, allowing muscles to move those bones when your brain commands it. Cartilage assists in providing some structure, but is largely used at juncture points between bones to facilitate movement (at ends of long bones and in-between vertebrae, for example).
2. The top of your head (or your whole head), AND an emblem of a monarchy. Which item?

Answer: Crown

The golden crown in the picture and your anatomical crown are related, in that one is typically placed atop the other. Depending on the reference, the use of the word 'crown' can mean the whole head, or just the top part of the head. Other terms for the top part of the head include 'skullcap' and 'roof of the cranial cavity'.

If you have ever heard of Jack and Jill and weren't quite sure about their misadventure fetching water, when Jack fell down, it was the top of his head that he broke.
3. The apertures in your irises that allow light to reach the retinas, AND young students in school. What are they?

Answer: Pupils

Students who are not the age of majority are called pupils, from the Latin 'pupillus', which means 'minor or ward'. This is quite different from the type of pupils that are part of your organ of sight (AKA the eye). As described in the question, your pupils are what can expand or contract to allow varying levels of light through the lenses and to the retinas on the back wall of your eyeballs, which your brain then deciphers into something that makes sense - what you see.
4. Your thorax, AND a receptacle for storing your valuables. What is it?

Answer: Chest

In the same way that the piece of furniture known as a chest holds and protects things, so does your anatomical chest. Comprised of the area between your neck and your abdomen, your chest (or thorax) includes the thoracic wall (largely your rib cage) and cavity, which encases the heart, lungs, thymus gland, and various other muscles and tissues.
5. Parts of your body tissues that have specific functions, AND keyboard instruments with pipes. What are they called?

Answer: Organs

Both the musical instrument and your bodily organs derive from the same root words in Latin (organum) and Greek (organon), which refer to 'implement, tool for making or doing; musical instrument; organ of sense, organ of the body'.

There are many (79, to be exact) organs within the human body, but five are considered vital for survival: the heart, brain, kidneys, liver, and lungs. Your largest organ is your epidermis (your skin), while your smallest organ is the pineal gland, which is found in the brain and regulates some hormones, including melatonin, which helps us sleep.
6. The undersides of your hands, AND coconut-bearing trees. What are they named?

Answer: Palms

There are more types of palms than just coconut-bearing ones, but either way, they are related to the palms of your hands, since they are named after the way your fingers spread. The Latin term 'palma' means 'palm of the hand'.

Your palms are found between your wrists and your fingers (and thumbs). They are made up of the five metacarpals connecting each wrists to the fingers (and thumb). A number of muscles help to manipulate all the different movements of which your hand is capable of making.
7. Horn-like keratinous plates on your fingertips, AND pin-shaped fasteners used in construction. What are they?

Answer: Nails

While it might seem that the only similar characteristic between the two types of nails here is that they are hard, linguistically there is no real connection between the two. According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the term has been used interchangeably pretty much from the beginning, although they do think that the 'fingernail' sense of 'nail' may have been a little earlier.

Your anatomical nail is made of the same stuff that horns and hooves are made of. And they serve the purpose of protecting the tender tissue beneath them, called the matrix, that contains nerves, blood vessels, and lymph.
8. The backs of your lower legs, AND bovine young. What do you call them?

Answer: Calves

Baby cows. No one seems to know why we use the same term for the back part of our lower legs. It's all conjecture, but the term seems to have originated from Old Norse.

That said, your calves are made up of the triceps surae muscle (which is comprised of the gastrocnemius and soleus) and the tibialis posterior muscle. Essentially, they work to pull up your heel when walking, running or jumping.
9. The weight-bearing terminal portion of your leg, AND a measure equalling twelve inches. What is it?

Answer: Foot

The measurement of a foot in length was originally based on the length of someone's (likely in ancient Egypt) foot. Inches were originally based on the width of a thumb. Eventually, the measurement was standardized to its use today.

Anatomically, your feet are divided into three main sections: the forefoot contains the toes (phalanges) and metatarsals; the midfoot contains the pyramidal bones that form the arch; and the hindfoot has the heel and ankle bones. And of course, all the muscles, tendons and ligaments that hold it all together.
10. The plantar aspect, AND a bottom-dwelling flatfish. What is it called?

Answer: Sole

Just as the sole (fish) is flat, the origin of the word for both the fish and the bottom of your feet relates to flatness. The latin term 'soleum' was the word for sandal. Thus, the connection to the bottom of your foot (even though your foot should not exactly be flat).

As the soles of your feet carry the weight of your body, it should be of no surprise to learn that the skin there is the thickest of any on the body. And, as with the palms, no hair grows there.
Source: Author reedy

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor rossian before going online.
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