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Quiz about Champions League Winning Managers  The 1960s
Quiz about Champions League Winning Managers  The 1960s

Champions League Winning Managers - The 1960s Quiz


The quiz series looking back at managers of European Cup / Champions League winning teams has now reached the 1960s. Due to lack of tournaments played before 1960 this is as far back as we will be travelling. How many can you match?

A matching quiz by MickeyDGod. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
MickeyDGod
Time
4 mins
Type
Match Quiz
Quiz #
392,308
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
223
(a) Drag-and-drop from the right to the left, or (b) click on a right side answer box and then on a left side box to move it.
QuestionsChoices
1. 1960: Real Madrid  
  Helenio Herrera
2. 1961: Benfica  
  Bela Guttman
3. 1962: Benfica  
  Miguel Munoz
4. 1963: AC Milan  
  Miguel Munoz
5. 1964: Inter Milan  
  Nereo Rocco
6. 1965: Inter Milan  
  Bela Guttmann
7. 1966: Real Madrid  
  Helenio Herrera
8. 1967: Celtic  
  Matt Busby
9. 1968: Manchester United  
  Jock Stein
10. 1969: AC Milan  
  Nereo Rocco





Select each answer

1. 1960: Real Madrid
2. 1961: Benfica
3. 1962: Benfica
4. 1963: AC Milan
5. 1964: Inter Milan
6. 1965: Inter Milan
7. 1966: Real Madrid
8. 1967: Celtic
9. 1968: Manchester United
10. 1969: AC Milan

Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. 1960: Real Madrid

Answer: Miguel Munoz

Real Madrid had already won the trophy the first four times it had been contested since 1956 and added a fifth consecutive win with a thrilling 7-3 win against Eintracht Frankfurt at Hampden Park in Glasgow. Alfredo Di Stafano's hat-trick for Madrid would have been impressive in any other year but was eclipsed by the four goals scored by Ferenc Puskas.

Miguel Munoz became the first person to win the European Cup as player and manager, having been part of the Madrid squad in 1956, 1957 and 1958. In 1959 he was learning his trade as a manager with Madrid's reserve team, Plus Ultra. He led Madrid to European Cup glory again in 1966. It would take 32 years for them to win the trophy again.

Jose Villalonga Llorente spent two years at Madrid from 1955-1957, winning the European Cup in both seasons - the first two seasons of the competition. He was only 36 when they won the inaugural tournament. He later joined Atletico Madrid and led them to victory in the Cup Winners Cup in 1962. After this he became manager of the Spanish national team and won the UEFA European Championship in 1964. He died of a heart attack in 1973 at the age of 53.

The 1958 and 1959 winning Madrid teams were managed by Argentina's Luis Carniglia. Despite going on to manage such teams as Fiorentina, AC Milan, Juventus, Bordeaux and Deportivo La Coruna, he won only five trophies as a manager - the two European Cup victories, the Spanish eague championship in 1958, the French league championship in 1956 with Nice and the Inter-Cities Fair Cup, a precursor to the UEFA Cup, in 1961 with Roma.
2. 1961: Benfica

Answer: Bela Guttmann

After dominating the first five years of the competition, Real Madrid were eliminated from the 1960-61 tournament at the hands of their fierce rivals Barcelona. Despite going on to reach the final, the Catalans could not emulate Madrid and lost 3-2 to Benfica.

Bela Guttman was a Hungarian Jew who, as a player between the wars, spent much of his career playing in the USA. He returned to Europe in 1932 and began managing teams in Austria. During the Second World War he hid from the Nazis in an attic in Ujpest but was captured and sent to a forced labour camp. He escaped in 1944 just as he was to be sent to Auschwitz. Sadly, his father and sister were not so lucky and were executed at Auschwitz. Guttman returned to management after the war. After a series of roles at other clubs he found his way to Benfica in 1959.
3. 1962: Benfica

Answer: Bela Guttman

The second win for Benfica was a 5-3 win against Real Madrid. Madrid had gone 2-0 ahead, both goals being scored as part of a Ferenc Puskas hat-trick, but could not hold off a talented attacking side which contained an 19 year old Eusebio, who had joined Benfica following their European Cup victory the year before.

Following this victory, Guttman approached the Benfica board and asked or a pay rise. When he was turned down, he left the club and allegedly placed a curse on them that they would not be European champions again in a hundred years. Benfica subsequenty lost European Cup finals in 1963, 1965, 1968, 1988 and 1990, as well as UEFA Cup/Europa League finals in 1983, 2013 and 2014. Guttman died in 1981 at the age of 82 and is buried in Vienna. Prior to the European Cup final in 1990, Eusebio prayed at his grave and asked for the curse to be lifted. It wasn't. They lost the final 1-0 to AC Milan.
4. 1963: AC Milan

Answer: Nereo Rocco

Having lost the final in 1958, Milan became only the third team to lift the trophy, and the first from Italy, when they beat Benfica 2-1, Jose Altafino's two goals cancelling out Eusebio's opener for Benfica. Rocco led Milan to European Cup glory again in 1969, as well as the Cup Winners' Cup in 1968 and 1973.
5. 1964: Inter Milan

Answer: Helenio Herrera

Inter Milan equalled the exploits of their city rivals AC Milan the previous year, defeating Real Madrid 3-1 in the final. This was also to be the last game Alfredo Di Stefano would play for Real Madrid before ending his playing career with Espanyol.

In the Inter team that day was Spaniard Luis Suarez, whose two away goals against Madrid in 1961 had helped Barcelona prevent their rivals from winning their sixth consecutive European Cup win. Suarez became the most expensive player in the world at the time of his transfer in 1961, becoming the first player to break 100,000 barrier, and would go on to play an integral part in a fairly successful Inter team throughout the 1960s.

Like Luis Suarez, Helenio Herrera had also joined Inter from Barcelona, making the switch in 1960. Despite winning the Spanish league championship in each of his two seasons at Barcelona they had failed to achieve the same success in the European Cup. He would go on to win the trophy twice with Inter, however, along with three Italian league championship victories.
6. 1965: Inter Milan

Answer: Helenio Herrera

The tenth final in the history of the tournament provided the second consecutive win for Inter Milan, and was also only the second final in the history of the tournament not to feature a team from Spain. The first of those finals had been in 1963 when AC Milan defeated Benfica. This time it was the turn of city rivals Inter Milan to beat the Portuguese side. The 1-0 scoreline meant that this was the first final in the history of the tournament to be decided by a solitary goal.

This was also the second consecutive victory for Helenio Herrera, who would lead the club to victory in the Intercontinental cup in both 1964 and 1965 too. Despite spells with the Italian national team, Roma, Inter Milan again, Rimini and Barcelona, Inter's Italian league championship in 1966 was the last trophy he would claim as a manager, although he did lead Inter to the European Cup final in 1967 where they were beaten by Celtic. He retired from management following his second spell with Barcelona in 1981 and died in 1997 at the age of 87.
7. 1966: Real Madrid

Answer: Miguel Munoz

Six years after their last European Cup triumph, it was back to winning ways for Real Madrid as they defeated Partizan Belgrade 2-1. This was the first final Madrid had taken part in not to feature Alfredo Di Stefano, who had left the club following their previous appearance in 1964. Neither did I feature Ferenc Puskas, who retired at the end of the 1965-66 season, although Puskas did score against Feyenoord en-route to the final. One player who did feature in all of Madrid's eight final appearances between 1956-1966 was Franciso Gento, still only 32 at the time of this match. His eight appearances in European Cup finals is one which is unlikely to be equalled. Despite their early success in the tournament it would be 32 years before Madrid would win the cup again (1998 1-0 vs. Juventus), with their only other final appearance in that time coming in 1981 when they lost 1-0 to Liverpool.

Between 1961-1969 Munoz led Madrid to eight out of nine Spanish league championships. The only year they lost out was in 1966 when they lost out to city rivals Atletico Madrid by a single point. He left Madrid in 1974 after a 26 year association with the club. His greatest achievement since then was to take Spain to the final of the 1984 UEFA European Championship where they were beaten by France. He died in 1990 at the age of 68.
8. 1967: Celtic

Answer: Jock Stein

After winning the European Cup in 1964 and 1965, Inter Milan went into the 1967 final as strong favourites. Inter were a tactically defensive team while Celtic played a more attacking style. Added to this was the fact that Inter were missing their star player, Luis Suarez, through injury. Despite taking an early lead, Celtic went on to win the match 2-1 to become the first team from the British Isles to win the European Cup.

The Celtic team that day are referred to as the Lisbon Lions in reference to the match being played in Lisbon. Famously, all but one of their players were born within 10 miles of Celtic Park in Glasgow, the one exception being Bobby Lennox who was born in Saltcoats - 30 miles away. As well as becoming the first British team to win the European Cup, they also became the first team in Europe to win a Quadruple, having already won the Scottish league title, the Scottish FA Cup and the Scottish League Cup (as well as the Glasgow Cup).

Jock Stein led Celtic to nine Scottish league championships in a row between 1966-1974, as well as 8 Scottish Cup wins and 6 League Cup victories. He guided Celtic to the European Cup final in 1970 but could not emulate the success of 1967 and Celtic lost to Feyenoord.

Stein would later go on to manage Scotland, and in 1985 he died of a heart attack in the Scotland medical room following a 1-1 draw against Wales in a World Cup qualifying match. Stein's assistant that day was Alex Ferguson, who would go on to lift European Cup in 1999 and 2008 with Manchester United.
9. 1968: Manchester United

Answer: Matt Busby

Manchester United became the second team from the British Isles and the first from England to lift the European Cup when they defeated Benfica 4-1 after extra time. This was Benfica's fifth final in eight years.

The match came 10 years after the Munich air disaster which had killed several players in the Manchester United team which had just knocked out Red Star Belgrade to reach the semi final of the European Cup. It was believed that they had a good chance of winning the tournament, but they would lose to eventual runners-up AC Milan in the semi final.

Matt Busby, who had spent his playing career at United's two biggest rivals, Manchester City and Liverpool, had been in charge at Manchester United since 1945 and was read the last rites twice following the Munich air disaster, but recovered to rebuild the team, culminating in the European victory in 1968 which earned I'm a knighthood.

He retired in 1969 but came returned briefly in 1970-71 when his successor, Wilf McGuinness was sacked. He later took up a role as a club director before being made club president n 1980. He died in 1994 at the age of 84, and along with Jock Stein who had won the European Cup with Celtic in 1967, is regarded as one of the greatest managers of his generation.
10. 1969: AC Milan

Answer: Nereo Rocco

A thrilling 4-1 win over Ajax saw Milan claim their second European Cup. Perhaps even more impressive is that en-route to the final they defeated the previous two champions, Celtic (1967) and Manchester United (1968).

Rocco had three spells at Madrid between 1961 and 1977, managing, respectively, Torina and Fiorentina in between. He won only six major trophies as manager, all of them with Milan, and at least one during each spell with the club. He died in 1979 at the age of 66.
Source: Author MickeyDGod

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor gtho4 before going online.
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Related Quizzes
This quiz is part of series Soccer Managers:

UEFA Champions League Winning Managers

  1. Champions League Winning Managers - The 1960s Average
  2. Champions League Winning Managers - The 1970s Easier
  3. Champions League Winning Managers - The 1980s Easier
  4. Champions League Winning Managers - The 1990s Easier
  5. Champions League Winning Managers - The 2000s Easier

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