FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about Just Forget It
Quiz about Just Forget It

Just Forget It Trivia Quiz


An all multiple choice quiz about things that some players would rather you forget. Have fun! :-)

A multiple-choice quiz by Nightmare. Estimated time: 6 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. Sports Trivia
  6. »
  7. MLB Challenge
  8. »
  9. MLB Difficult

Author
Nightmare
Time
6 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
226,018
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Difficult
Avg Score
4 / 10
Plays
353
Question 1 of 10
1. Which of the following pitchers began their Major League career by giving up a home run to their first-ever batter? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Before Rickey Henderson came along and broke my record, people remembered me for getting caught stealing 36 times in one season. It took almost 60 years to remove my name from the top of that list. Who am I? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. I won 20+ games many times in my career. I was a season MVP runner-up and a World Series MVP. Why do people remember that I set a record for throwing 16 balks in a season? Who am I that deserves better? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. A career highlight for me was that I won 20 games in a season, but that was all erased because my team lost 102 games. Who am I? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. I knew that I was good enough to play professional baseball because I eventually made it to the Hall of Fame, but it seemed that nobody wanted me. In my baseball career, I played in four different leagues. Who am I? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. What an absolute bust I was. The Mets selected me number two overall in the first Major League amateur draft in the 1960s. Who am I? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. I was an average pitcher until the Mets picked me in the expansion draft of 1961. My career was over from that point. In two seasons with the Mets I went 15-46, losing more than 20 games both times. I was labeled for life after that. Who am I? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. I was a great pitcher, but amongst all my accomplishments, I walked over 200 batters in a season somewhere in there which set an American League record. Of course, people remember me for that too even though I won 20+ games many times in my career. Who am I? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. My first Major League plate appearance in the 1950s was a pinch-hit home run! What a cloud that I was on, but when the air cleared, that was pretty much it for my career. Who am I? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. I played the infield and outfield throughout my career, but someone thought that I could pitch too. In my first season as a pitcher, I set a National League record for the most losses in a season. What a terrible idea that was, but yet I still appeared as a pitcher in the rest of my six of eight seasons. Who am I? Hint



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Which of the following pitchers began their Major League career by giving up a home run to their first-ever batter?

Answer: Bert Blyleven

Blyleven gave it up on June 5, 1970, while pitching for the Minnesota Twins. He continued to give up another 16 in the season, and was an indicator of things to come. In 1986, Bert became the first pitcher in history to give up 50 home runs in a season.

He tried to top that in 1987, but fell short with 46. Over 22 seasons, Blyleven gave up 430 which landed him in the number seven spot when he retired in 1992.
2. Before Rickey Henderson came along and broke my record, people remembered me for getting caught stealing 36 times in one season. It took almost 60 years to remove my name from the top of that list. Who am I?

Answer: Miller Huggins

Huggins stole 32 bases in 1914 with the St. Louis Cardinals, but was caught 36 times setting a record. Miller later helmed the Yankees to six World Series with Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig. Henderson was caught 42 times in 1982, while setting his record of stealing 130 in the season.
3. I won 20+ games many times in my career. I was a season MVP runner-up and a World Series MVP. Why do people remember that I set a record for throwing 16 balks in a season? Who am I that deserves better?

Answer: Dave Stewart

After throwing only eight total balks in his first eight seasons, Stewart threw 16 in 1988 with the Athletics. Dave was the MVP runner-up to Bret Saberhagen of the Royals in 1989. Stewart won 20+ games in a season four times. He finished out his career of 16 seasons in 1995 with 23 balks.
4. A career highlight for me was that I won 20 games in a season, but that was all erased because my team lost 102 games. Who am I?

Answer: Ned Garver

Garver threw a great season of 20-12 with the St. Louis Browns in 1951. Unfortunately, the team finished last with a 52-102 record. Even the pinch-hitting fiasco of Eddie Gaedel didn't help the Browns in the season. That was Garver's career high.
5. I knew that I was good enough to play professional baseball because I eventually made it to the Hall of Fame, but it seemed that nobody wanted me. In my baseball career, I played in four different leagues. Who am I?

Answer: Hugh Duffy

Duffy began his career as an outfielder with the Chicago White Stockings of the National League in 1888. In 1890, Hugh played with the Chicago Pirates of the Players League. 1891 saw him in a Boston Reds unform of the American Association. 1892 found him as a Boston Beaneater of the National League, where he won a Triple Crown in 1894.

He joined the 1901 Milwaukee Brewers of the new American League, then finished out his career with the Phillies of the NL from 1902-1904. After all this, the hall finally found him in 1945.
6. What an absolute bust I was. The Mets selected me number two overall in the first Major League amateur draft in the 1960s. Who am I?

Answer: Les Rohr

The first draft ever in 1965 saw the Kansas City Athletics select Rick Monday. The Mets wasted the second pick on Rohr, when other players available were in such names as Ray Fosse, Billy Conigliaro, and Bernie Carbo. Rohr played in three seasons for the Mets before retiring. He appeared in six games and had a career record of just 2-3.
7. I was an average pitcher until the Mets picked me in the expansion draft of 1961. My career was over from that point. In two seasons with the Mets I went 15-46, losing more than 20 games both times. I was labeled for life after that. Who am I?

Answer: Roger Craig

Roger played for seven seasons with the Dodgers before the lightning bolt hit. In 1962, Craig went 10-24, then was worse in 1963 by going 5-22 with the Mets again. He finished out his career in 1966 as a Phillie.
8. I was a great pitcher, but amongst all my accomplishments, I walked over 200 batters in a season somewhere in there which set an American League record. Of course, people remember me for that too even though I won 20+ games many times in my career. Who am I?

Answer: Bob Feller

Feller, a Cleveland Indian, won 20+ games six times in his 18-season career. In 1938, he set an American League record for passing 208 hitters in the season, a record that stood throughout the rest of the century. Bob won the Triple Crown in 1940, retired in 1956, then the hall opened its doors to him in 1962.
9. My first Major League plate appearance in the 1950s was a pinch-hit home run! What a cloud that I was on, but when the air cleared, that was pretty much it for my career. Who am I?

Answer: Ted Tappe

September 14, 1950, was Ted's Major League debut. His pinch-hit home run was the first of only five in his entire career of three seasons. After appearing in only 11 games with the Reds in his first two seasons, Tappe was a part of a multi-player trade with the Cubs. Ted died in 2004 with that only baseball highlight.
10. I played the infield and outfield throughout my career, but someone thought that I could pitch too. In my first season as a pitcher, I set a National League record for the most losses in a season. What a terrible idea that was, but yet I still appeared as a pitcher in the rest of my six of eight seasons. Who am I?

Answer: John Coleman

Coleman set his record with the 1883 Philadelphia Quakers of the National League. He went 12-48 in the season. The Quakers finished in last place with a 17-81 record. John retired with a 23-72 record in 1890.
Source: Author Nightmare

This quiz was reviewed by our editing team before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
Related Quizzes
1. Baseball: The Ultimate Challenge Difficult
2. Baseball Challenges Difficult
3. 100 MPH Baseball Difficult
4. How About That! Difficult
5. You Be the Editor! Difficult
6. Impossible Baseball - 71 Difficult
7. This Can't Be Right Difficult
8. Eye-Popping Baseball Difficult
9. Oxygen Tank Baseball Difficult
10. The Diamond Challenge Difficult
11. Teary-Eyed Baseball Difficult
12. Old-Timers Baseball: Pt. 3 Difficult

4/14/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us