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Quiz about Dutch Prime Ministers  1945 to 2010
Quiz about Dutch Prime Ministers  1945 to 2010

Dutch Prime Ministers - 1945 to 2010 Quiz


Can you arrange the Dutch Prime Ministers who have served between 1945 and 2010 in the correct order?

A matching quiz by piet. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
piet
Time
3 mins
Type
Match Quiz
Quiz #
413,231
Updated
Sep 22 23
# Qns
15
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
12 / 15
Plays
68
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
(a) Drag-and-drop from the right to the left, or (b) click on a right side answer box and then on a left side box to move it.
QuestionsChoices
1. 1945-1946   
  Louis Beel
2. 1946-1948  
  Barend Biesheuvel
3. 1948-1958  
  Ruud Lubbers
4. 1958-1959  
  Jan de Quay
5. 1959-1963  
  Jelle Zijlstra
6. 1963-1965  
  Piet de Jong
7. 1965-1966  
  Victor Marijnen
8. 1966-1967  
  Wim Kok
9. 1967-1971  
  Wim Schermerhorn
10. 1971-1973  
  Dries van Agt
11. 1973-1977  
  Joop den Uyl
12. 1977-1982  
  Jo Cals
13. 1982-1994  
  Willem Drees
14. 1994-2002  
  Louis Beel
15. 2002-2010  
  Jan Peter Balkenende





Select each answer

1. 1945-1946
2. 1946-1948
3. 1948-1958
4. 1958-1959
5. 1959-1963
6. 1963-1965
7. 1965-1966
8. 1966-1967
9. 1967-1971
10. 1971-1973
11. 1973-1977
12. 1977-1982
13. 1982-1994
14. 1994-2002
15. 2002-2010

Most Recent Scores
Apr 10 2024 : Rumpo: 1/15
Mar 17 2024 : Buddy1: 15/15

Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. 1945-1946

Answer: Wim Schermerhorn

Wim Schermerhorn was a Dutch politician who served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands from 1945 to 1946. He was a member of the Free-thinking Democratic League and later co-founded the Labour Party. He was also a member of the senate of the Netherlands from 1951 to 1963.

Schermerhorn was born in Akersloot, Netherlands, in 1894. He studied geodesy at the Delft University of Technology and worked as a geodesist before entering politics. He was imprisoned by the Nazis during World War II but escaped and went into hiding. After the war, he became Prime Minister of the Netherlands in 1945. He resigned in 1946 but remained active in politics until his death in 1977.

The cabinet was a coalition of the Labour Party (PvdA) and the Catholic People's Party (KVP). They started the rebuilding of the Netherlands after the war. The country was facing a number of post-war economic problems, including high unemployment and inflation. These and other problems made it difficult for the cabinet to implement its policies. In the end, the cabinet was unable to overcome these challenges and it resigned in July 1946. The resignation of the Schermerhorn cabinet led to a period of political instability in the Netherlands. The next cabinet was not formed until December 1946.
2. 1946-1948

Answer: Louis Beel

Louis Beel was a Dutch politician who served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands from 1946-48. He was a member of the Roman Catholic State Party and later co-founded the Catholic People's Party (now the Christian Democratic Appeal). He was also a member of the Council of State of the Netherlands from 1959 to 1972.

Beel was born in Roermond, Netherlands, in 1902. He studied law at the University of Amsterdam and worked as a lawyer before entering politics. He was appointed Minister of the Interior in 1945 and became Prime Minister in 1946. He resigned as Prime Minister in 1948 but remained active in politics. He served as Prime Minister again from 1958 to 1959.

Beel's political career was marked by his commitment to democracy and social justice. He was a strong advocate for the rights of workers and the poor. He also played a key role in the rebuilding of the Netherlands after World War II.
The cabinet was unable to reach an agreement with the Indonesian nationalists on the future of the Dutch East Indies. This led to a number of protests and demonstrations, which further weakened the cabinet's position.
3. 1948-1958

Answer: Willem Drees

Willem Drees (1886-1988) served as the Prime Minister of The Netherlands from 1948 to 1958, playing a crucial role in post-war reconstruction. A key figure in the Labour Party, his government introduced important welfare state reforms, earning him the nickname "Father Drees." These policies solidified his legacy as an architect of modern Dutch social security.

On a personal level, Drees was known for his integrity, frugality, and dedication to public service. Married to Catharina Hent, the couple had four children. Even after his tenure, he remained influential, serving as a statesman until his passing at 101 years of age.
4. 1958-1959

Answer: Louis Beel

The cabinet was a coalition of the Catholic People's Party (KVP), the Labour Party (PvdA), and the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD). These three parties had different views on a number of issues, including the role of the monarchy and the future of the European Economic Community (EEC).

The cabinet's popularity declined in the months leading up to its collapse. This was due to a number of factors, including the cabinet's handling in the Greet Hofmans affair, a healer who was invited to heal the Queens youngest daughter Marijke.

In the end, the cabinet was unable to overcome these challenges and it resigned in May 1959. The resignation of the Beel cabinet led to a period of political instability in the Netherlands.
5. 1959-1963

Answer: Jan de Quay

Jan de Quay was a Dutch politician who served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands from 1959 to 1963. He was a member of the Catholic People's Party (now the Christian Democratic Appeal) and a psychologist by training. He was also a member of the Senate of the Netherlands from 1963 to 1966.

De Quay was born in 's-Hertogenbosch, Netherlands, in 1901. He studied psychology at the University of Utrecht and worked as a psychologist before entering politics. He was elected to the Senate in 1946 and became Prime Minister in 1959. He resigned as Prime Minister in 1963 but remained active in politics until his death in 1985.

De Quay's political career was marked by his commitment to social justice and economic development. He made a start to reorganized the laws for Education (Mammoetwet). He also introduced unemployment benefit and child benefit. While he served as Prime Minister natural gas was discovered in Slochteren. In New York he signed the agreement about the conversion of Dutch New-Guinea to The Republic of Indonesia.
6. 1963-1965

Answer: Victor Marijnen

Victor Marijnen was a Dutch politician who served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands from 1963 to 1965. He was a member of the Catholic People's Party (now the Christian Democratic Appeal) and a jurist by training. He was also the Mayor of The Hague from 1968 to 1975.

Marijnen was born in Arnhem, Netherlands, in 1917. He studied law at the University of Nijmegen and worked as a lawyer before entering politics. He was elected to the House of Representatives in 1959 and became Prime Minister in 1963. He resigned as Prime Minister in 1965 but remained active in politics until his death in 1975.

Disagreement about the role of commercial TV transmitting from the North Sea led to the end of the cabinet in 1965.
7. 1965-1966

Answer: Jo Cals

Jo Cals was a Dutch politician who served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands from 1965 to 1966. He was a member of the Catholic People's Party (now the Christian Democratic Appeal) and a jurist by training. He was also the Minister of Education, Arts and Sciences from 1952 to 1963.

Cals was born in Roermond, Netherlands, in 1914. He studied law at the University of Amsterdam and worked as a lawyer before entering politics. He was elected to the House of Representatives in 1956 and became Prime Minister in 1965. He resigned as Prime Minister in 1966 but remained active in politics until his death in 1971.

The cabinet's popularity declined in the months leading up to its collapse. This was due to a number of factors, including the cabinet's handling of the 1966 university protests. The 1966 university protests, were a series of protests against the government's education policies. The cabinet was accused of being heavy-handed in its response to the protests and of not understanding the concerns of the students.
8. 1966-1967

Answer: Jelle Zijlstra

Jelle Zijlstra was a Dutch politician who served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands from 1966 to 1967. He was a member of the Anti-Revolutionary Party (ARP) and an economist by training. He was also the President of De Nederlandsche Bank (DNB) from 1956 to 1966.

Zijlstra was born in Oosterbierum, Netherlands, in 1918. He studied economics at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and worked as an economist before entering politics. He was elected to the House of Representatives in 1952 and became Prime Minister in 1966. He resigned as Prime Minister in 1967 but remained active in politics until his death in 2001.

The cabinet's popularity declined in the months leading up to its collapse. This was due to a number of factors, including the cabinet's handling of the 1967 economic crisis The 1967 economic crisis was a major challenge to the government, and the cabinet was accused of being out of touch with the concerns of the business community. The cabinet was criticized for its handling of the crisis and for its austerity measures. The austerity measures were particularly unpopular with the trade unions, who saw them as a threat to their members' jobs.
9. 1967-1971

Answer: Piet de Jong

Piet de Jong was a Dutch politician who served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands from 1967 to 1971. He was a member of the Catholic People's Party (now the Christian Democratic Appeal) and a naval officer by training. He was also the Minister of Defense from 1963 to 1967.

De Jong was born in Katwijk aan Zee, Netherlands, in 1915. He studied naval engineering at the Royal Netherlands Naval College and worked as a naval officer before entering politics. He was elected to the House of Representatives in 1956 and became Prime Minister in 1967. He resigned as Prime Minister in 1971 but remained active in politics until his death in 2016.

One of the key accomplishments of the De Jong cabinet was the successful negotiation of the Dutch withdrawal from the former Dutch colony of Suriname, which gained independence in 1975. The negotiations resulted in the establishment of the Netherlands New Guinea Foundation, which aimed to promote the welfare and development of the region.

The issue of cultural and social change also emerged as a prominent topic during the De Jong cabinet. The 1960s were a time of social transformation in the Netherlands, marked by protests, demonstrations, and calls for societal change. The cabinet sought to address these issues by implementing various social reforms, such as the decriminalization of homosexuality and the introduction of the Open University, which provided accessible higher education for adults.
10. 1971-1973

Answer: Barend Biesheuvel

Barend Biesheuvel was a Dutch politician who served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands from 1971 to 1973. He was a member of the Anti-Revolutionary Party (ARP) and a jurist by training. He was also the Speaker of the House of Representatives from 1966 to 1971.

Biesheuvel was born in Haarlemmerliede, Netherlands, in 1920. He studied law at the University of Amsterdam and worked as a lawyer before entering politics. He was elected to the House of Representatives in 1963 and became Prime Minister in 1971. He resigned as Prime Minister in 1973 but remained active in politics until his death in 2001.

One of the central concerns during the Biesheuvel cabinet was the economic situation. The early 1970s were marked by global economic instability, including rising oil prices and inflation. The cabinet implemented measures to combat inflation and stabilize the economy, including wage restraint policies and efforts to reduce government spending.
Another significant issue that the cabine
t had to address was the social unrest and protests occurring in the Netherlands.

Despite the challenges and internal disagreements, the Biesheuvel cabinet achieved some notable accomplishments. It established the National Institute for Public Health and Environmental Protection (RIVM), which aimed to address public health issues and environmental concerns. The cabinet also introduced reforms in education, including the establishment of a new system for funding universities and the expansion of vocational education.

Ultimately, the Barend Biesheuvel cabinet faced significant economic challenges and social unrest during its tenure. Despite the political crisis and internal disagreements, the government implemented several policies and reforms to address these issues, leaving a lasting impact on the Netherlands during a time of societal change and economic instability.
11. 1973-1977

Answer: Joop den Uyl

Joop den Uyl was a Dutch politician who served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands from 1973 to 1977. He was a member of the Labour Party (PvdA) and an economist by training. He was also the Minister of Social Affairs and Employment from 1971 to 1973.

Den Uyl was born in Amsterdam, Netherlands, in 1919. He studied economics at the University of Amsterdam and worked as an economist before entering politics. He was elected to the House of Representatives in 1956 and became Prime Minister in 1973. He resigned as Prime Minister in 1977 but remained active in politics until his death in 1987.

Den Uyl's political career was marked by his commitment to social justice and economic equality. He was a strong advocate for the rights of workers and the poor. He also played a key role in the modernization of the Dutch welfare state.

The 1973 oil crisis: The cabinet was unable to deal effectively with the 1973 oil crisis, which led to a recession and rising unemployment. The cabinet was criticized for its handling of the crisis and for its austerity measures.
In the end, the cabinet was unable to overcome these challenges and it resigned in September 1977. The resignation of the Den Uyl cabinet led to a period of political instability in the Netherlands. The next cabinet, led by Van Agt, was not formed until December 1977.
12. 1977-1982

Answer: Dries van Agt

Dries van Agt was a Dutch politician who served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands from 1977 to 1982. He was a member of the Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA) and a jurist by training. He was also the Minister of Justice and Deputy Prime Minister from 1973 to 1977.

Van Agt was born in Geldrop, Netherlands, in 1931. He studied law at the Catholic University of Nijmegen and worked as a lawyer before entering politics. He was elected to the House of Representatives in 1967 and became Prime Minister in 1977. He resigned as Prime Minister in 1982 but remained active in politics until his retirement in 2000.

First Van Agt Cabinet (1977-1981): The First Van Agt cabinet was formed in December 1977 and marked the first time the newly established CDA came into power. Dries van Agt, a member of the CDA, became the Prime Minister.
One of the significant issues the cabinet had to contend with was the economic crisis and high unemployment rates. The government implemented policies aimed at stimulating economic growth and reducing unemployment. These measures included investing in infrastructure projects, promoting industrial innovation, and introducing social welfare reforms.

Another major challenge during this period was the debate surrounding nuclear energy and arms control. The cabinet faced public protests and political divisions over the construction of nuclear power plants and the deployment of nuclear weapons on Dutch soil. These issues generated significant public discourse and contributed to political tensions within the coalition.

Furthermore, the First Van Agt cabinet had to grapple with conflicts in the Dutch colonial territories of Suriname and the Netherlands Antilles. Suriname gained independence in 1975, but political and economic instability persisted, leading to a surge in Surinamese immigrants to the Netherlands. The cabinet implemented policies to address the integration and welfare of these immigrants.

Second Van Agt Cabinet (1981-1982): Following the collapse of the First Van Agt cabinet, new elections were held in 1981. The CDA, VVD, and DS'70 formed a coalition once again, resulting in the Second Van Agt cabinet. However, this cabinet's tenure was short-lived, as it faced numerous challenges and political disagreements.

Another significant challenge that the Second Van Agt cabinet faced was the ongoing debate surrounding the presence of U.S. cruise missiles in the Netherlands. The government's decision to allow the deployment of these missiles on Dutch soil sparked widespread protests and divisions within the coalition. Ultimately, these disagreements led to the collapse of the cabinet in 1982.
13. 1982-1994

Answer: Ruud Lubbers

Ruud Lubbers was a Dutch politician who served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands from 1982 to 1994. He was a member of the Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA) and an economist by training. He was also the Minister of Housing and Spatial Planning from 1978 to 1982.

Lubbers was born in Rotterdam, Netherlands, in 1939. He studied economics at the Erasmus University Rotterdam and worked as an economist before entering politics. He was elected to the House of Representatives in 1971 and became Prime Minister in 1982. He resigned as Prime Minister in 1994 but remained active in politics until his retirement in 2005.

First Lubbers Cabinet (1982-1986): The First Lubbers Cabinet was formed in November 1982. It consisted of a coalition between the Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA) and the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD). This cabinet faced major challenges, including an economic recession, high unemployment rates, and a need for structural reforms.

One of the primary focuses of the First Lubbers Cabinet was economic recovery and fiscal consolidation. The government implemented strict austerity measures and pursued market-oriented economic policies, aiming to reduce government deficits and stimulate economic growth. These measures, known as the "Lubbers cure," included budget cuts, privatization of state-owned enterprises, and labor market reforms.

The cabinet also prioritized social reforms, such as healthcare and social security system improvements. It introduced legislation aimed at controlling rising healthcare costs and reforming the social security system to encourage individual responsibility.

Second Lubbers Cabinet (1986-1989): Following the elections in 1986, the CDA and VVD formed a coalition once again, resulting in the Second Lubbers Cabinet. This cabinet focused on continuing the economic and social reforms initiated in the previous term.

During this period, the Dutch economy experienced significant growth and prosperity. The cabinet implemented policies to improve labor market flexibility, attract foreign investment, and promote innovation and entrepreneurship. These efforts contributed to a reduction in unemployment and strengthened the Dutch economy.

Third Lubbers Cabinet (1989-1994): After the elections in 1989, the CDA and VVD once again formed a coalition, leading to the Third Lubbers Cabinet. This period was marked by a continuation of economic growth and social reforms.

The government further pursued market-oriented economic policies and continued implementing structural reforms. It aimed to liberalize various sectors of the economy, including telecommunications and transportation. The cabinet also worked towards European integration and participated actively in the creation of the European Single Market.

The Third Lubbers Cabinet also tackled social issues, such as education and immigration. It introduced educational reforms to improve the quality and accessibility of education in the Netherlands. The cabinet also implemented policies to address the integration of immigrants and promote multiculturalism.
14. 1994-2002

Answer: Wim Kok

Wim Kok was a Dutch politician who served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands from 1994 to 2002. He was a member of the Labour Party (PvdA) and a trade union leader by training. He was also the Minister of Economic Affairs from 1989 to 1994.

Kok was born in Bergambacht, Netherlands, in 1938. He studied economics at the Free University of Amsterdam and worked as a trade union leader before entering politics. He was elected to the House of Representatives in 1977 and became Prime Minister in 1994. He resigned as Prime Minister in 2002 but remained active in politics until his death in 2018.

Kok was a respected and influential figure in Dutch politics. He is remembered as a champion of social justice and economic prosperity.

The cabinet was criticized for its handling of the 1999 Kosovo War, which led to NATO airstrikes on Yugoslavia. The cabinet was accused of not doing enough to protect the Kosovar Albanians.

The cabinet was also affected by the 2002 murder of Pim Fortuyn, a right-wing politician who had been critical of the cabinet. Fortuyn's murder led to a wave of public anger and distrust of the government.

In the end, the cabinet was unable to overcome these challenges and it resigned in August 2002. The resignation of the Kok cabinet led to a period of political instability in the Netherlands. The next cabinet, led by Balkenende, was not formed until October 2002.
15. 2002-2010

Answer: Jan Peter Balkenende

Jan Peter Balkenende was a Dutch politician who served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands from 2002 to 2010. He was a member of the Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA) and a jurist by training. He was also the Minister of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment from 1998 to 2002.

Balkenende was born in Biezelinge, Netherlands, in 1956. He studied law at the University of Leiden and worked as a lawyer before entering politics. He was elected to the House of Representatives in 1998 and became Prime Minister in 2002. He resigned as Prime Minister in 2010 but remained active in politics until his retirement in 2017.

The First Balkenende Cabinet was formed in July 2002, following the assassination of Prime Minister Pim Fortuyn. It consisted of a coalition between the Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA), the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD), and the List Pim Fortuyn (LPF). The cabinet faced political instability and the need to address issues such as economic stagnation and rising social tensions.

During this period, the government focused on economic reforms and restoring public trust. The cabinet implemented measures to stimulate economic growth, reduce government deficits, and promote labor market flexibility. It also introduced policies to address concerns related to immigration, integration, and public safety. However, the First Balkenende Cabinet faced internal conflicts and struggled to maintain unity within the coalition. In October 2002, the LPF withdrew its support from the government, resulting in its collapse and the need for early elections.

After the early elections in 2003, the CDA formed a new coalition with the VVD, resulting in the Second Balkenende Cabinet. The government implemented economic policies aimed at strengthening the Dutch economy, including tax reforms and reductions in government spending. It also focused on social issues such as healthcare and education, introducing reforms to improve efficiency and accessibility in these sectors. During this period, the Second Balkenende Cabinet also had to address international matters, particularly the Dutch involvement in the military mission in Afghanistan and the ongoing debate on European integration.

Additionally, the Third Balkenende Cabinet prioritized sustainability and environmental issues. It promoted initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, increase renewable energy usage, and improve environmental regulations.

In the end, the cabinet was unable to overcome these challenges and it resigned in February 2010. The resignation of the Balkenende cabinet led to a period of political instability in the Netherlands. The next cabinet, led by Rutte, was not formed until October 2010.

Following the elections in 2006, the CDA formed a coalition with the Labour Party (PvdA) and the Christian Union (CU), resulting in the Third Balkenende Cabinet. This cabinet faced challenges such as the global financial crisis, rising unemployment rates, and increasing public discontent.

The government also faced debates on immigration and integration policies, as well as issues related to public safety and crime prevention.

In the end, the cabinet was unable to overcome these challenges and it resigned in February 2010. The resignation of the Balkenende cabinet led to a period of political instability in the Netherlands. The next cabinet, led by Rutte, was not formed until October 2010.
Source: Author piet

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