FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about Endangered The Northern Hairynosed Wombat
Quiz about Endangered The Northern Hairynosed Wombat

Endangered: The Northern Hairy-nosed Wombat Quiz


Once upon a time you could find the Northern hairy-nosed wombat all around the eastern states of Australia. Its habitat has now been restricted to just a tiny pocket of land. Come study this beautiful animal and the reasons for its declining population.

A multiple-choice quiz by Daaanieeel. Estimated time: 4 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. Animal Trivia
  6. »
  7. Wild Mammals
  8. »
  9. Marsupials and Monotremes

Author
Daaanieeel
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
353,991
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
708
Last 3 plays: Guest 72 (7/10), Jaydel (6/10), Guest 174 (4/10).
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. While they were once found all over the eastern states of Australia, the last known colony of Northern hairy-nosed wombats can now only be found in the Epping Forest National Park. In which Australian state can you find this park? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Which of these best describes the eating habits of the Northern hairy-nosed wombat? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Which of these best describes the preferred habitat of Northern hairy-nosed wombats? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. What is so unique about wombat pouches compared to most other marsupials? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. In the wild, what is the Northern hairy-nosed wombat's biggest predator? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. The Northern hairy-nosed wombat is nocturnal.


Question 7 of 10
7. Is there such thing as a Southern hairy-nosed wombat?


Question 8 of 10
8. How many joeys do female Northern hairy-nosed wombats give birth to per litter? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Which of these statements regarding the Northern hairy-nosed wombat IS NOT true? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. What is NOT one of the main reasons for the Northern hairy-nosed wombat's declining population? Hint



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Most Recent Scores
Apr 09 2024 : Guest 72: 7/10
Mar 05 2024 : Jaydel: 6/10
Feb 22 2024 : Guest 174: 4/10
Feb 22 2024 : Guest 73: 4/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. While they were once found all over the eastern states of Australia, the last known colony of Northern hairy-nosed wombats can now only be found in the Epping Forest National Park. In which Australian state can you find this park?

Answer: Queensland

Since European settlement, the Northern hairy-nosed wombat could be found all around Queensland and in some places of New South Wales. However, fossil records show that their range was once much larger and could also be found in Victoria, as well as a larger area of New South Wales.

Its last remaining habitat is a small, 300 hectare area of the Epping Forrest National Park in Queensland. This area has been fenced off and is regularly attended to by researches and park managers, who are the only ones allowed to enter.
2. Which of these best describes the eating habits of the Northern hairy-nosed wombat?

Answer: Herbivorous

The Northern hairy-nosed wombat is herbivorous. It feeds on the leaves of native grasses such as golden beard grass and black speargrass. Compared to other marsupials, it has a low metabolism, which means it doesn't have to eat every day. Its intestines are long and full of helpful digestive microorganisms. Unfortunately, the grasses it feeds on have had to compete for space with the introduced African buffel grass (Cenchrus ciliaris), which the wombat does not feed on, which means it has had less of a food source and this has contributed to their declining population. Fortunately, the area it can now be found in is cleared of this invasive grass and other threats.

Carnivorous animals eat only meat, omnivorous animals eat both meat and plants and insectivorous animals eat, you guessed it, insects.
3. Which of these best describes the preferred habitat of Northern hairy-nosed wombats?

Answer: Grasslands

Northern hairy-nosed wombats prefer a semi-arid grassland habitat. The area of the Epping Forest National Park in which they now live is grassland situated on an ancient water course. This means the soil is deep, sandy and good for digging! A place near trees is the ideal place for the wombats to place the large groups of burrows in which they live.

They feed in places with patches of scrub and native grasses.
4. What is so unique about wombat pouches compared to most other marsupials?

Answer: They face backwards

Like other wombats, the Northern hairy-nosed wombat's pouch faces backwards. This helps them when they're digging, so their babies don't get showered with dirt! Tasmanian devils, bilbies and bandicoots also have this feature.

Northern hairy-nosed wombats are about 1 metre (roughly 3 feet 3/8 inches) long, 35 centimetres (about 14 inches) and weigh in at a maximum 40 kilograms (88 pounds). Females are a bit heavier than males. They have very strong claws to help them dig and search for food and are brownish-grey in colour with silky fur. Compared to other wombats they have more pointed ears, a larger head and a hairy nose (in case you didn't pick that up from its name!) which is larger than the other two.
5. In the wild, what is the Northern hairy-nosed wombat's biggest predator?

Answer: Dingo

The dingo has been one of the biggest causes of the decreasing Northern hairy-nosed wombat population. In the space of two weeks in 2000, the Northern hairy-nosed wombat population was decreased from 113 individuals to less than 90 thanks to dingos, which greatly hindered conservational efforts. Because of this event, the Epping Forest National Park fenced off their remaining area to keep dingoes out.

The other animals never even come across the Northern hairy-nosed wombat!
6. The Northern hairy-nosed wombat is nocturnal.

Answer: True

Northern hairy-nosed wombats, along with other wombats, are nocturnal, meaning they are most active at night. They are particularly active at dusk and dawn. The day time of Epping Forest National Park is typically very hot, so it is likely they are nocturnal to avoid the heat.

In winter, they can occasionally be found during the day. They generally lives in their own burrows, which are located in large groups, but some wombats may share their burrows. The air in them is moist and doesn't vary much in temperature year round.

They mark the burrows they live in with urine and faeces. It takes an adult about one day to dig a burrow.
7. Is there such thing as a Southern hairy-nosed wombat?

Answer: Yes

The Southern hairy-nosed wombat is much more stable in population than the Northern hairy-nosed wombat. It is found on the Nullarbor Plain in South Australia, stretching to the New South Wales border, and in some places of Western Australia. It is the state animal of South Australia.

Its biggest physical difference from the Northern hairy-nosed wombat is its size as well as having a shorter muzzle.
8. How many joeys do female Northern hairy-nosed wombats give birth to per litter?

Answer: One

November-April during the wet season is the time in which the female will give birth to one young. Gestation lasts for 21 days. The young stay in the female's pouch for up to nine months. After 15 months or so they will leave their mothers. A good breeding season for the wombat would be one in which about 50% to 80% of females give birth. Northern hairy-nosed wombats live to about 23 years of age in the wild.
9. Which of these statements regarding the Northern hairy-nosed wombat IS NOT true?

Answer: Their best sense is sight

Eyesight is, in fact, their weakest sense. Unsurprisingly due to their large nose, their best sense is the sense of smell, which they rely on to find their food in the dark. They also have a strong sense of hearing.

Like rodents, the Northern hairy-nosed wombat's teeth never stop growing. This allows them even in their old age to grind their food.

Northern hairy-nosed wombats rarely have to drink and get most of their water from the grasses they feed on. This feature is similar to the koala, but they don't have to drink at all!

The Northern hairy-nosed wombat is the largest of the three wombats, with the Southern hairy-nosed wombat the smallest and the common wombat in the middle.
10. What is NOT one of the main reasons for the Northern hairy-nosed wombat's declining population?

Answer: Sold on the illegal pet trade

The IUCN ranks the Northern hairy-nosed wombat as critically endangered, while the Australian Species Profile and Threats Database ranks it as endangered. It is Australia's rarest marsupial. Perhaps the biggest challenge Northern hairy-nosed wombats face today is their already low population, with just over 100 individuals and even less breeding females.

This exposes them to diseases and the possibility of inbreeding. Severe weather events, such as droughts and bushfires, have taken its toll on the population, as droughts have caused the wombats to stop breeding and bushfires have destroyed their habitat. Competition for food and space with introduced species such as rabbits, cattle and sheep has limited their food supply, as well as the introduced African buffel grass, which competes with the grasses the wombat feeds on. Dingoes, which feed on the wombat, have also decreased the population. Thankfully, the Epping Forest National Park has worked tirelessly to prevent these dangers and protect the small remaining population.
Source: Author Daaanieeel

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor guitargoddess before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
Related Quizzes
This quiz is part of series Endangered Species:

The quizzes I've created on endangered species of the world.

  1. Endangered: The Alluring Tamaraw Average
  2. Endangered: The Maui's Dolphin Average
  3. Endangered: The Northern Hairy-nosed Wombat Average
  4. Endangered: The Leatherback Sea Turtle Average
  5. Endangered: The Chinese Alligator Average

4/14/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us