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Quiz about Code Breaker
Quiz about Code Breaker

Code Breaker Trivia Quiz


I'm sure you've all done Caesar codes and Cryptograms. Here are a few nonstandard codes occasionally used in puzzles that might be a bit more difficult to crack, but if you can recognize them, you are a step ahead!

A multiple-choice quiz by WesleyCrusher. Estimated time: 9 mins.
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Time
9 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
386,121
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Difficult
Avg Score
4 / 10
Plays
2170
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 51 (5/10), Guest 113 (0/10), dee1304 (10/10).
Question 1 of 10
1. Let's start with a simple but sometimes confusing code. It's as easy as 1,2,3 or A,B,C.

This 15-digit number represents a word: 138952251351420.

Which one?

Answer: (One Word. 11 letters)
Question 2 of 10
2. Based on the previous code, let's increase the difficulty. A simple mathematical operation is the key to and the solution of the following:

What word is represented by 361289441132425361?

Answer: (One Word, 7 letters.)
Question 3 of 10
3. Not every word can be encoded by the next numeric code. It's elemental, but certainly not elementary (and we have a whole subcategory on the site dedicated to a related encoding).

What science (not quite the one used in the code) is represented by 1513914616?

Answer: (One Word, 7 letters)
Question 4 of 10
4. Let's get away from numbers for a second. Beware of oncoming traffic!

What is DACR IGWYAEARALU?

Answer: (Two Words, 4+11 letters)
Question 5 of 10
5. How about mixing some letters and numbers? Computer experts among you will read this almost as easily as plain text of course!

What does 42696E617279204E756D626572 stand for?

Answer: (Two Words, 6+6 letters)
Question 6 of 10
6. The next code is also related to information technology - our older members may still recall the days when they needed it to quickly send messages. More modern devices made this somewhat obsolete.

What are you asking for when you send 344466 6633777?

Answer: (One Word, 6 letters)
Question 7 of 10
7. An almost uncrackable code is created when you base your encryption on a code table such as a book. You should however have an easy time recognizing which book I used here (in a rather royal edition) to encode a common London warning:

Gen 26:35,6 Rev 5:1,5 Ezek 22:30,19

Answer: (Three Words, 4+3+3 letters)
Question 8 of 10
8. To decode the next word, ignore the meaning of the letters entirely. All the information is in the case. Dash to the capital for lower dotted cases!

sHe iS Not in USA

Answer: (One Word, 5 letters)
Question 9 of 10
9. This code is another variant of the first (remember it?), but with a Roman twist that doesn't make things easier at all.

What does 1009 501182025 5995 mean ? (Spaces are in the correct positions)

Answer: (Three Words, 3+5+4 letters)
Question 10 of 10
10. For our last code, here's another one based on rearranging letters according to a very specific rule - it's not really difficult although it's often used for much longer texts which allows for some trial and error. A rectangle may help!

What is CGTAOORUTNNALIS?

Answer: (One Word, 15 letters)

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Most Recent Scores
May 09 2024 : Guest 51: 5/10
May 07 2024 : Guest 113: 0/10
Apr 18 2024 : dee1304: 10/10
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Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Let's start with a simple but sometimes confusing code. It's as easy as 1,2,3 or A,B,C. This 15-digit number represents a word: 138952251351420. Which one?

Answer: Achievement

15 digits encode 11 letters - so each digit is just less than one and a half letters? Not quite - it's just A=1, B=2, C=3 and so on to Z=26. You need to sometimes try several assignments - the initial 13 could be an M as well or the 22513 could be BYM, BBEAC or several other combinations.

1 3 8 9 5 22 5 13 5 14 20 = ACHIEVEMENT.
2. Based on the previous code, let's increase the difficulty. A simple mathematical operation is the key to and the solution of the following: What word is represented by 361289441132425361?

Answer: Squares

This also uses the A=1 to Z=26 assignments, but it squares each of the numbers before concatenating them into a long string.

361 289 441 1 324 25 361 = SQUARES.
3. Not every word can be encoded by the next numeric code. It's elemental, but certainly not elementary (and we have a whole subcategory on the site dedicated to a related encoding). What science (not quite the one used in the code) is represented by 1513914616?

Answer: Physics

This code is what we have as ChemSpell, but made harder by the fact that it uses the atomic numbers instead of the element names.

15 1 39 14 6 16 = Phosphorus Hydrogen Yttrium Silicon Carbon Sulphur = PHYSICS.
4. Let's get away from numbers for a second. Beware of oncoming traffic! What is DACR IGWYAEARALU?

Answer: Dual Carriageway

This could be called a scramble, but it has a strict pattern. To decode it, you need to start at both ends, alternating until you meet in the middle. I made it easy by actually starting on the left, some users of this code begin on the right for extra confusion!

Writing this code without errors is rather easy: Type two letters, hit "left" once, repeat until you are done. Then insert the spaces as per the original word lengths.
5. How about mixing some letters and numbers? Computer experts among you will read this almost as easily as plain text of course! What does 42696E617279204E756D626572 stand for?

Answer: Binary Number

Internet riddles love to use this encoding which is based on the computer's internal ASCII encoding of letters. Each pair of symbols is a hexadecimal number. 20 is a space, values from 41 to 5A are capital letters and 61 to 7A are lowercase. Digits are in the 30 to 39 range.

42 69 6E 61 72 79 20 4E 75 6D 62 65 72 = Binary Number.

When you see a string of digits and A to F that seems to have a lot of 6s and 7s in a puzzle, always suspect ASCII.
6. The next code is also related to information technology - our older members may still recall the days when they needed it to quickly send messages. More modern devices made this somewhat obsolete. What are you asking for when you send 344466 6633777?

Answer: Dinner

Users of not-so-smart mobile phones will probably fondly (or not so fondly) remember the days of thumbing out messages. With just eight numeric keys to represent the 26 letters, most of them required multiple keypresses and you had to make sure to insert the proper gaps when you needed two letters from the same key in succession.

3 4 66 66 33 777 is the sequence for DINNER. Without the number repetitions, this is also used for classic phone spelling: 1-800-4DINNER is the number 1-800-4346637.

(Note that the "Phoning:" quizzes on FunTrivia use a different matching between letters and digits than real-world phone spelling does.)
7. An almost uncrackable code is created when you base your encryption on a code table such as a book. You should however have an easy time recognizing which book I used here (in a rather royal edition) to encode a common London warning: Gen 26:35,6 Rev 5:1,5 Ezek 22:30,19

Answer: Mind the Gap

Using a code pad such as a book, both partners of a dialog have access to what makes for a very secure cipher. A typical encoding is page, paragraph, line, word but for the quiz I wanted to use a very obvious book, so I used the Bible (KJV) and just indicated the word within the verse.

Genesis 26:35 "Which were a grief of MIND unto Isaac and to Rebekah."
Revelation 5:1 "And I saw in THE right hand of him that sat on the throne a book written within and on the backside, sealed with seven seals."
Ezekiel 22:30 "And I sought for a man among them, that should make up the hedge, and stand in the GAP before me for the land, that I should not destroy it: but I found none."

(The latter is actually the only mention of "gap" in singular in the entire Bible.)
8. To decode the next word, ignore the meaning of the letters entirely. All the information is in the case. Dash to the capital for lower dotted cases! sHe iS Not in USA

Answer: Radio

If you find some seemingly meaningless text of only short words with weird, arbitrary capitalization in a puzzle, you should immediately think of Morse code. Almost always, capital letters mean the "bigger" dashes, so the above translates to

.-. .- -.. .. --- = RADIO.
9. This code is another variant of the first (remember it?), but with a Roman twist that doesn't make things easier at all. What does 1009 501182025 5995 mean ? (Spaces are in the correct positions)

Answer: mix dirty dice

A lot of zeroes and fives is a bit of a pointer towards this nasty encoding. It uses the A=1, B=2... pattern except when the letters form a Roman number in which case that one's translated (usually liberally, allowing combos such as IC as 99 and sometimes even LM as 950). Solving this code may require quite some backtracking.

Here we have (Roman numbers in caps): MIX DI r t y DIC e. (VICE works for the last word too)

Needless to say, puzzle builders will go great lengths to include lots of Vs, Xs and Cs in their texts when using this.
10. For our last code, here's another one based on rearranging letters according to a very specific rule - it's not really difficult although it's often used for much longer texts which allows for some trial and error. A rectangle may help! What is CGTAOORUTNNALIS?

Answer: Congratulations

This code is so easy it often gets overlooked in favor of more difficult ideas including cryptograms. All you need to do is to insert some line breaks and then read the letters column by column:

CGTAO
ORUTN
NALIS

reads as CON-GRA-TUL-ATI-ONS.
Source: Author WesleyCrusher

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor Fifiona81 before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
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