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Quiz about Cloak But No Dagger
Quiz about Cloak But No Dagger

Cloak But No Dagger Trivia Quiz


Cloaks, capes and similar items of clothing have long been symbols of elegance and high status, often with a dash of mystery and romance. This quiz, however, will concentrate on the cloaks and dispense with the daggers.

A photo quiz by LadyNym. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
LadyNym
Time
4 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
406,872
Updated
May 03 23
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
256
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: Guest 173 (9/10), Trivia_Fan54 (7/10), Luckycharm60 (8/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. Cloaks were widely used in classical antiquity. The traditional traveller's cloak known as chlamys was one of the attributes of which fast-moving Greek deity? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. In bygone times, cloaks and capes were fastened by implements, often stunning pieces of jewelry, named after a bone in a human body. Which one? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. In this detail from Jan van Eyck's stunning "Ghent Altarpiece", the singing angels are wearing copes - long, enveloping garments usually worn by which group of people? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Tilmātli (shown in the photo), serape and jorongo are names for cloak-like garments whose origins lie in which Latin American country? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. The burnous is the traditional hooded cloak worn by men in North Africa. What fibre is generally used to make this garment, very useful in the chilly desert nights? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. A garment reserved for royalty or as a sign of honour, this striking, brightly coloured ceremonial cloak from Hawaii is made from what natural material? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. With its distinctive gathered hood, the Kinsale cloak was a women's outer garment traditionally worn in which island country? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. A weatherproof men's overcoat of Scottish origin, the Inverness cape is often associated with what famous fictional detective? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. The enveloping black cloak traditionally worn in Venice at Carnival is known by what name - reminiscent of the inn in Geoffrey Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales"? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. The epitome of elegance for both men and women, this dramatic evening cloak is named after which form of artistic entertainment? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Cloaks were widely used in classical antiquity. The traditional traveller's cloak known as chlamys was one of the attributes of which fast-moving Greek deity?

Answer: Hermes

More similar to a blanket than to the cloaks worn in later eras, the Ancient Greek chlamys was a rectangular, bordered piece of woolen fabric usually worn pinned at the right shoulder. Generally used by travelers, messengers and soldiers, as shown by the statue of Hermes in the photo, it was often worn as the only item of clothing. Hermes, the messenger of the Olympian gods, was traditionally depicted as a young man wearing a chlamys, winged sandals, and a wide-brimmed sun hat. While in Ancient Greece the chlamys reached to the wearer's knees, in the Byzantine period it became an almost floor-length garment worn by emperors and high officials in ceremonial occasions.

The himation was another cloak-like outer garment worn in Ancient Greece: it was a larger piece of fabric that was worn wrapped around the body, leaving one arm free, rather than pinned on one shoulder like the chlamys.
2. In bygone times, cloaks and capes were fastened by implements, often stunning pieces of jewelry, named after a bone in a human body. Which one?

Answer: fibula

A fibula was a kind of brooch, consisting of a body and a pin connected by a spring or hinge (much like a safety pin), used to fasten cloaks or other garments. This implement was named after the fibula, or calf bone, whose shape it was thought to resemble. The earliest fibulae, dating from the Bronze Age, were made of bronze or iron, and utilitarian in design, resembling modern safety pins. In later eras, designs became much more varied and elaborate, and fibulae became decorative as well as practical items - often crafted of precious metals, enamel and gems, particularly in Late Antiquity. Cloaks were generally fastened at the right shoulder, though sometimes two matching pieces were employed, one for each shoulder. In the Middle Ages, around the 13th century, buttons replaced fibulae as fasteners, while brooches remained in use as pieces of decorative jewelry.

The photo shows the celebrated mosaic panel in Ravenna's Basilica of San Vitale depicting Emperor Justinian I surrounded by members of his court. The Emperor is wearing a purple chlamys fastened by a large, jeweled fibula.
3. In this detail from Jan van Eyck's stunning "Ghent Altarpiece", the singing angels are wearing copes - long, enveloping garments usually worn by which group of people?

Answer: clergy

Derived from the Latin "cappa" (like "cape" and "cap"), the word "cope" denotes a solemn ecclesiastical garment also known as "pluviale" (rain cape). A cope is a loose cloak, open at the front, held together by a band or an ornamented clasp called a morse. Copes are worn by members of the Roman Catholic and Anglican clergy, and occasionally also by Lutheran bishops. In the Catholic Church, the cope is reserved for processions and other solemn ceremonies, and is never worn by clergy while officiating Mass. Originally, copes had a hood, as they were primarily used outdoors; in more recent times, however, the hood has been replaced by an embroidered shield.

In Early Netherlandish painting (15th-16th century), angels are often depicted wearing copes made of rich fabrics embroidered in gold, silver and gems: notable examples are found in the work of major Flemish painters such as Jan van Eyck and Rogier van der Weyden. In that historical period, morses were extremely valuable pieces, often decorated with scenes from the Scriptures or the lives of saints, emphasizing the high status of the wearer.
4. Tilmātli (shown in the photo), serape and jorongo are names for cloak-like garments whose origins lie in which Latin American country?

Answer: Mexico

The tilmātli, or tilma, was a cloak or mantle worn in 15th- and 16th-century Mexico by Aztec men. Made of elaborately dyed cotton cloth for the upper classes, and plain agave fibre for commoners, this garment was worn draped over the shoulders (as in the photo), or knotted at the right shoulder, by members of the ruling classes and the clergy. On the other hand, men of the middle and lower classes wore it at the front like a long apron, and often used it as a carry-all. A famous tilmātli, worn by Saint Juan Diego, a young peasant to whom the Virgin Mary appeared in 1531, bears the impressed image of the Virgin, and is preserved in the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Mexico City.

The serape (also spelled "sarape") is a long, brightly coloured, blanket-like cloak traditionally woven from wool, and worn by Mexican men, especially in the colder highland regions; the jorongo is a version of the serape with an opening for the head, a Mexican version of the South American poncho.
5. The burnous is the traditional hooded cloak worn by men in North Africa. What fibre is generally used to make this garment, very useful in the chilly desert nights?

Answer: wool

A traditional outer garment of the Berber peoples of North Africa, a burnous (also spelled "burnoose") is a long, woolen cloak that usually comes in neutral colours such as beige, grey or brown. A white burnous, however, is worn by people of high status (such as the famous Emir Abdelkader, a 19th-century Algerian leader, depicted in the photo), or on important occasions. The name of this cloak, which often doubles up as a blanket, is believed by some to have derived from the Latin "birrus", a hooded cloak mentioned by Saint Augustine as a symbol of prestige; others, however, believe the word to be derived from the Berber "abernus".

More than a simple item of clothing, the burnous is a powerful cultural symbol for North African Berbers, who are often referred to as "those of the burnous" ("ashaab al-baaranis"). In the Ethiopian and Eritrean highlands, men wear an adaptation of the burnous called "bernos": it is made of dark-coloured felt, with a hooded point on one shoulder - apparently meant to accommodate a rifle. A white burnous is also part of the uniform of the Spahis, a light-cavalry regiment of the French Army originally based in North Africa.
6. A garment reserved for royalty or as a sign of honour, this striking, brightly coloured ceremonial cloak from Hawaii is made from what natural material?

Answer: feathers

Often mentioned in myths and folk tales, real-world feather cloaks have been used for centuries as symbols of high rank or respect by various cultures - especially those based in places where birds with brightly coloured plumage can be found. Some of the gorgeous feather cloaks crafted by Polynesian peoples can be admired in many of the world's museums. Hawaiian feather cloaks ("an'ahu'hula") like the one in the photo are made of feathers from various bird species (such as honeycreepers and honeyeaters), sewn in overlapping rows into a netting of fibre made from a local vine; the result was a smooth, velvet-like surface. One such cloak, known as the Kipuka cape (part of the Pacific Collection of the Australian Museum in Sydney), was one of seven presented to Captain James Cook by Chief Kalaniopu'u in 1778. Believed to give their wearer spiritual and physical protection against attacks, these cloaks were meant to be worn on special occasions.

In Māori culture, feather cloaks ("kahu huruhuru") are still used as marks of honour: in 2007, famed singer-songwriter Elton John was gifted a Māori feather cloak in recognition for his artistry and his frequent visits to New Zealand. In the past, Māori cloaks were often made of kiwi feathers, as revealed by DNA analysis.
7. With its distinctive gathered hood, the Kinsale cloak was a women's outer garment traditionally worn in which island country?

Answer: Ireland

Also known as the West Cork cloak, or simply the Irish cloak, the Kinsale cloak - named after a historic town and fishing port in southwestern Ireland - is believed to have originated in the Middle Ages, probably around the 14th century, or possibly even earlier. In the 17th and 18th centuries, this hooded, ankle-length cloak became mainly a women's garment, made of a dense, hard-wearing woolen fabric known as melton. The distinguishing feature of the Kinsale cloak is its full, gathered hood, rucked behind the neck and lined in satin, which frames the wearer's face and protects it from the elements. In West Cork, the cloak was usually black in colour, and often given by a mother as a present to a daughter who was getting married.

The Kinsale cloak almost went out of use after the Great Potato Famine of the mid-19th century, and the ensuing migration of a large part of the Irish population; however, it remained popular in County Cork, where it is still worn today, though not as frequently as before. The cloak can easily be bought online, and sewing patterns are also available for those who would like to try their hand at making one. Like other cloak styles, it is a popular costume choice for historical reenactments, such as Renaissance faires.
8. A weatherproof men's overcoat of Scottish origin, the Inverness cape is often associated with what famous fictional detective?

Answer: Sherlock Holmes

Named after the capital of the Scottish Highlands, the Inverness cape is an overcoat that, instead of sleeves, has a cape divided into two "wings" with holes from which the arms emerge. In its earliest version, dating from the 1850s, the sleeves were covered by a cape, but were eliminated a few decades later. The more formal version of the Inverness cape has lapels in the front, while the informal style (depicted in the photo, and often called a "coachman's cape") has a collar instead of lapels.

The Inverness cape has long been associated with Sherlock Holmes, who is depicted wearing the garment in the statue erected outside Arthur Conan Doyle's birthplace in Edinburgh. However, in Conan Doyle's stories Holmes is described as wearing an Ulster, a long coat with a short attached cape - or, occasionally, a long travelling cloak. Holmes' iconic tweed cape, as well as his distinctive deerstalker hat, were mostly the creation of illustrator Sidney Paget.

Inverness capes of heavy Harris tweed are still made today in Scotland, and exported all over the world. They are traditionally worn by the members of pipe bands, or with Highland dress. Being warm and weatherproof, the Inverness cape is also practical for country wear.
9. The enveloping black cloak traditionally worn in Venice at Carnival is known by what name - reminiscent of the inn in Geoffrey Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales"?

Answer: tabarro

The Italian word "tabarro" is related to the English "tabard", as they both derive from the Old French (of likely Germanic origin) "tabarde". However, while a tabard is a short, sleeveless coat, generally open at the sides, a tabarro is a long, circular cloak made of heavy, black woolen fabric, fastened below the chin, and worn with one end thrown over one shoulder. Probably derived from Greek and Roman cloak styles, in Renaissance Italy it was worn mostly by shepherds, labourers and craftsmen. However, in 17th- and 18th-century Venice, a black tabarro was traditionally worn during the Carnival season, together with the "bautta" (white mask) and "tricorno" (three-pointed hat) - as shown in Pietro Longhi's painting "Il ridotto" (The Casino) in the photo. The traditional Italian tabarro is still made by a few specialized companies, mostly based in Veneto, the region around Venice; in northern Italy there is also a club that organizes yearly meetings for fans of this dramatic garment.

"Il tabarro" is also the title of one of Giacomo Puccini's one-act operas, a dark tale of love, betrayal and revenge. The pilgrims in Geoffrey Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales" start their journey at the Tabard Inn in Southwark, London.
10. The epitome of elegance for both men and women, this dramatic evening cloak is named after which form of artistic entertainment?

Answer: opera

As its name suggests, an opera cloak is an outer garment meant to be worn over evening dress on formal social occasions, such as a night out at the opera, or a grand ball. Opera cloaks are luxurious, flamboyant items of clothing, made of rich fabrics such as velvet, brocade or cashmere, often lined in silk or satin, and trimmed with fur. Women's opera cloaks may also be decorated with embroidery, beading, lace, or feathers; some - especially those produced in the early 20th century, look like long, loose coats with wide, padded sleeves and showy lapels. A gentleman's evening attire was completed by a top hat (as shown in the photo), and occasionally also a walking stick; gloves were also a must for both men and women. A distinguishing feature of opera cloaks is its tall, elaborate collar, often held together by a clasp or a braided rope; the collar in the Regency-era illustration is lined in otter fur.

The 19th century was the heyday of the opera cloak. Now these beautiful, dramatic garments - like others mentioned in this quiz - can be bought from various online outlets, or made at home from sewing patterns.
Source: Author LadyNym

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor kyleisalive before going online.
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