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Quiz about Breastfeeding Myths
Quiz about Breastfeeding Myths

Breastfeeding Myths Trivia Quiz


Can you pick out the erroneous myths from true facts and accepted opinion? All questions are true/ false.

A multiple-choice quiz by carolinebee999. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Time
3 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
199,423
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
15
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
12 / 15
Plays
5562
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: herma1504 (13/15), chianti59 (13/15), Guest 98 (11/15).
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Question 1 of 15
1. You need to toughen your nipples before the baby is born to be able to breastfeed.


Question 2 of 15
2. A poorly attached baby can cause sore, painful or cracked nipples.


Question 3 of 15
3. After four weeks of age, babies do not need to be fed more often than every four hours.


Question 4 of 15
4. Being physically unable to breastfeed runs in some families.


Question 5 of 15
5. Thrush can cause searing pain in the breast and nipple.


Question 6 of 15
6. Breastfed babies are more likely to be fat than bottle-fed babies.


Question 7 of 15
7. Breastfeeding a son for too long will make him homosexual.


Question 8 of 15
8. In summer, breastfed babies need extra water in a bottle.


Question 9 of 15
9. Feeding a baby too often will spoil him or her.


Question 10 of 15
10. You need to drink milk to make milk.


Question 11 of 15
11. For the first few days after a baby is born, its mother produces a very small amount of a special milk called colostrum. Full breast milk usually is not made until a few days after the baby is born.


Question 12 of 15
12. You should wean when baby gets his or her back teeth.


Question 13 of 15
13. Women with very small breasts cannot breastfeed.


Question 14 of 15
14. Breastfed babies are healthier than formula-fed ones.


Question 15 of 15
15. Some babies with high birthweights are just too big for their mothers to breastfeed.



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Most Recent Scores
Jul 22 2024 : herma1504: 13/15
Jul 22 2024 : chianti59: 13/15
Jul 13 2024 : Guest 98: 11/15
Jul 10 2024 : Brooklyn1447: 11/15
Jul 03 2024 : poetkah: 13/15
Jun 30 2024 : Aph1976: 11/15
Jun 29 2024 : DHANI12: 11/15
Jun 28 2024 : lindamclean755: 11/15
Jun 28 2024 : RicD: 12/15

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. You need to toughen your nipples before the baby is born to be able to breastfeed.

Answer: False

There is no evidence to suggest this, and common medical opinion is that is more likely to do harm than good. Nipples are meant to be soft.
Far more important in avoiding nipple pain is correct attachment.
2. A poorly attached baby can cause sore, painful or cracked nipples.

Answer: True

Poor attachment is the major cause of nipple pain and cracked nipples.
3. After four weeks of age, babies do not need to be fed more often than every four hours.

Answer: False

Babies vary in the amount of feeding they need, and many factors such as the milk supply, the baby's birthweight, illness of mother or baby and the efficiency of the baby's feeding, play a part. It is commonly accepted that many babies will need feeding more often than four-hourly, even after 4 weeks of age, and that the mother should feed her baby when s/he needs to be fed rather than sticking to a schedule.
4. Being physically unable to breastfeed runs in some families.

Answer: False

There is no evidence to support familial or genetic factors involved in physiological failure of breastfeeding. The few physiological reasons to not be able to breastfeed are unlikely to be passed on in families.
However, it is likely that a woman may have less support if she is surrounded by other women who have not managed to breastfeed. If a mother is motivated to breastfeed and does not have role models in her family, she would benefit from joining a support group during pregnancy, where breastfeeding is talked about and encouraged, and where she can see other babies who are breastfed.
5. Thrush can cause searing pain in the breast and nipple.

Answer: True

A thrush infection can be very painful. The thrush is usually present in the baby's mouth as well, and both mother and baby need to be treated by a health professional.
6. Breastfed babies are more likely to be fat than bottle-fed babies.

Answer: False

There is no evidence to suggest this. Statistically, breast-fed babies put on more weight in the first three months than bottle-fed ones, and after three months put on less. Traditional tables are not very accurate for this reason. Some studies have shown, however, that breastfed babies are less likely to be overweight as children and as adults.
7. Breastfeeding a son for too long will make him homosexual.

Answer: False

Nonsense! This ridiculous myth is so ludicrous I will say no more.
8. In summer, breastfed babies need extra water in a bottle.

Answer: False

In summer a breastfed baby will want to feed more often. This frequent suckling will supply the baby with a larger quantity of milk, but the milk will tend to be more watery, thus perfectly supplying the baby's need of nutrients and more fluids. The mother should be responsive to her baby's need for more frequent feeds.
9. Feeding a baby too often will spoil him or her.

Answer: False

There is no evidence to suggest this. If anything, breastfeeding has been linked to good bonding, and a child who has a good relationship with its mother is probably LESS likely to be spoilt.
10. You need to drink milk to make milk.

Answer: False

Breastmilk is made by the mother's body from a range of nutrients in her food. While milk can play part of a balanced diet at all stages in a woman's life, it is not necessary provided the nutrients (e.g. calcium and phosphorus) are found in another source. An adequate fluid intake (enough to satisfy her thirst) and a good, varied diet are what is needed.
11. For the first few days after a baby is born, its mother produces a very small amount of a special milk called colostrum. Full breast milk usually is not made until a few days after the baby is born.

Answer: True

For the first few days, the baby is drinking a nutrient-rich fluid called colostrum, which is low in quantity but very high in anti-infective properties. This is all the baby needs for this time. It is usually about three days until full breastmilk is produced. This milk continually changes over the course of lactation to meet the changing needs of the growing baby.
12. You should wean when baby gets his or her back teeth.

Answer: False

The best time to wean is when mother and baby are both ready, however there is no exact time when weaning is best. Babies can easily be taught not to bite when their teeth come through.
13. Women with very small breasts cannot breastfeed.

Answer: False

The ability to produce milk depends on the amount of breast tissue present. The size of breasts is largely determined by the amount of fat in the breasts. The two are not related. In fact, small-breasted women commonly report a welcome change in their bustline when pregnant and breastfeeding.
14. Breastfed babies are healthier than formula-fed ones.

Answer: True

As a statistical average, this is very true. Breastfed babies have a (much) lower incidence of gastrointestinal infections due to the sterile delivery as well as the anti-infective properties in breastmilk (such as antibodies, neutrophils, lactoferrin etc).
Breastfed babies also tend to get less sick from airborne viral and bacterial illnesses because of these anti-infective properties which are alive in the breastmilk and help to fight illness in the baby, especially if the mother has already been exposed to the specific illness.
Breastfed babies benefit from better speech, eyesight and jaw development. Some studies have also shown a lower incidence of various other illnesses in breastfed babies (eg. allergies, diabetes, SIDS and heart disease).
15. Some babies with high birthweights are just too big for their mothers to breastfeed.

Answer: False

Take this from the mother of an 11 lb (5kg) baby! The female body is very adaptable and the frequency and strength of a larger baby's sucking stimulates the body to make a larger quantity of milk (just ask the mother of a breastfeeding 6 month old, or twins).

A larger baby may need more frequent or longer feeds, or they may be an efficient feeder who takes less time to feed than a smaller baby.
Source: Author carolinebee999

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor crisw before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
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