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Quiz about High Road Low Road
Quiz about High Road Low Road

High Road, Low Road Trivia Quiz


Whichever road we take, we'll end up in Scotland, but how much do you know about the country? Taking this quiz will help you find out.

A multiple-choice quiz by rossian. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
rossian
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
338,041
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
3737
Awards
Editor's Choice
Last 3 plays: mfc (9/10), Guest 86 (9/10), Guest 108 (9/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. During their occupation of Britain, what name did the Romans give to the area now known as Scotland? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. The patron saint of Scotland is Saint Andrew. On which day is his feast day celebrated? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. A traditional Scottish food is the Arbroath Smokie. Which type of fish is smoked to produce this? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. In 1603 James I became King of England following the death of Elizabeth I. He had been King of Scotland since 1567, ruling under which name? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. The unofficial anthem of Scotland is 'Flower of Scotland', which is a traditional song dating from the 14th century.


Question 6 of 10
6. The date 25th January is an important date in Scotland as it honours the birth date of which of these famous Scots? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. The Stone of Scone, or Coronation Stone, was taken from Scotland in 1296 by Edward I. It was returned to Scotland in 1996 and is now kept where? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Which Scottish city is known as 'The Fair City'? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. The quiz title comes from the song lyrics 'Oh ye'll tak' the high road and I'll tak' the low road' which are about which Scottish loch? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Which flower is considered to be the national emblem of Scotland? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Mar 31 2024 : mfc: 9/10
Mar 31 2024 : Guest 86: 9/10
Mar 28 2024 : Guest 108: 9/10
Mar 26 2024 : Guest 87: 10/10
Mar 24 2024 : Guest 82: 10/10
Mar 22 2024 : bradez: 9/10
Mar 21 2024 : Guest 75: 3/10
Mar 18 2024 : Guest 1: 6/10
Mar 18 2024 : Guest 2: 10/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. During their occupation of Britain, what name did the Romans give to the area now known as Scotland?

Answer: Caledonia

The Romans did not conquer the whole of Scotland with the original northern boundary of their empire being Hadrian's Wall, running from the river Tyne on the east coast to the Solway Firth on the west coast in the north of England. They eventually pushed further into Scotland, building the Antonine Wall from the Firth of Forth to the Firth of Clyde, but withdrew after only twenty years.

The name of Caledonia is still used, often in a poetic way. Hibernia was the Roman name for Ireland, Cambria was Wales and Helvetia was Switzerland.
2. The patron saint of Scotland is Saint Andrew. On which day is his feast day celebrated?

Answer: 30th November

Andrew, the apostle and brother of Saint Peter, has been the patron saint of Scotland since the middle of the tenth century. According to legend, his relics were brought to the town of St. Andrews, although the town is probably better known as being the home of golf. Saint Andrew is also the patron saint of Greece, Romania and Russia. 1 March is Saint David's Day, 17th March is Saint Patrick's Day and 23rd April is Saint George's Day.

These are the patron saints of Wales, Ireland and England respectively.
3. A traditional Scottish food is the Arbroath Smokie. Which type of fish is smoked to produce this?

Answer: Haddock

Arbroath is in the council area of Angus, and lies on the east coast of Scotland, sixteen miles to the north of Dundee. The smoking of haddock is a traditional skill with the fish being salted and dried before being smoked in special barrels. Under European Law, the name of Arbroath Smokie is protected and can only be used for fish from the area.
4. In 1603 James I became King of England following the death of Elizabeth I. He had been King of Scotland since 1567, ruling under which name?

Answer: James VI

James was the son of Mary, Queen of Scots. His mother was forced to abdicate as Queen of Scotland when James was only just over a year old and he did not gain control of his kingdom until 1581. When Elizabeth I died without a direct heir, James became the next English monarch as his mother was a cousin of Elizabeth. Elizabeth herself had not officially named a successor but her political advisors had already negotiated with the Scottish king, who was declared king of England immediately after Elizabeth's death.
5. The unofficial anthem of Scotland is 'Flower of Scotland', which is a traditional song dating from the 14th century.

Answer: False

The song was written by Roy Williamson of the folk group called 'The Corries' in the mid 1960s. It was popularised among the Scottish rugby union team originally and became their anthem in the 1990 Five Nations championship. Its use has now spread to the Scottish football (soccer) team and it was also used as the anthem for the Scottish team at the 2010 Commonwealth Games.

The words commemorate the Scottish victory at the Battle of Bannockburn, when they defeated England's Edward II in 1314.
6. The date 25th January is an important date in Scotland as it honours the birth date of which of these famous Scots?

Answer: Robert Burns

Robert Burns was born in 1759 and is regarded as Scotland's national poet. He wrote the words for 'Auld Lang Syne', sung traditionally at New Year or Hogmanay as it is known in his home land. Other well known words are 'Red, Red Rose', 'To a Mouse' and 'Tam o' Shanter'. Burns Night is celebrated around the world with a haggis being ceremoniously brought to the table accompanied by the playing of bagpipes.

The other options are all well known Scots.
7. The Stone of Scone, or Coronation Stone, was taken from Scotland in 1296 by Edward I. It was returned to Scotland in 1996 and is now kept where?

Answer: Edinburgh Castle

The stone is also known as the Stone of Destiny and was used in the coronation of Scottish monarchs at Scone Abbey. It was taken to Westminster Abbey in London where it was fitted into a chair known as 'King Edward's Chair', named for King Edward the Confessor who was king of England between 1042 and 1066.

The chair has been used as part of the coronation ceremony for British monarchs ever since, with only two exceptions. It was returned to Scotland in a symbolic gesture with the proviso that it must be returned to Westminster Abbey when needed for the next coronation of a monarch.

It is now kept in Edinburgh Castle with other items from Scotland's history.
8. Which Scottish city is known as 'The Fair City'?

Answer: Perth

Sir Walter Scott published his novel called 'The Fair Maid of Perth' in 1828 and the city was quick to adopt the name as its nickname. It is situated on Scotland's longest river, the Tay, and there is evidence of habitation there from prehistoric times. Scone Abbey was situated only two miles away, so Perth became an important town due to the royal connections. Of the other options, only Aberdeen has a well established nickname, being known as the 'Granite City' due to the large number of granite buildings there.
9. The quiz title comes from the song lyrics 'Oh ye'll tak' the high road and I'll tak' the low road' which are about which Scottish loch?

Answer: Lomond

The lyrics continue 'And I'll be in Scotland afore ye; But me and my true love will never meet again; On the bonnie, bonnie banks of Loch Lomond'. The song was first published in 1841 and is usually interpreted as being written about a Jacobite rebel (or patriot, if you are Scottish) who has been sentenced to death. Loch Lomond is the largest lake by surface area in mainland Britain although Loch Ness, famous for its supposed inhabitant, is larger by volume of water.
10. Which flower is considered to be the national emblem of Scotland?

Answer: Thistle

The thistle has been the official flower of Scotland since the 13th century, apparently because a Norse invader trod on one, cried out in pain and thus gave away their intended attack to the defenders. The highest order of chivalry in Scotland is the 'Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle' which was instituted in 1687 by King James VII of Scotland, who was also King James II of England.

The rose is the symbol of England, the daffodil represents Wales and the shamrock belongs to Ireland.
Source: Author rossian

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor gtho4 before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
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