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Quiz about Sigmund the Subliminal Sleuth
Quiz about Sigmund the Subliminal Sleuth

Sigmund the Subliminal Sleuth Trivia Quiz


The Ringmaster is dead and all of the other circus workers are too scared to tell the police what they know. Sigmund, who solves crimes by asking questions designed to elicit subconscious confessions, has been called to the scene of the crime.

A multiple-choice quiz by looney_tunes. Estimated time: 8 mins.
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Author
looney_tunes
Time
8 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
322,280
Updated
Apr 11 22
# Qns
25
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
21 / 25
Plays
1764
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: Guest 50 (24/25), Guest 24 (20/25), Guest 24 (22/25).
Question 1 of 25
1. The crime scene suggests that one of the four knife throwers in the circus must be guilty, but they were all seen eating breakfast at the time of the murder. Sigmund begins his examination of the witnesses' subconscious ideas by asking a woman nearby him to sing a song that represents her role in the show. She sings: "He'd fly through air with the greatest of ease, the daring young man on the...". What completes this lyric? Hint


Question 2 of 25
2. Sigmund hears a chap talking in an Australian accent and asks him to describe his work. The man says, "I spend my days standing behind the rotating head of a row of funny men in Sideshow Alley while kids feed 'em ping pong balls. My game's called..." What words correctly complete his response? Hint


Question 3 of 25
3. A young boy wearing a clown costume is the next person under Sigmund's gaze. "Tell me son," says Sigmund, "describe the most important tool in your act." The boy replies, "Well sir, it's a vehicle with only one wheel. I guess you'd know it as a ..." Which of the following accurately completes his answer? Hint


Question 4 of 25
4. Sigmund sees an old man sitting away from the crowd and asks him to explain his role in the circus. The man says, "In the early twentieth century there were acts like mine in many a circus, but it has gone out of fashion. I ask spectators to look through Fresnel lenses to watch my tiny performers at work. My attraction is the..." How does he finish this statement? Hint


Question 5 of 25
5. Sigmund sees a woman treating blisters in her mouth and begins to question her. "Well, there is no real secret to this," she says, "You just have to tolerate pain if you want to work in the art of ..." What name does she provide for her talent? Hint


Question 6 of 25
6. Sigmund sees four clowns rehearsing their tumbles and stops to ask them whether it is true that, in the latter half of the twentieth century, Ringling Brothers ran a Clown College to train people in this art. What did the truthful clown tell him? Hint


Question 7 of 25
7. There is a small woman sunbaking on a safety net. Sigmund apologises for disturbing her and asks if this net is part of her act. She says, "Why, yes it is. In my act I am a projectile, and this net breaks my fall. I am a..." How does she describe herself? Hint


Question 8 of 25
8. Sigmund sees a man and a woman, apparently rehearsing their act, working together to make interesting shapes with their bodies. The woman turns to Sigmund and says, "I am the flier and Ralph here is the base. In our act we perform the Swizzle, the Flying Whale and the Reverse Candle. Our act is..." What title does she give their act? Hint


Question 9 of 25
9. A man carrying a large leather pouch walks by and Sigmund asks him to describe his work. "Well, I have had to learn to hyper-extend my neck and relax my upper oesophageal sphincter in order to perform my act. Put simply, I'm a..." What does he say he is? Hint


Question 10 of 25
10. Sigmund finds a woman cracking a whip loudly and asks her if it is part of her act. "Oh yes," she says, "but though the audience may think the whip is what keeps things under control, it's really just for show. The real stars of my show act on my hand and voice signals. I train..." What does she say she prepares for their performances? Hint


Question 11 of 25
11. Far away from the animal cages, Sigmund sees a group of acrobats and dancers rehearsing. He asks them what they do and a friendly man replies, "We are part of another circus, only here for a special double-header performance. We use our skills to deliver a show that tells a story, and we don't have any animals in our acts. Our circus is designed in the recent French tradition of ..." How does he finish this sentence? Hint


Question 12 of 25
12. A stern looking woman is standing outside a caravan containing several bears. Sigmund asks her if she is part of the circus' bear act and she replies in a thick Russian accent, "Da! I train ze bears to play hockey on ..." How does she finish this sentence to describe an act which is popular in Russian circus performances? Hint


Question 13 of 25
13. A young man is washing a small elephant with unusually large ears, and Sigmund wanders over towards them. "This is a handsome beast," Sigmund says, "What is his name?" The man replies, "He was named after a flying elephant in a Walt Disney animated classic. I'm sure you've guessed his name is..." What is the elephant's name? Hint


Question 14 of 25
14. Sigmund stops to buy a hot dog and asks the elderly vendor how he came to join the circus. "I fell in love with the idea when I was one of 1,400 people who appeared in a 1952 film directed by Cecil B. DeMille that was set in a circus. The film was 'The Greatest Show On...'." What is the last word in the film's title? Hint


Question 15 of 25
15. Sigmund sees an elderly woman smoking near a large tent. "Be careful," he warns her, "many people believe the massive Hartford circus fire of 1944 may well have been started by a carelessly dropped cigarette." She replies, "Oh, you mean 'the day the clowns cried'. It was a huge disaster." Which of the following statements could she truthfully tell Sigmund? Hint


Question 16 of 25
16. Sigmund sees a young man carrying a long pole and stops to ask him why he has it. The man replies: "It's a balancing pole and I use it in my act. My skill is funambulism, which you may know as..." How does the man finish his sentence? Hint


Question 17 of 25
17. Sigmund sees two acrobats using their legs to propel two other performers into the air, and is impressed to see the artists easily meeting feet to feet after the aerobatic tumbles are complete. Sigmund asks them about their act. He is told: "Our act is sometimes called human juggling, but its correct name derives from a character in Greek mythology who flew too close to the sun. His name was ..." Hint


Question 18 of 25
18. A man applying makeup calls Sigmund over and tells him: "Possibly no performers remind people of the circus more than those who practice my art, though popular culture sometimes portrays us in a negative light. Examples include Krusty from 'The Simpsons', Stephen King's Pennywise and Batman's arch enemy The Joker. I am a ..." Hint


Question 19 of 25
19. Overhead, Sigmund sees a woman sitting in something that looks like a hula hoop. "What's your act called?" he shouts up to her. What does she answer? Hint


Question 20 of 25
20. Sigmund sees a man wearing a safari suit, who is carrying a whip and a chair. As the man heads towards the animal cages Sigmund calls out: "Sir! What is your act?" What answer does the man provide? Hint


Question 21 of 25
21. Over near the popcorn stand Sigmund hears a man singing a very familiar tune that goes: 'doot-doot doodle-oodel-oot-doot doodet'. "Tell me my good man, by what name do you call that melody?" How does the man reply? Hint


Question 22 of 25
22. Sigmund looks inside a tent and sees a woman setting up what looks like an old-fashioned miniature circus. He asks the woman to point out her favourite part of the display and she picks out an ornately painted carriage. "This is how old-time circus folk used to get around," she explains, "it's a circus ..." How does she finish this sentence? Hint


Question 23 of 25
23. Sigmund sees a young man painting a gold bridle onto a wooden horse that seems to have been impaled on a pole. "That's some horse you have there," Sigmund remarks, "Tell me, what do you do in this circus?" What does the man reply? Hint


Question 24 of 25
24. Sigmund is passing the circus band and he stops to ask them to name their favourite song. The tuba player replies: "Well, let's see. I like the one about an elephant who 'packed her trunk and said goodbye to the circus'. It's got a ripping tuba part. The song's called...". How does he finish this statement? Hint


Question 25 of 25
25. Sigmund looks back over his notes and realises that, once again, his witnesses have revealed a subliminal message that will help him solve the crime. Take the first letter of the correct answers to questions 1-24 of this quiz (in order) to find the clue which has helped Sigmund solve the crime. He realises that one of his four suspects is guilty because their alibi can be disputed. Which knife thrower does he accuse? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The crime scene suggests that one of the four knife throwers in the circus must be guilty, but they were all seen eating breakfast at the time of the murder. Sigmund begins his examination of the witnesses' subconscious ideas by asking a woman nearby him to sing a song that represents her role in the show. She sings: "He'd fly through air with the greatest of ease, the daring young man on the...". What completes this lyric?

Answer: Flying Trapeze

Sigmund: "Ah yes, that song was first published in 1867, but it was not released as a recording until 1934. You know, when I solved the Case of the Licentious Leopard-Skin Leotard, I learned that the song 'The Daring Young Man on the Flying Trapeze' was actually inspired by a young French man who was expected to become a lawyer, but instead joined the circus.

His name, Jules Leotard, might sound a little familiar to you since the skin-tight suit he wore for his performances is now named after him."
2. Sigmund hears a chap talking in an Australian accent and asks him to describe his work. The man says, "I spend my days standing behind the rotating head of a row of funny men in Sideshow Alley while kids feed 'em ping pong balls. My game's called..." What words correctly complete his response?

Answer: Laughing clowns

Sigmund: "I see the calibre of prizes on your stand is what I have come to expect from a laughing clowns game - plastic necklaces, false moustaches and enormous teddy bears stuffed with polystyrene beads. I learned to love this game when I solved the Case of the Sydney Sideshow Strangler. I watched hordes of Aussie kids thrusting ping pong balls into the rotating mouths of the mechanised clowns, hoping their balls would land in a numbered slot that would win them the prize of their choice."
3. A young boy wearing a clown costume is the next person under Sigmund's gaze. "Tell me son," says Sigmund, "describe the most important tool in your act." The boy replies, "Well sir, it's a vehicle with only one wheel. I guess you'd know it as a ..." Which of the following accurately completes his answer?

Answer: Unicycle

Sigmund: "I see you have a nice wide tyre on your unicycle, and I'm guessing that's to help you balance on that tightrope over there. Very impressive, but I am also astounded by the distance that some people can travel on their unicycles. When I was in Nova Scotia in 2008, solving the Case of the Horrible Halifax Heckler, I witnessed the end of an 800km unicycle relay race called 'Ride the Lobster'."
4. Sigmund sees an old man sitting away from the crowd and asks him to explain his role in the circus. The man says, "In the early twentieth century there were acts like mine in many a circus, but it has gone out of fashion. I ask spectators to look through Fresnel lenses to watch my tiny performers at work. My attraction is the..." How does he finish this statement?

Answer: Flea circus

Sigmund: "I tip my hat to you sir. I was once asked to look into the Case of the Felonious Frisco Flea Circus Fraud, but the investigation was disbanded because it turned out that creating the illusion of performing fleas is now considered a legitimate approach to this attraction. I see you have the real thing. I'm glad to note you have abandoned the old technique of gluing fleas to the bottom of their enclosure."
5. Sigmund sees a woman treating blisters in her mouth and begins to question her. "Well, there is no real secret to this," she says, "You just have to tolerate pain if you want to work in the art of ..." What name does she provide for her talent?

Answer: Fire eating

Sigmund: "I do enjoy the spectacle of fire eating. When I was in Germany solving the Case of the Hamburg Hamburger Heist, which, incidentally, gave me the record for the heaviest haul of stolen meat ever recovered by an amateur detective, I witnessed another world record being claimed. On the 13th of September 2008, Hubertus Wawra, aka 'Master of Hellfire', extinguished 68 flaming torches in his mouth in 60 seconds."
6. Sigmund sees four clowns rehearsing their tumbles and stops to ask them whether it is true that, in the latter half of the twentieth century, Ringling Brothers ran a Clown College to train people in this art. What did the truthful clown tell him?

Answer: "Yes. There was a clown college in the USA from 1968-1997."

Clown: "You might not remember me Sigmund, but many years ago when you were solving the Case of the Baraboo Brickyard Bomber I was the young boy who followed you around taking notes. Back then, I wanted to be a detective, but in the 1990s the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Clown College moved to Baraboo, Wisconsin, and I joined up.

Originally, the college was established to help train young people as clowns to combat the fact that the circus's clowns were all getting quite old."
7. There is a small woman sunbaking on a safety net. Sigmund apologises for disturbing her and asks if this net is part of her act. She says, "Why, yes it is. In my act I am a projectile, and this net breaks my fall. I am a..." How does she describe herself?

Answer: Human cannonball

Sigmund: "I met a gunpowder merchant, when I was investigating the Fresno Faulty Fireworks Fiasco, who told me that he sold quite a lot of gunpowder to the human cannonball of a circus that was traveling through. I found this strange at the time because I know that human cannonballs are usually propelled into the air by either a spring or compressed air. Later I discovered that circus acts often also add a touch of gunpowder as a special effect."
8. Sigmund sees a man and a woman, apparently rehearsing their act, working together to make interesting shapes with their bodies. The woman turns to Sigmund and says, "I am the flier and Ralph here is the base. In our act we perform the Swizzle, the Flying Whale and the Reverse Candle. Our act is..." What title does she give their act?

Answer: Acrobalance

Sigmund: "I have encountered acrobalance only once before. While I was in Las Vegas solving the Case of the Shoplifting Showgirls, there was an acrobalance act that was the talk of the town. I was lucky enough to meet the performers who told me that acrobalance is a combination of two other performance types, adagio and hand balancing, and that it is becoming increasingly popular in modern circus."
9. A man carrying a large leather pouch walks by and Sigmund asks him to describe his work. "Well, I have had to learn to hyper-extend my neck and relax my upper oesophageal sphincter in order to perform my act. Put simply, I'm a..." What does he say he is?

Answer: Sword swallower

Sigmund: "What an amazing ancient art! When I was investigating the Case of the Deadly Delhi Dinner, I met a man who told me that the art of sword swallowing originated in India more than 4,000 years ago. At the beginning of the twenty-first century there were about 100 people registered with the Sword Swallowers Association International as being actively engaged in performing this skill."
10. Sigmund finds a woman cracking a whip loudly and asks her if it is part of her act. "Oh yes," she says, "but though the audience may think the whip is what keeps things under control, it's really just for show. The real stars of my show act on my hand and voice signals. I train..." What does she say she prepares for their performances?

Answer: Animals

Sigmund: "I see you have a fine herd of horses and camels here, and I see that you have followed modern training techniques that rely upon teaching animals to understand and co-operate rather than beating them into submission. Actually, I haven't seen such fine camels since I was in Somalia investigating the Case of the Mogadishu Marauder.

In the end the suspect escaped on a dashing dromedary."
11. Far away from the animal cages, Sigmund sees a group of acrobats and dancers rehearsing. He asks them what they do and a friendly man replies, "We are part of another circus, only here for a special double-header performance. We use our skills to deliver a show that tells a story, and we don't have any animals in our acts. Our circus is designed in the recent French tradition of ..." How does he finish this sentence?

Answer: Nouveau cirque

Sigmund: "Ah yes, I met Franco Dragone of Cirque du Soleil in the early 1990s when I was in Montreal solving the Murder of Monsignor Morrible. Since you are performers of the genre, I'm sure you know Cirque du Soleil is a French Canadian group famous for performances in the nouveau cirque tradition.

Their show titled 'Saltimbanco', which told a story around the theme of multiculturalism and immigration, toured the world from 1992 to 2006, with a revised arena version debuting in 2007."
12. A stern looking woman is standing outside a caravan containing several bears. Sigmund asks her if she is part of the circus' bear act and she replies in a thick Russian accent, "Da! I train ze bears to play hockey on ..." How does she finish this sentence to describe an act which is popular in Russian circus performances?

Answer: Ice skates

Sigmund: "Quite an act indeed. In 2009, when I was in Bishkek investigating the case of the Killer Kyrgyz Kumis (kumis is the national drink of Kyrgyzstan of which Bishkek is the capital city), I witnessed a most unfortunate accident. The Russian State Circus was on tour with their show 'Bears on Ice' when a five year old bear, wearing his ice skates, killed a director during rehearsal."
13. A young man is washing a small elephant with unusually large ears, and Sigmund wanders over towards them. "This is a handsome beast," Sigmund says, "What is his name?" The man replies, "He was named after a flying elephant in a Walt Disney animated classic. I'm sure you've guessed his name is..." What is the elephant's name?

Answer: Dumbo

Sigmund: "You know, the first mystery I ever solved was the Case of the Predatory Pittsburgh Projectionist in 1941. One small fringe benefit of working on that case was sitting through the movies being shown in the suspect's theatre. That year, Disney released 'Dumbo', which is often said to be one of the studio's finest films.

It was made to recover the financial losses of 'Fantasia' which some purists consider a finer piece of work."
14. Sigmund stops to buy a hot dog and asks the elderly vendor how he came to join the circus. "I fell in love with the idea when I was one of 1,400 people who appeared in a 1952 film directed by Cecil B. DeMille that was set in a circus. The film was 'The Greatest Show On...'." What is the last word in the film's title?

Answer: Earth

Sigmund: "Well then, it's possible we may have met before. I saved the life of an innocent canine when I was called to the set to solve the Case of the Dangerous Drunken Dog. I met some of the film's big stars, including Charlton Heston, James Stewart and Betty Hutton, but I made sure to talk to a whole bunch of other people too. Given the size of the cast, that was quite a feat.

When I went to the theatre to see the film, I felt it captured the spirit of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus very well and that it really deserved the Academy Award it won for Best Picture."
15. Sigmund sees an elderly woman smoking near a large tent. "Be careful," he warns her, "many people believe the massive Hartford circus fire of 1944 may well have been started by a carelessly dropped cigarette." She replies, "Oh, you mean 'the day the clowns cried'. It was a huge disaster." Which of the following statements could she truthfully tell Sigmund?

Answer: "Nearly 900 people were killed or injured according to best estimates."

Sigmund: "When I went to Hartford, Connecticut, to investigate the Infamous Indian Ivory Insurance Scam - Hartford is nicknamed 'The Insurance Capital of the World' - I met a survivor of that disaster. During a performance of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus the big top became engulfed in flames which spread quickly because the tent's canvas had been waterproofed with a flammable substance.

There is debate about the precise death toll, though it is believed to have been around 168, and over 700 people were treated for injuries. Roughly 6,800 people had been watching the show."
16. Sigmund sees a young man carrying a long pole and stops to ask him why he has it. The man replies: "It's a balancing pole and I use it in my act. My skill is funambulism, which you may know as..." How does the man finish his sentence?

Answer: Tightrope walking

Sigmund: "Ah yes! In 1974 I briefly studied tightrope walking when I was trying to solve the Case of the Brave and Balanced Bandit. The suspect had escaped by crossing a highwire between the two towers of New York's World Trade Centre which had been put in place for Philippe Petit to use in a stunt. On August 7, 1974, Petit crossed back and forth between the towers eight times.

He used a balance pole which was 7.9m long. Of course, I'm sure you know that tightrope walkers use these poles to lower their centre of gravity so as to reduce the risk of falling."
17. Sigmund sees two acrobats using their legs to propel two other performers into the air, and is impressed to see the artists easily meeting feet to feet after the aerobatic tumbles are complete. Sigmund asks them about their act. He is told: "Our act is sometimes called human juggling, but its correct name derives from a character in Greek mythology who flew too close to the sun. His name was ..."

Answer: Icarus

Sigmund: "I first encountered this art when I was solving the case of the Terrifying but Truthful Tumblers. Icarian games are an ancient circus discipline that are traditionally performed by members of the same family. The performers at the base catapult and then catch the other acrobats who complete impressive aerial manoeuvres.

This art was so named because the aerial tumbling evokes the image of human flight as epitomised by Icarus. According to Greek mythology, Daedalus and his son Icarus used wax wings to escape their enemy, but Icarus disobeyed his father, flew too close to the sun, and was killed because his wings melted."
18. A man applying makeup calls Sigmund over and tells him: "Possibly no performers remind people of the circus more than those who practice my art, though popular culture sometimes portrays us in a negative light. Examples include Krusty from 'The Simpsons', Stephen King's Pennywise and Batman's arch enemy The Joker. I am a ..."

Answer: Clown

Sigmund: "I see you, like many circus clowns, are from the whiteface school. I love clowns. In the 1950s, when I was a young sleuth solving the Case of the Maniacal Michigan Motor Mechanic, I saw the actual car used by the Cole Brothers Circus' clowns when they performed their pioneer gag, the clown car, in which a large number of clowns emerged from a ridiculously small vehicle."
19. Overhead, Sigmund sees a woman sitting in something that looks like a hula hoop. "What's your act called?" he shouts up to her. What does she answer?

Answer: Aerial hoop

Sigmund: "Aerial hoop you say? When I was investigating the Case of the Hanover Hula Hoop Heist I questioned some aerial hoopers, but they called their art Circeaux or Lyra. I watched them perform a fantastic combination of swinging and static moves. I see you are set up to do the same."
20. Sigmund sees a man wearing a safari suit, who is carrying a whip and a chair. As the man heads towards the animal cages Sigmund calls out: "Sir! What is your act?" What answer does the man provide?

Answer: Lion Tamer

Sigmund: "My goodness, I thought I'd seen the last of the 'whip and chair' lion tamers when I was investigating the Case of the Lethal Leopard Larceny. That lion tamer actually spent more time taming leopards and tigers than he did lions. He told me the use of the chair in his act was an homage to Clyde Beatty, who was famous for using a chair in early twentieth century lion-taming performances. Changing attitudes towards the treatment of animals in the circus seems to be detracting from the popularity of this kind of act."
21. Over near the popcorn stand Sigmund hears a man singing a very familiar tune that goes: 'doot-doot doodle-oodel-oot-doot doodet'. "Tell me my good man, by what name do you call that melody?" How does the man reply?

Answer: Thunder and Blazes

Sigmund: "Ah, but of course! When I solved the Case of the Callous Classical Composer I met a man who told me that Canadian composer Louis-Phillipe Laurendau arranged Julius Fucik's 'Entrance of the Gladiators' for a small band to play. This gained wide-spread appeal as an entrance theme for circus clowns, and is today usually known as 'Thunder and Blazes'."
22. Sigmund looks inside a tent and sees a woman setting up what looks like an old-fashioned miniature circus. He asks the woman to point out her favourite part of the display and she picks out an ornately painted carriage. "This is how old-time circus folk used to get around," she explains, "it's a circus ..." How does she finish this sentence?

Answer: Wagon

Sigmund: "Well this is a fine example. When I was in Baraboo, Wisconsin, solving the Case of the Mysterious Cackling Crane - Baraboo is the home of the International Crane Foundation you know - I visited the Circus World Museum and saw its impressive display of around fifty antique circus wagons. Baraboo was selected as an appropriate location for the museum because it was the home of the Ringling brothers, and the point from which the first Ringling Brothers Circus tour began."
23. Sigmund sees a young man painting a gold bridle onto a wooden horse that seems to have been impaled on a pole. "That's some horse you have there," Sigmund remarks, "Tell me, what do you do in this circus?" What does the man reply?

Answer: "I run the carousel."

Sigmund: "The carousel is, in my opinion, one of the finest parts of the circus, particularly when it features horses. When I was investigating the Case of the Synthetic Spanish Sea Monster, I discovered that European carousels often feature mythological creatures as well as animals such as pigs, zebras and deer. My friends in Britain sometimes call this attraction a roundabout, and some people call them merry-go-rounds."
24. Sigmund is passing the circus band and he stops to ask them to name their favourite song. The tuba player replies: "Well, let's see. I like the one about an elephant who 'packed her trunk and said goodbye to the circus'. It's got a ripping tuba part. The song's called...". How does he finish this statement?

Answer: Nellie the Elephant

Sigmund: "What a song! Of course I'm sure you know that the original version was recorded by child actress Mandy Miller in 1956. Did you know it was produced by George Martin, who later helped make The Beatles famous? In 1984, when I was in England solving the Case of the Lecherous London Lothario, I heard a version of the song performed by The Toy Dolls on the radio."
25. Sigmund looks back over his notes and realises that, once again, his witnesses have revealed a subliminal message that will help him solve the crime. Take the first letter of the correct answers to questions 1-24 of this quiz (in order) to find the clue which has helped Sigmund solve the crime. He realises that one of his four suspects is guilty because their alibi can be disputed. Which knife thrower does he accuse?

Answer: Fluffy

The first letters of the correct answers to questions 1-24 of this quiz spell out the clue: FLUFFY HAS AN IDENTICAL TWIN, and Sigmund realises that the circus performers have been trying to tell him that, while four people who looked like the four knife throwers were seen eating breakfast at the time of the murder, Fluffy had actually asked her twin sister to impersonate her, so that Fluffy could sneak off and kill the Ringmaster.

Fluffy: "It's true! And my sister, Fuzzy, was more than happy to help. You see, our mother was the world-famous Spinning Sarah. Her knife-throwing skills were surpassed by none. That Ringmaster seduced her and then fired her, leaving her to raise two twin daughters on her own. He deserved everything he got."

With Fluffy and Fuzzy heading off in handcuffs, Sigmund congratulates himself on another case competently solved using subliminal sleuthing.
Source: Author looney_tunes

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