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Quiz about O To Finish The Amazing Race
Quiz about O To Finish The Amazing Race

O To Finish The Amazing Race! Trivia Quiz


See if you can match the descriptions with the capital cities that end with the letter "o".

A matching quiz by ponycargirl. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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  9. Alphabetical Capital Cities

Author
ponycargirl
Time
3 mins
Type
Match Quiz
Quiz #
394,554
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
622
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: turaguy (5/10), Bourman (10/10), Guest 44 (10/10).
(a) Drag-and-drop from the right to the left, or (b) click on a right side answer box and then on a left side box to move it.
QuestionsChoices
1. Founded in 968 AD and originally called al-Manṣuriyyah  
  Paramaribo
2. Once named Christiania and moved locations in the 17th century  
  Porto-Novo
3. Second-highest national capital in the world at 9,350 feet above sea level  
  Cairo
4. Largest city of the Dominican Republic founded by Bartholomew Columbus in 1496   
  Santo Domingo
5. Located on the Niger River, capital of a landlocked country forms its own "cercle" and district  
  Tokyo
6. Name roughly translates to "east capital"  
  Santiago
7. Founded as Lourenšo Marques, southeast African city became capital after its 1975 independence  
  Quito
8. City named after Saint James and located on the Mapocho River  
  Oslo
9. Namesake of tribe that lives nearby, means "large river" and "inhabitants"  
  Bamako
10. City on the Gulf of Guinea used to support the African slave trade  
  Maputo





Select each answer

1. Founded in 968 AD and originally called al-Manṣuriyyah
2. Once named Christiania and moved locations in the 17th century
3. Second-highest national capital in the world at 9,350 feet above sea level
4. Largest city of the Dominican Republic founded by Bartholomew Columbus in 1496
5. Located on the Niger River, capital of a landlocked country forms its own "cercle" and district
6. Name roughly translates to "east capital"
7. Founded as Lourenšo Marques, southeast African city became capital after its 1975 independence
8. City named after Saint James and located on the Mapocho River
9. Namesake of tribe that lives nearby, means "large river" and "inhabitants"
10. City on the Gulf of Guinea used to support the African slave trade

Most Recent Scores
May 19 2024 : turaguy: 5/10
Apr 14 2024 : Bourman: 10/10
Apr 13 2024 : Guest 44: 10/10
Apr 09 2024 : Guest 12: 8/10
Apr 06 2024 : Guest 45: 6/10

Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Founded in 968 AD and originally called al-Manṣuriyyah

Answer: Cairo

This may be rather surprising given the fact that the ancient Egyptians were obviously living in the area for thousands of years before the city was actually founded. Originally known as al-Manṣūriyyah, the site of modern day Cairo was chosen to be the new capital of the Fatimid Caliphate.

It took about two hundred years, however, for the capital to finally be permanently moved from Fustat to Cairo. Cairo, Egypt, is one of the largest cities in Africa and the Middle East today.
2. Once named Christiania and moved locations in the 17th century

Answer: Oslo

Oslo, Norway, was originally founded in the 1040s by Harald Hardrada. In 1624, however, the city burned down after a devastating fire destroyed the mostly wooden city. Oslo was then relocated to be closer to Akershus Castle. After the move, the city was renamed Christiania and then Kristiania before eventually being called Oslo again in 1925.
3. Second-highest national capital in the world at 9,350 feet above sea level

Answer: Quito

Quito, Ecuador, was founded high up in the Andes Mountains in 1534 by Diego de Almagro, a Spanish conquistador. It is the second highest world capital after the nearby La Paz, Bolivia. Quito is the capital city closest to the equator, lying just under a mile south of the imaginary line.
4. Largest city of the Dominican Republic founded by Bartholomew Columbus in 1496

Answer: Santo Domingo

Christopher's younger brother established the city of Santo Domingo (named after Saint Dominic) on the east bank of the Ozama River; the settlement was later moved to the west bank. Its location at the river mouth made it an important commercial center from its earliest days.

Not only is it the oldest settlement in the Americas that has been continuously inhabited by Europeans, it is also the site of the first university and the first cathedral in the New World. The capture of the city by Francis Drake in 1586 is considered to mark the beginning of the end of Spanish dominance on the island of Hispaniola, which later saw the western half of the island become the French colony that gained independence as Haiti. Santo Domingo is the largest city and capital of the Dominican Republic.
5. Located on the Niger River, capital of a landlocked country forms its own "cercle" and district

Answer: Bamako

Bamako is not only the capital, but also the largest city of Mali, being home to approximately a quarter of the country's population. While the country is landlocked, it has access to shipping via the Niger River. Bamako's port is located in nearby Koulikoro. Mali is administratively subdivided into six regions plus the capital district, and then further into 49 cercles (French for "circle") - the latter designation has survived only in Mali even though it had once been the standard in most French colonies.
6. Name roughly translates to "east capital"

Answer: Tokyo

Tokyo, Japan, was originally called Edo, a name that means "estuary" in Japanese. In 1868, Edo's name was changed to Tokyo, which means "east capital", because Tokyo is located in the eastern part of Japan and Japan is east of the other nations of the Orient. Tokyo consistently ranks at the top of most livable cities lists and is well known for its nightlife, history and technology.
7. Founded as Lourenšo Marques, southeast African city became capital after its 1975 independence

Answer: Maputo

When Mozambique became independent from Portugal in 1975, it was largely expected that the Portuguese name of its capital would be changed to Can Phumo, honoring a great chief of the local area. Instead, FRELIMO, the communist movement that led Mozambique's independence war, chose the name Maputo, after the Maputo River, located significantly further south and marking Mozambique's border with South Africa, which had symbolic value during the independence struggle, along with its northern counterpart, Rovuma.

The two rivers delineate Mozambique's territorial extent and have thus become a symbol of its national sovereignty.
8. City named after Saint James and located on the Mapocho River

Answer: Santiago

In 1540 Pedro de Valdivia settled in the area that was to become Santiago, and established apparently cordial relations with the locals. However, when he went off to battle and left the fledgling city unprotected, they destroyed it, except for the fort, which was successfully defended by the handful of remaining troops.

The city was rebuilt, and grew in size and importance, despite the problems caused by native attacks, floods and earthquakes. When Chile gained independence from Spain (declared in 1818, recognized in 1844), Santiago became its capital.
9. Namesake of tribe that lives nearby, means "large river" and "inhabitants"

Answer: Paramaribo

Paramaribo was not only where the first Dutch settlement was established in 1613, it was also the site of a near by Indian village called Parmirbo. After being abandoned by the Dutch, the city was inhabited by English settlers, although it was eventually taken back by the Dutch during the Second Anglo-Dutch War.

It has remained the capital of Suriname from the time of its original founding, during the time of colonization, and since its independence in 1975.
10. City on the Gulf of Guinea used to support the African slave trade

Answer: Porto-Novo

Also known as Hogbonu (to the indigenous Gun people) and Ajashe (by the indigenous Yoruba people), the city now known as Porto-Novo was taken over (more or less, as native rulers still had considerable influence) in the 16th century by the Portuguese to support the slave trade. Near the end of the 19th century it became part of the colony of French Dahomey, and was designated its capital.

Although it is only the second-largest city in Benin, it is the official capital, and parliament sits there. The largest city, Cotonou, is about 25 miles away, and is where most of the government ministries actually have their offices.
Source: Author ponycargirl

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor spanishliz before going online.
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