Quiz about A History of Fat People
Quiz about A History of Fat People

A History of Fat People Trivia Quiz


Diets have long been part of day to day life, as humankind has long been obsessed with shedding those unwanted pounds. This quiz promises to give you plenty of "food for thought", and will test your knowledge of dieting history.

A multiple-choice quiz by poshprice. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
poshprice
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
356,788
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
2721
Awards
Editor's Choice
Last 3 plays: Guest 161 (5/10), Guest 172 (7/10), Guest 174 (5/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. During the 1920s, with the emergence of the flapper girl, who was, ideally, long, lean and flat chested, full figured women turned to which dangerous and unpalatable parasite to help them lose weight? Hint

Cryptosporidium
Tapeworm
Leishmania
Babesia

2. During the first quarter of the twentieth century, which brand of American cigarettes shamelessly took advantage of the desire of individuals everywhere to lose weight, even going so far as to create an advertising campaign that urged "Reach for a Lucky instead of a sweet"? Hint

Lucky Leprechaun
Camel Luck
Lucky Strike
Luck and Lose

3. Which English Romantic poet, who wrote "She Walks in Beauty", and was rumoured to have had an affair with his half-sister, is considered to be one of the earliest celebrity diet icons? Hint

William Wordsworth
Wilfred Owen
John Keats
Lord Byron

4. Which Victorian diet enthusiast was responsible for a diet that, in his own words, promised to turn "a pitiable glutton into an intelligent epicurean", and thus earned himself the nickname, The Great Masticator? Hint

Charles Dickens
Robert Atkins
William Gladstone
Horace Fletcher

5. During the Middle Ages, gluttony was considered to be a sign of wealth and status.

True
False

6. What supposedly fat-eliminating product, which was first marketed in the 1920s, promised to wipe out one's flabby bits altogether, by promising to shrink "the skin" and thus reduce "any part of the body", without affecting the rest? Hint

La-Mar Reducing Soap
Fab Fit
Flab-to-Go
Flesh Off

7. Is obesity really a modern phenomenon?

Yes
No

8. What term, which was inspired by Mary Shelley's 1818 literary masterpiece, did Weight Watchers' co-founder, Jean Nidetch, use to describe the food obsessions that plagued her and her friends? Hint

Draculites
Frankensteins
Hydes
Medusas

9. Of what nationality was doctor Tobias Venner, who has been credited as the first person to use the word "obese" to describe the extremely overweight? Hint

English
American
German
Swiss

10. During the seventeenth century, which English county, often referred to as England's oldest, became known for its rather odd and unlikely local hero, who once ate an entire sheep in one sitting? Hint

Yorkshire
Kent
Cumberland
Rutland


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. During the 1920s, with the emergence of the flapper girl, who was, ideally, long, lean and flat chested, full figured women turned to which dangerous and unpalatable parasite to help them lose weight?

Answer: Tapeworm

During the 1920s, UK and US women were confronted with a new weight loss solution, which came in the form of sanitized jars of tapeworms. Advertised specifically as a dieting aid, these parasites were hailed as the way forward, with one advertisement going so far as to claim "No diet, no baths, no exercise. Fat- the enemy that is shortening your life - Banished! How? With sanitized tapeworms - jar-packed!" However what was at the time hailed to be the perfect dieting solution was eventually discovered to be extremely harmful to one's health.

Indeed those who did ingest these parasitic little critters soon began to exhibit some very unpleasant and potentially serious symptoms, including weakness, nausea, diarrhoea, fever, cysts and seizures, Needless to say, the tapeworm diet was far more likely to shorten one's life, rather than prolong it.
2. During the first quarter of the twentieth century, which brand of American cigarettes shamelessly took advantage of the desire of individuals everywhere to lose weight, even going so far as to create an advertising campaign that urged "Reach for a Lucky instead of a sweet"?

Answer: Lucky Strike

It was a brand of cigarettes called Lucky Strike which once had an advertising campaign that urged the individual to "reach for a Lucky" whenever they were tempted to eat. Moreover their posters and billboards more than hammered this point home, by depicting a chubby, double-chinned shadow alongside the face of the attractive male and female characters that decorated them.

The campaign also inflamed the sweet industry, and eventually led to claims that the brand was openly targeting children. Nevertheless, during the 1920s, sales of Lucky Strike increased by a whopping 200%.

However once the dangers of smoking began to be realised, (which first occurred around 1930), Lucky Strike's sales began to drop.
3. Which English Romantic poet, who wrote "She Walks in Beauty", and was rumoured to have had an affair with his half-sister, is considered to be one of the earliest celebrity diet icons?

Answer: Lord Byron

During the first half of the nineteenth century, Lord Byron became known not just for his desire to lose weight, but also his drastic, and often dangerous ways of doing so. While at Cambridge University, he half-starved himself by living off a diet of potatoes soaked in vinegar and biscuits and soda water.

Therefore when his followers began to copy him, Byron attracted a good deal of criticism, with many doctors of the day bemoaning the effect he was having on the younger members of society.
4. Which Victorian diet enthusiast was responsible for a diet that, in his own words, promised to turn "a pitiable glutton into an intelligent epicurean", and thus earned himself the nickname, The Great Masticator?

Answer: Horace Fletcher

Horace Fletcher, aka The Great Masticator, was the American diet enthusiast responsible for developing a theory that urged dieters to chew everything until it was reduced to mere liquid. During his lifetime he gained a considerable following, so much so that these individuals were referred to as Fletcherites.

Moreover his followers included the likes of legendary Austrian writer, Franz Kafka, and popular American author, Henry James. His mastication diet eventually became known as Fletcherizing, and helped make him a millionaire, as he went on tour around the United States, promoting Fletcherizing, in addition to several of his other theories.
5. During the Middle Ages, gluttony was considered to be a sign of wealth and status.

Answer: True

During the Middle Ages, for much of Europe, overeating was a sign of status, and the only ones who overindulged regularly were those who could afford it. The diets of the poor included simple fare, which could be sourced locally, and as a result, others turned to what historians claim was an early form of bulimia.

Indeed those who did not wish to copy the obese frames of public figures such as Thomas Aquinas and Henry VIII, relied on what was referred to at the time as Ox-Hunger. Indeed these individuals regularly vomited, in order to uphold their outward show of wealth and status, while also protecting their waistlines.
6. What supposedly fat-eliminating product, which was first marketed in the 1920s, promised to wipe out one's flabby bits altogether, by promising to shrink "the skin" and thus reduce "any part of the body", without affecting the rest?

Answer: La-Mar Reducing Soap

An advertisement for the "magic" La-Mar Reducing Soap appeared in an April, 1925 edition of the "Reading Eagle" newspaper. Claiming to be "a new discovery", it promised to reduce the "superfluous flesh" on any part of the body, but without "affecting other parts".

Moreover it maintained that purchasers would be able to "simply wash" their "fat away", without having to make a change to their routines, or alter their busy lifestyles. Incredibly, the advertisement even offered a money-back guarantee, insisting "You will be surprised at the results".
7. Is obesity really a modern phenomenon?

Answer: No

Contrary to popular belief, obesity was actually an issue in previous centuries, and is not merely a modern phenomenon. This is supported by various archaeological discoveries, which in one instance uncovered carved figurines of humans, which sported large, swollen abdomens. Found to date back to the Stone Age, these carvings took archaeologists by surprise, as their discovery suggested that obesity had actually been around for a lot longer than anyone had previously thought.

Historians also suggested that these obese individuals may well have been revered and were also more likely to survive harsh winters, as they had plenty of meat on their bones.
8. What term, which was inspired by Mary Shelley's 1818 literary masterpiece, did Weight Watchers' co-founder, Jean Nidetch, use to describe the food obsessions that plagued her and her friends?

Answer: Frankensteins

In 1961, Weight Watchers' co-founder, Jean Nidetch, was an overweight housewife, who struggled with food obsessions, and found it especially difficult to resist the lure of cookies. While entertaining a group of friends at her home, Jean revealed this little nugget of information to them. Soon enough, each woman was confessing to their own "Frankensteins" as Jean called them.

The group then agreed to meet at Jean's house on a weekly basis, in order to share each other's stories and support one and other. Every one of the women went on to lose weight as a result, and so the idea behind Weight Watchers was born.
9. Of what nationality was doctor Tobias Venner, who has been credited as the first person to use the word "obese" to describe the extremely overweight?

Answer: English

According to Stephanie Watson's 2008 book, "The Genetics of Obesity", it was English doctor, Tobias Venner, who first used the term "obesity" to "describe people who are very overweight". Born in 1577, in Petherton, Somerset, Venner was a practicing physician, who spent a sizeable portion of his career writing about and treating the ailments of the overweight.

In his book entitled "Treatise", he wrote that in order "to make slender such bodies as are too grosse"(sic), such individuals ought to visit the English city of Bath, in order to bathe in its "healing, warm springs".
10. During the seventeenth century, which English county, often referred to as England's oldest, became known for its rather odd and unlikely local hero, who once ate an entire sheep in one sitting?

Answer: Kent

During the early seventeenth century, a man named Nicholas Wood began to earn himself a reputation as an incredible glutton. Usually referred to as "the great eater of Kent", (as he grew up in the village of Harrietsham), he became known for his "performance" at local country fairs. Using his unique talents to garner an audience for himself, Wood once devoured an enormous breakfast, which consisted of three large pies, a leg of mutton, sixty eggs and a sizeable black pudding.

Incredibly, after clearing out a local inn's larder, Wood claimed to still be hungry, and promptly polished off a duck, which until moments earlier had been quietly swimming in a pond outside the tavern. Seventeenth century poet, John Taylor, was so impressed by Wood's outrageous exploits that he wrote an account of them, once noting that "He hath eaten a whole sheep at one meal", before humorously correcting himself - "pardon me! I think he left the skin, the wool and bones".
Source: Author poshprice

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