Quiz about How to Cook Like Heston Chicken
Quiz about How to Cook Like Heston Chicken

How to Cook Like Heston: Chicken Quiz


Welcome back to the lab! Heston's mad culinary wizardry falls upon the lovely chicken. This series is based on his TV series of the same name, where we challenge traditional techniques and share the secrets of Heston Blumenthal's creations. Let's go!

A multiple-choice quiz by Abby_91. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
Abby_91
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
384,390
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
208
Last 3 plays: Guest 172 (8/10), Guest 71 (4/10), buckeye52 (4/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. The chicken is one of the most eaten meats in the world, and one dish captures the imagination of many, roast chicken. Most people are intimidated by the bird, but let's strip it down to basics. Speaking of stripping down, we have to rid of the bird of its trussing. Which of these is the main reason for not roasting the bird with trussing string? Hint

It can produce ash while cooking.
Trussing can leave areas between the wings and legs uncooked.
It creates mold during cooking.
It can set flame to the bird and overcook it.

2. Now, to roast the chicken, Heston is going to cook it at 90C (194F) for about 90 minutes. Now that sounds crazy, and it will have no roast smells coming out, but it will be an amazing chicken. Which of these is NOT a reason for cooking at such low temperature? Hint

It gives the chicken a nice brown skin.
It keeps the natural flavour of the chicken in.
It prevents ths meat from contracting too much from high temperature, sealing in juices.
The meat becomes tender from the low and slow method.

3. Chicken stock is the bedrock or many dishes. But more often or not, chicken stock doesn't always have strong chicken flavour. Heston wants a stock that tastes like the roast chicken we made earlier. Which of these ingredients doesn't mask the chicken flavour, but enhances it by boosting the browning of the meat? One hint, this contains a lot of protein. Hint

White Wine
Milk Powder
Celery
Apricot

4. Making a chicken stock usually takes hours of simmering, and that is fine. But, Heston wants to extract the chicken flavour even more, and he's using a pretty strong bit of kit to get every ounce of of it in his stock. Which of these would be useful to 'push' that flavour in your stock? Hint

Vacuum Cleaner
Blowtorch
Pressure Cooker
Dry Ice

5. There is another reason for freezing that stock into ice cubes, and we are about to use it to make a fine dining classic, consomme. Making stock as clear as consomme can be labour intensive, but with these stock ice cubes, what is the correct method to turn it into a crystal clear consomme? Hint

Pour the cubes into hot water and add tea leaves.
Add the cubes to a mixture of minced pork, egg whites and vegetables and wait.
Let the cubes melt on a strainer lined with muslin cloth and warm through.
Add the cubes to a pot and pour liquid oxygen into it.

6. Heston's golden consomme looks fantastic, and he plays against traditional techniques. Which of these methods is the traditional way to make consomme? Hint

Dry the stock into powder and add milk.
Blow the impurities away with a bicycle pump.
Let the stock go through two water purifiers.
Purify the stock with a floating cloud made of egg whites, minced meat and vegetables.

7. Let's get hearty. Heston is a man of nostalgia, and he loves a good old chicken pie. If there's one thing is hates, it's a gloopy, sloppy chicken pie with dry meat and little pronounced flavour. So, let's have a go at his mad take on this classic. To begin, we have these chicken thighs. We will simmer it, but which liquid is the best to get tender, juicy and maximum flavour? Hint

Chicken Stock
Mushroom Stock
White Wine
Watermelon Juice

8. Chicken pie needs a sauce, and this sauce requires a little bit of seaweed gelling agent called agar-agar. This stuff will set the sauce into a blob of creamy sauce set as a jelly. But what's so special about it that can help with your chicken pie sauce? Hint

It turns the pie into a dessert.
Its heat resistant, so it doesn't melt when baked.
Its anti-microbial, so it will prevent infectious diseases from entering the pie.
It gives the pie a bright orange colour.

9. Let's finish this pie. The sauce is still a lump of jelly, so what is the best step to turn it to a smooth sauce? Hint

Blow it up with dynamite.
Use a hammer and smash it.
Use a blow torch to melt it.
Blitz with a hand blender.

10. For his final trick, Heston has invited some female hockey team players for a roast chicken lunch. However, he doesn't just want to serve chicken, he wants to serve a scent. This seemingly ordinary garden decoration of lemons and thyme hides his best mate, dry ice.

True or false: pouring hot water with essential oils on dry ice will help spread the scent around via the fog.

True
False


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The chicken is one of the most eaten meats in the world, and one dish captures the imagination of many, roast chicken. Most people are intimidated by the bird, but let's strip it down to basics. Speaking of stripping down, we have to rid of the bird of its trussing. Which of these is the main reason for not roasting the bird with trussing string?

Answer: Trussing can leave areas between the wings and legs uncooked.

Trussing the chicken is usually done for appearances, making it look proper in 'stance'. But there's a side effect, it leaves the bird with an uneven colour and doneness in areas affected by the strings. Areas between the thighs and wings will have a harder time for heat to penetrate through, leaving a bird that is not evenly cooked.

So when you buy a chicken from the supermarket, get rid of those strings and open up the thighs for a perfect roast. For juicy results, leave the chicken in a brine of salt and water and let it soak overnight, about 60g of salt for every one liter of water. Afterwards, dry it up with paper towels, cut the wishbone off to make carving a breeze, stuff with thyme, lemon and smother the skin with softened butter. The keyword is smother, so get a good amount of it.
2. Now, to roast the chicken, Heston is going to cook it at 90C (194F) for about 90 minutes. Now that sounds crazy, and it will have no roast smells coming out, but it will be an amazing chicken. Which of these is NOT a reason for cooking at such low temperature?

Answer: It gives the chicken a nice brown skin.

There's lot of things cooking at low temperature does, but not the browning of skin though. By cooking the bird low and slow, it helps to seal in all the moisture and flavour of the chicken. Heston states that you won't permeate the kitchen with roast smells, and that is a good thing, as smells are lost flavour. To know if your chicken is cooked, use a thermometer on the thickest part of the breast and ensure it reaches between 60-75C (140-167F) for both safety and perfection. Let the bird rest for 45 minutes before you blast the oven up to its highest temperature to roast that skin, but be sure to baste the chicken with a little oil to crisp it. Here's a top tip, when you carve out the breast to serve, slice it across the grain. This will make the meat fall apart and feel more tender.

Now, to prove his point of roasting gently, Heston roasted another chicken, one that is given the typical recipe of 180C for 90 minutes, and it is shocking. The meat of this chicken is dry and chalky, like building material. With high temperatures, the flesh of the bird contracts and lose all its moisture. Heston's chicken is glistening with juice, the skin is beautifully caramelized and the meat falls apart at the touch. You will never see roast chicken the same ever again.
3. Chicken stock is the bedrock or many dishes. But more often or not, chicken stock doesn't always have strong chicken flavour. Heston wants a stock that tastes like the roast chicken we made earlier. Which of these ingredients doesn't mask the chicken flavour, but enhances it by boosting the browning of the meat? One hint, this contains a lot of protein.

Answer: Milk Powder

It may sound insane, but think of milk powder as protein and sugar. By mixing milk powder with chicken wings and browning it in the oven before making your stock, it enhances the browning of meat. This is the Maillard Reaction, where proteins brown under heat, creating roast flavours. The powder is like adding propane to a flame, super boosting the roast flavour. Be sure to use chicken wings with their wing tips on, as the fat of the tips can help make for a fantastic stock. After roasting in an oven at 200C (392F) till golden, remove the wings and pour hot water in the tray and scrape the brown bits left by the chicken.

Before cooking that stock, Heston meets with a women's hockey team for a blindfold stock tasting. Three ladies and their chicken stocks go under the gun of Heston's tastebuds. They each taste alright, and Heston can pick up the ingredients that flavour the stocks, and their flaws.

The ladies used ingredients like celery and even a vegetable stock cube to bulk up the chicken flavour. Certain ingredients like celery, white wine and stock cubes tend to mask chicken flavour, as they are stronger in intensity, and a chicken carcass alone has little flavour to provide on its own, so the addition of chicken wings roasted with milk powder goes a long way to getting a better quality stock.
4. Making a chicken stock usually takes hours of simmering, and that is fine. But, Heston wants to extract the chicken flavour even more, and he's using a pretty strong bit of kit to get every ounce of of it in his stock. Which of these would be useful to 'push' that flavour in your stock?

Answer: Pressure Cooker

Using a pressure cooker to make a stock is a great way to boost it even further. Conventional methods of making stock can allow aromas to escape through steam, and stocks usually have to be left open so you can remove the scum that builds up at the top. With the pressure cooker though, it keeps them sealed in tight. Remember, just like the roast chicken, lost smells equals lost flavours.

Have your pressure cooker be filled with the pan juices, sauteed carrots, onions and brown mushrooms, those roasted chicken wings and a chicken carcass and let the pressure build. After two hours of cooking and another 30 minutes of cooling, strain the stock with muslin cloth. This chicken stock will come out a beautiful rich golden brown colour, and if you want to keep it for longer, freeze it in cubes and take a frozen stock cube for a flavour enhancement in any dish. No need for those stock substitutes from supermarkets.
5. There is another reason for freezing that stock into ice cubes, and we are about to use it to make a fine dining classic, consomme. Making stock as clear as consomme can be labour intensive, but with these stock ice cubes, what is the correct method to turn it into a crystal clear consomme?

Answer: Let the cubes melt on a strainer lined with muslin cloth and warm through.

No need for any massive lab equipment, just grab the frozen stock cubes and let them melt on a strainer with muslin cloth. The muslin will trap any impurities and fat as the stock cubes melt, and with patience, drip by drip, you'll have a bowl of pure golden consomme.

Then warm it through in a pot on a gentle simmer and add a jasmine flower for an added enhancement. Who needs to go to a fancy restaurant for consomme?
6. Heston's golden consomme looks fantastic, and he plays against traditional techniques. Which of these methods is the traditional way to make consomme?

Answer: Purify the stock with a floating cloud made of egg whites, minced meat and vegetables.

A traditional consomme is made over a stove top. With the stock, you add a mix of egg whites, minced meat such as chicken or pork, and diced mirepoix which is a mix of carrots, onions and celery. This mix forms a type of 'cloud' that floats to the top of the stock, trapping the fat and impurities.

This will simmer until the stock is clear, and the cloud is promptly thrown away. This method is tricky to master, so using this ice cube trick will take the hassle off making Michelin star quality consomme.
7. Let's get hearty. Heston is a man of nostalgia, and he loves a good old chicken pie. If there's one thing is hates, it's a gloopy, sloppy chicken pie with dry meat and little pronounced flavour. So, let's have a go at his mad take on this classic. To begin, we have these chicken thighs. We will simmer it, but which liquid is the best to get tender, juicy and maximum flavour?

Answer: Chicken Stock

Take your chicken thighs and remove the skin before brining overnight. After brining, wash and dry the thighs and add it to a pot of chicken stock and simmer. Once it reaches simmer, cover it with a lid or tin foil and pop it in an 85C (185F) oven for 90 minutes. You will get juicy meat for that pie, but patience is what you need, my friend.

Now don't discard that skin, render the skin on a pan and use the fat to saute some chopped leeks. Now let's have some fun.
8. Chicken pie needs a sauce, and this sauce requires a little bit of seaweed gelling agent called agar-agar. This stuff will set the sauce into a blob of creamy sauce set as a jelly. But what's so special about it that can help with your chicken pie sauce?

Answer: Its heat resistant, so it doesn't melt when baked.

Heston even grabs a blow torch to demonstrate how heat resistant it is! What agar-agar does to the sauce is that it resists heat. It means that when it bakes in the oven with the rest of the ingredients, the sauce stays thick and creamy, unlike regular pies that get somewhat watery, due to splitting fat in the cream. Using heavy amounts of flour in sauces can thicken it, but it will mask flavours, so agar-agar helps thicken the sauce without masking.

This sauce blob is made with reduced white wine, cream, milk and some of that lovely chicken stock. Once simmered, add in the agar-agar till it reaches 90C (194F). Let the mix set in the fridge, and you get this white cream jelly.
9. Let's finish this pie. The sauce is still a lump of jelly, so what is the best step to turn it to a smooth sauce?

Answer: Blitz with a hand blender.

Grab a hand blender and blitz it. It turns that jelly lump into a luscious liquid sauce that won't melt in the pie. Get your chicken and chop into cubes, mix it with cooked and shredded ham hock, the leeks cooked earlier in chicken fat, chopped button mushrooms, wholegrain Dijon mustard, chopped parsley and that creamy sauce. Once mixed, add it to a tray and line with puff pastry, ensure to egg wash it before baking. Bake it in the oven at 215C (419F) for 15 minutes. Crispy puff pastry, tender juicy chicken and a sauce that compliments flavours, not overpower it. This pie is what dreams are made of, well, if you dream of pies every night that is.

If you don't want to use agar-agar or can't find it in your supermarket, you can thicken the sauce with a little corn flour for a similar result. Also, you can use that pie filling for amazing picnic sandwiches, on top of pasta or whatever you fancy, its just that good.
10. For his final trick, Heston has invited some female hockey team players for a roast chicken lunch. However, he doesn't just want to serve chicken, he wants to serve a scent. This seemingly ordinary garden decoration of lemons and thyme hides his best mate, dry ice. True or false: pouring hot water with essential oils on dry ice will help spread the scent around via the fog.

Answer: True

With a small garden stand or a pot, have some fresh thyme and lemons in a decorative stance. Hide the dry ice within and have some hot water with lemon and thyme scented essential oils. All Heston has to do, is water his lemons, and a cascading cloud of citrus and herb essence fills the table. This scent will enhance the roast chicken that was roasted with lemon and thyme. The scent will make food even tastier, and the table will look absolutely mystical. What a spectacular display.

To demonstrate the importance of scent and taste, Heston has the hockey ladies sip some wine with their noses plugged. With no sense of smell, the wine gives little to no taste. Once the plugs were removed and they take another sip, the difference is dramatic. What we taste is what we smell, and serving scent with the chicken will further enhance the taste and experience of dinner. Besides, who doesn't love a bit of dry ice?
Source: Author Abby_91

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor WesleyCrusher before going online.
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