FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about Please Sir  I Want Some More  British Foods
Quiz about Please Sir  I Want Some More  British Foods

Please Sir! I Want Some More - British Foods Quiz


As my first British food quiz; 'Scoff, Scran & Mongee' went down so well, I thought I'd treat you to an extra helping... Tuck in and enjoy!

A multiple-choice quiz by SisterSeagull. Estimated time: 5 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. Hobbies Trivia
  6. »
  7. International Cuisine
  8. »
  9. British Foods

Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
356,902
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
868
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Question 1 of 10
1. The origins of this food item can be found in the northern counties of England during the Elizabethan period. They take their name from the effect that they will have on you if you eat too many. By what name are they known? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. These popular cheeses hail from the English county of Somerset and take their name from the town near Yeovil in which they were first made. Which town is this? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. These small pies have been popular in Scotland for many generations and have also become popular with the 'Sassenachs'. The traditional meaty filling is mutton. By what name are these delicious little pies commonly known? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. 'Podin Henlys' is a sweet pudding prepared and served to the dancers and spectators at the 'Furry Day' celebrations in which Cornish town each May? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Used as a spice for over 5000 years, this ingredient is usually encountered in seed form and has a mild calming effect. For this reason it was often used in food served at funeral wakes; 'Wiggs' and 'Yorkshire Funeral Biscuits' are two such foods. What are these seeds that, with cumin, are also used to flavour the spirit, 'Kümmel'? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. If you were living in the United Kingdom whilst the 'horsemeat in food' scandal was in full swing, you may have been excused if you hadn't been to keen on eating this meat pie that hails from a town prominent within the UK horse racing industry. From which Berkshire town does this dish take its name? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. This dish, now regarded as typically British, was brought back to Britain by soldiers returning home from service in the Indian sub-continent. What is the name of this popular and delicious 'fishy' dish? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Over the last few decades, fruits such as melon, kiwi, blackcurrants and cherries have become popular ingredients in recipes for this fabulous dessert that takes its name from a famous British public school? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Becoming popular around four hundred years ago, this dessert is prepared using milk, cream, sugar and wine. This smooth and tasty dessert is traditionally served chilled in fine glasses. Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. If you have answered the preceding questions correctly, each initial letter will spell the answer to this question...These are small, breadcrumb covered patties usually found on the hotplate at the local fish and chip shop. What are these tasty little morsels known as?

Answer: (Two Words (4, 5))

(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The origins of this food item can be found in the northern counties of England during the Elizabethan period. They take their name from the effect that they will have on you if you eat too many. By what name are they known?

Answer: Fat Rascals

Originating in Yorkshire, 'Fat Rascals' are a cross between a scone and another type of sweet cake known as a 'Rock Cake'. Ideally a fat rascal should be served warm, split and spread thickly with butter and a fruit preserve. Larger than either a scone or a rock cake, fat rascals will certainly put a strain on your waistbands, should you overindulge!
2. These popular cheeses hail from the English county of Somerset and take their name from the town near Yeovil in which they were first made. Which town is this?

Answer: Ilchester

The Ilchester Cheese Company was founded in 1962 by a local hotelier, making the company a relative new-comer to the cheese world. Although they do not manufacture cheese themselves, the Ilchester Company was the very first in Britain that marketed cheeses blended with other ingredients such as ales and fruits of various kinds. One of their most popular products is a slightly softer form of cheddar cheese that has been flavoured using smoke from burning apple wood and named, unsurprisingly, Applewood Smoked Cheddar!
3. These small pies have been popular in Scotland for many generations and have also become popular with the 'Sassenachs'. The traditional meaty filling is mutton. By what name are these delicious little pies commonly known?

Answer: Scotch Pies

These small double-crust pies are usually four inches in diameter, only an inch and a half high and stuffed tightly with minced mutton and onions before being baked. Any fat contained in the mutton bubbles out through the pie crust which helps keep these tasty little pies nice and moist.

There is nothing quite like biting into a hot scotch pie and letting the fat dribble down your chin! Served with 'buster' peas, a form of mushy peas smothered with vinegar, they are also known north of the border as 'savoury pies' or 'mince pies'.

A word of warning however; an over-indulgence of 'buster' peas will lead to quite serious flatulence!
4. 'Podin Henlys' is a sweet pudding prepared and served to the dancers and spectators at the 'Furry Day' celebrations in which Cornish town each May?

Answer: Helston

This is a lightly textured fruity pudding made principally from suet and having the unusual, added ingredient of ground rice flour. Also containing raisins, currants, sultanas, apricots and nutmeg, Helston pudding is traditionally served on 'Furry Day' ('furry', rhyming with 'hurry') when the world famous 'Floral Dance' takes place each year on the 8th of May, the feast day for Saint Michael; 'Furry Day' is one of the oldest celebrations still practiced in Britain and is believed to welcome the arrival of Spring.
5. Used as a spice for over 5000 years, this ingredient is usually encountered in seed form and has a mild calming effect. For this reason it was often used in food served at funeral wakes; 'Wiggs' and 'Yorkshire Funeral Biscuits' are two such foods. What are these seeds that, with cumin, are also used to flavour the spirit, 'Kümmel'?

Answer: Caraway Seed

Caraway seems to have been very popular in the areas of Britain in which mining was the primary industry, such as Yorkshire and South Wales. A popular cake in both these areas is known simply as 'seed cake' which consists of a simple sponge cake containing caraway seeds. Personally, I think that the flavour of caraway is an acquired taste; one of which I've found impossible to acquire!
6. If you were living in the United Kingdom whilst the 'horsemeat in food' scandal was in full swing, you may have been excused if you hadn't been to keen on eating this meat pie that hails from a town prominent within the UK horse racing industry. From which Berkshire town does this dish take its name?

Answer: Ascot

Ascot Pie, a variation of the traditional British pork pie, is made with veal and ham in a hot water crust that is baked in a long tin in a similar manner to a loaf of bread. Ascot Pie bears a similarity to another traditional British long pie known as 'Gala Pie', an elongated pork pie that has boiled egg running through its centre.
7. This dish, now regarded as typically British, was brought back to Britain by soldiers returning home from service in the Indian sub-continent. What is the name of this popular and delicious 'fishy' dish?

Answer: Kedgeree

Kedgeree is a dish from India that has become associated with the British since the days of the Raj. Consisting, in the main, of Basmati rice and smoked fish, Kedgeree also contains as ingredients peas, eggs and cream and is sometimes heavily spiced. It was traditionally a dish served at breakfast and could often be found in huge bowls in stately homes but has gained popularity as a meal eaten at any time of the day.

It is also rumoured to be one of favourite breakfast meals of HM Queen Elizabeth.
8. Over the last few decades, fruits such as melon, kiwi, blackcurrants and cherries have become popular ingredients in recipes for this fabulous dessert that takes its name from a famous British public school?

Answer: Eton Mess

A lovely, sticky, sweet dessert made from meringues, cream and fresh berry fruits, traditionally served at Eton College on the 4th of June in celebration of their annual cricket match against Harrow School. It is said to have taken its name from an incident in which a Labrador dog sat on a picnic basket in the back of a car, crushing the basket, resulting in broken meringues mixing with crushed strawberries, the traditional fruit used for Eton Mess.
9. Becoming popular around four hundred years ago, this dessert is prepared using milk, cream, sugar and wine. This smooth and tasty dessert is traditionally served chilled in fine glasses.

Answer: Syllabub

A syllabub is, in many ways, very similar to another dessert known as a 'posset', but unlike syllabub, possets were served hot. It is believed that the first recipes for syllabub appeared during the 16th century and they remained popular until the 19th century.

A very popular form of the dessert was a whipped cream-like syllabub floating in a glass of sweet dessert wine. Syllabub finally began to wane in popularity during the 18th century at the time when ice-cream became more readily available.
10. If you have answered the preceding questions correctly, each initial letter will spell the answer to this question...These are small, breadcrumb covered patties usually found on the hotplate at the local fish and chip shop. What are these tasty little morsels known as?

Answer: Fish Cakes

Fish cakes are small patties of fish of various kinds, often salmon, tuna and cod, are mixed with potato, then coated in breadcrumbs and deep fried until golden and absolutely delicious! Served with chips, or French fries, and mushy peas, these cakes have been a chip shop staple here in Britain for decades.
Source: Author SisterSeagull

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor WesleyCrusher before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
6/22/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us