Quiz about Waste Knot Want Knot
Quiz about Waste Knot Want Knot

Waste Knot, Want Knot Trivia Quiz


Many of us have been there; you spend hours waiting for that bite from your lifetime's best fish and then... disaster! You lose it because of a poorly tied knot. This author challenge quiz looks at a number of the most popular knots used by anglers.

A photo quiz by SisterSeagull. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Time
3 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
385,847
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
278
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 68 (6/10), Dunkafly (8/10), Guest 65 (9/10).
photo quiz
1. It is an axiom that any chain is only as strong as its weakest link. Approximately what percentage of a fishing line's test strength can the fisherman expect to lose by inserting a knot? Hint

Around 25%
Around 33%
Around 50%
None if tied correctly

photo quiz
2. All fishing knots must be drawn extremely tightly to be effective. Most anglers use water or saliva to lubricate the knots as they tighten them but which of the following is the best lubricant? Hint

WD40
Superglue
Engine oil
Cooking oil

photo quiz
3. Which of the following is the most appropriate knot for joining two lines of very similar or the same diameters? Hint

Gordian knot
Perfection loop
Canute knot
Blood knot

photo quiz
4. The arbor knot, also known as the Canadian jam knot, is used to attach the backing or main line to which important component of the fisherman's tackle set-up? Hint

Swivel
Bail arm
Spool
Shock leader

photo quiz
5. Which of the following knots is often used to connect the main running line to the shock leader? Hint

Eisenhower
Albright
Kennedy
Reagan

photo quiz
6. This is a knot tied into the line and perfectly suited for attaching terminal tackle items such as paternosters. This knot is called a ____ loop. Hint

Dropper
Induction
Hanging
Fruit

photo quiz
7. The Duncan knot is also known by another name which alludes to the fact that it can be used in the place of virtually any other knot? Hint

Unlimited
Ubiquitous
Universal
Ultimate

photo quiz
8. When tied correctly, which very attractive looking knot proves ideal for joining two lines of differing diameters such as running line to shock leader? Hint

Running man
Sealed knot
Greedy sister
Slim beauty

photo quiz
9. This knot, popular with tuna fisherman from a far western US state, is recommended for use with speciality fluorocarbon lines? Hint

Forward loop or Pittsburgh jello
Pennel hitch or Tallahassee treacle
Sliding barrel or St Louis spread
Reverse clinch or San Diego jam

photo quiz
10. Developed in the southern hemisphere, which of the following possesses great strength and is considered to be one of the most reliable of the higher breaking strain knots? Hint

Bahamian Blood knot
Latvian loop
Australian braid
Canadian clinch


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. It is an axiom that any chain is only as strong as its weakest link. Approximately what percentage of a fishing line's test strength can the fisherman expect to lose by inserting a knot?

Answer: Around 50%

Factor into the equation that inserting a knot will reduce a line's strength by around 50%, it is not difficult to see why sea fishermen use lines with breaking strains at over 100lbs test. Surprisingly, and in addition to this, even after as little as an hour in the water the breaking strength of monofilament fishing lines can be further reduced by as much as 15%. Specimen hunters, game and coarse fishermen have no need for such line as their quarries are so much smaller (generally!) with many using lines averaging at around 8-10lbs test. Personally, I rarely use line over 6lbs test in freshwater and 35lbs test in seawater.

The secret behind reducing the possibility of losing a great fish is to tie effective knots. Achieve this by taking your time, always remembering to lubricate before drawing tight, drawing deliberately and trimming as tidily and as closely to the knot as possible.
2. All fishing knots must be drawn extremely tightly to be effective. Most anglers use water or saliva to lubricate the knots as they tighten them but which of the following is the best lubricant?

Answer: Cooking oil

Most anglers will use either their own saliva or water to aid in drawing the knot together, but cooking oil is the best alternative to these. Both WD40 and engine oil would, in all likelihood, prove useless; they may help draw the knot as tightly as possible but would also stand a very high chance of tainting the line making it less attractive to the quarry.

Although superglue would be useless used as a lubricant, it is an excellent way to protect a knot once tied. Personally, I always coat the knot that secures my running line to the shock leader with a small quantity of superglue.
3. Which of the following is the most appropriate knot for joining two lines of very similar or the same diameters?

Answer: Blood knot

Also known as the barrel knot due to its similarity to the barrel once tied, the simple blood knot is used to join two lines of similar or the same diameter. To tie this knot, overlap the two lines to be joined. Wrap one end around the other line about six times. Tuck the end back between the lines. Repeat the process with the other line, tucking the end back between the lines in the opposite direction. Tighten and trim any excess line as close to the knot itself as possible.

The Blood Knot is a favourite with fly fishermen.

It is primarily used to join two lines of similar size, such as sections of leader or tippet, and is one of the best knots for this purpose. The strength of the knot is dependent on the number of turns each side of the centre; at least five is good but seven is better.

The finished knot should be symmetrical about the centre.
4. The arbor knot, also known as the Canadian jam knot, is used to attach the backing or main line to which important component of the fisherman's tackle set-up?

Answer: Spool

The arbor knot is a secure knot used to attach the line or the backing to the spool on the fishing reel. To tie this knot, pass the fishing line round the spool. Take the free end and tie an overhand knot around the line. Tie a second overhand knot in the free end to act as a stop, then finally, slide both knots down tight against the spool.

When the spool is accessible, the easiest way to tie this knot is to create a noose, simply drop it around the spool and pull it to tighten it. The second overhand knot at the tag end of the line is tied close beside the first and is essential; as the knot is tightened it snugs down tight against the spool and prevents any slippage.

Some anglers improve their knots by winding the loop around the spool two, sometimes three times, before tying their first knot which increases the friction.

The direction of these turns is important as rotating the reel will tighten the loops.
5. Which of the following knots is often used to connect the main running line to the shock leader?

Answer: Albright

The Albright knot has a wide range of uses. It is not the easiest to tie but is suitable for joining different types of fishing line to each other such as braided dacron lines to monofilament or heavy duty wire lines. It is often used to join fly line to its backing, but can be used wherever the wish is to join two fishing lines together. To tie an Albright knot, form a loop in one line. Pass the end of the other through the loop and wrap it neatly around itself and the loop approximately ten times.

Then pass the end back through the loop next to itself. The knot should then be lubricated, pulled tight and trimmed.
6. This is a knot tied into the line and perfectly suited for attaching terminal tackle items such as paternosters. This knot is called a ____ loop.

Answer: Dropper

Also known as the blood dropper knot, the dropper loop creates a loop at right angles to a length of line. It can be used to provide additional attachment points for flies or can be made long enough to tie hooks directly to it but in order to reduce any risk of fouling the loop should not be excessively long. To tie a dropper loop knot, create a large loop in the middle of a line. Holding the loop in the centre, wrap the loop around this crossover point about six times. Open a hole and pass the loop through this hole. Lubricate the line, hold the loop in your teeth, and pull then slowly pull the knot tight. The knot should then appear almost symmetrical on either side of the loop.
7. The Duncan knot is also known by another name which alludes to the fact that it can be used in the place of virtually any other knot?

Answer: Universal

In order to tie the Duncan or universal knot, pass the end of the line through the eye of the item that you wish to attach. Form a loop alongside the running line and, working inside the loop, wrap the end around both lines five times. Lubricate, tighten so the loop spirals, and slide the knot to the desired loop size. With the loop on a post pull on the tag end and less hard on the standing line. Trim the end.

The Duncan knot, originally named after Norman Duncan, its inventor, is also known as a grinner knot in Europe and, like the arbor knot, has a similar appearance to a noose although the two differ internally.

When used to join two lines it is known as a double grinner or a double universal knot. This knot works well with braided and monofilament lines, and is fairly easy to tie even in the dark. Retaining a high proportion of line strength, tests have shown that the knot maintains up to 82% of line strength when used to attach terminal tackle items and up to around 75% of line strength when used to connect lines together.
8. When tied correctly, which very attractive looking knot proves ideal for joining two lines of differing diameters such as running line to shock leader?

Answer: Slim beauty

The slim beauty is an excellent knot for joining different diameters and materials. It is strong and easy to tie and many anglers use it as an alternative to a bimini twist. The slim beauty was developed by a fishing guide in the USA during the 1970's and it is claimed to be one of the very few knots that retains close to 100% of the line's breaking strain. Tie a double overhand knot in the tippet and tighten it form two loops. Pass a bight of the main line through the two loops. Wrap the bight four turns around the tippet and then another four turns outside the first four turns. Tuck the bight under itself. Lubricate, pull tight, and trim the ends.

The recommended number of turns used for the slim beauty varies from as few as three turns outwards and two turns coming back in with some using up to about ten turns in each direction.

The slim beauty is a versatile knot which is relatively easy to learn and remember. It is also compact and importantly, is straight when completed.
9. This knot, popular with tuna fisherman from a far western US state, is recommended for use with speciality fluorocarbon lines?

Answer: Reverse clinch or San Diego jam

The reverse clinch knot, also known as the San Diego jam knot, the Heiliger knot and the half-blood knot, is easy to tie and is suitable for all types of line; monofilament, braided, and fluorocarbon. Pass the tag end through the eye. Hold the lines to keep a loop and wrap the tag end around the line and the tag end several times. Pass the end between the lines near the eye and then back through the loop parallel to the line. Lubricate, tighten carefully so that the turns don't overlap each other, and trim the end.

The number of turns should be decreased with size, ranging from about 7 to 8 turns for 10lb line down to 3 turns for 40lb line. When tightening the knot, ensure that the turns form a neat spiral and don't overlap each other.
10. Developed in the southern hemisphere, which of the following possesses great strength and is considered to be one of the most reliable of the higher breaking strain knots?

Answer: Australian braid

Along with the bimini twist, the Australian braid is one of a few knots that retain the majority of the line's breaking strain with both knots approaching 100% of the line's strength. To tie an Australian braid knot, form a loop maintaining a long tag end. Braid the loop and tag end tightly together, completing the braid using a bight in the tag end. Pull the original loop through the bight. Lubricate and tighten by pulling smoothly on the tag end and trim.

The Australian plait as it is also known, transfers the strain gradually over a considerable length and is claimed to be easier to learn, quicker to tie and has the smallest diameter.

Although this knot claims to preserve most of the line's breaking strain, any sudden jerk may generate enough heat through friction to cause the line to fail, especially when tied using the fine lower breaking strain monofilament lines.
Source: Author SisterSeagull

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor WesleyCrusher before going online.
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Most Recent Scores
Jan 18 2023 : Guest 68: 6/10
Jan 07 2023 : Dunkafly: 8/10
Dec 14 2022 : Guest 65: 9/10

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