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Quiz about Catalogue of Classics
Quiz about Catalogue of Classics

Catalogue of Classics Trivia Quiz


Come join me on an alphabetical journey through the myths of Ancient Greece and Rome!

A multiple-choice quiz by kaddarsgirl. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
kaddarsgirl
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
394,172
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
518
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
-
Question 1 of 10
1. One of the greatest tales of classical mythology is the story of the Trojan War, a ten-year war between the Trojans, led by their mighty champion, Hector, and the Greeks, led by which ruthless man who sacrificed his own daughter to sail to Troy? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Many modern-day languages use words that have origins in Greek and Roman mythology. The name of which Roman goddess of agriculture, mother of Proserpina and counterpart to the Greek Demeter, was the inspiration for a term used to describe a breakfast food commonly made of grain and eaten with milk? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. A number of historical cities in Greece are believed in mythology to have been the home of an oracle. What popular tourist site in Greece claims to have once been home to the Pythia, oracle of Apollo? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Religions both modern and historical have stories about what happens after one leaves the land of the living, and many tell of different places where the souls of the good and the souls of the wicked go to rest (or not) for eternity. Where, in the underworld of Greek mythology, could souls go to spend their afterlife in the fields of paradise? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Monsters often appear in the ancient tales of Greek and Roman heroes who fought them on their way to fame and glory. The hero Perseus once crossed paths with a particularly nasty monster, whose head was crowned with snakes and whose eyes could turn anyone instantly to stone. Medusa, the only mortal monster who possessed the power to turn humans into stone, was one of three sisters collectively known as what? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Quite a few sun-gods appear throughout Greek and Roman mythology, often with responsibilities and myths that overlap one another. The earliest of the Greek sun gods to appear was a Titan, the son of Gaea (earth) and Uranus/Ouranos (sky) and father to Helius/Helios (sun), Eos (dawn), and Selene (moon). What was his name? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Constellations grace the skies every night that have names and stories born out of mythology. One such constellation, Taurus, contains a star cluster named for seven sisters called the Pleiades who were pursued by Orion and his dog, Sirius. Which sister of the Pleiades became the mother of Hermes, god of messengers and thieves? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. A common theme seen in Greek and Roman mythology involves ordinary people being turned into plants or animals, from Hera turning Io into a cow, to Daphne being made into a laurel tree after fighting off Apollo's advances. Which self-absorbed man of myth was so obsessed with his own reflection that he died of thirst and starvation and was then turned into a flower? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. For millenia, people have worshipped their gods in buildings designed to pay homage to a particular deity or group of deities. Which famous church in Italy, that was once a temple designed to honor every god and goddess of Rome, got its name from a word meaning "all the gods"? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. One of the biggest events in classical mythology was a fierce battle between the Olympians and the Titans. In the revolt against Cronus and the Titans, Zeus led his siblings to a hard-fought victory that ended with the Olympians gaining control of the seas, the sky, and the underworld. What was this ten-year-long war between all of the gods called? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. One of the greatest tales of classical mythology is the story of the Trojan War, a ten-year war between the Trojans, led by their mighty champion, Hector, and the Greeks, led by which ruthless man who sacrificed his own daughter to sail to Troy?

Answer: Agamemnon

To acquire the wind to propel his thousand-ship fleet to the shores of Troy, King Agamemnon of Mycenae sacrificed his youngest daughter, Iphigenia, to appease the goddess Artemis, whom he had slighted (in some myths, Iphigenia was saved by the goddess at the last minute and replaced with a stag for slaughter). Agamemnon was one of few Greeks to survive the decade-long war at Troy and the journey home, but was slaughtered by his wife Clytemnestra in his bath shortly after his return.
2. Many modern-day languages use words that have origins in Greek and Roman mythology. The name of which Roman goddess of agriculture, mother of Proserpina and counterpart to the Greek Demeter, was the inspiration for a term used to describe a breakfast food commonly made of grain and eaten with milk?

Answer: Ceres

Ceres was the Roman goddess of grain whose name gives us the English word "cereal". She was sometimes considered part of the threefold mother goddess: Proserpina (maiden), Ceres (mother), Trivia (crone). There was once a cult to Ceres in Rome, that dated back to the early days of the Republic and the dedication of a temple in Aventine in 493 BC to the gods Ceres, Liber, and Libera.
3. A number of historical cities in Greece are believed in mythology to have been the home of an oracle. What popular tourist site in Greece claims to have once been home to the Pythia, oracle of Apollo?

Answer: Delphi

According to mythology, Delphi was once an ancient sanctuary that was home to Apollo's most famous oracle, called the Pythia (the origin of the modern English word "python"). She was a priestess of sorts who would "consult with the god" to answer the questions of his followers.

The oracle would inhale vapors from a chasm in the earth and then make prophecies, while in a trance-like state, which would be interpreted by priests in order to make sense of her intoxicated ramblings.
4. Religions both modern and historical have stories about what happens after one leaves the land of the living, and many tell of different places where the souls of the good and the souls of the wicked go to rest (or not) for eternity. Where, in the underworld of Greek mythology, could souls go to spend their afterlife in the fields of paradise?

Answer: Elysium

Elysium, or the Elysian Fields, was the land of paradise located in the underworld (though it was sometimes located elsewhere, like the Islands of the Blessed). Those who committed sins were denied entry into Elysium and were instead sent to Tartarus, a land of torment. Tartarus (Erebus, or sometimes Hades) was also used as a term to describe the underworld as a whole.

In addition to the lands of paradise and torment, the underworld, overseen by Hades, was home to five rivers of the dead: Styx (hate), Acheron (woe), Lethe (forgetfulness), Cocytus (wailing), and Pyriphlegethon (fire).
5. Monsters often appear in the ancient tales of Greek and Roman heroes who fought them on their way to fame and glory. The hero Perseus once crossed paths with a particularly nasty monster, whose head was crowned with snakes and whose eyes could turn anyone instantly to stone. Medusa, the only mortal monster who possessed the power to turn humans into stone, was one of three sisters collectively known as what?

Answer: The Gorgons

The Gorgons were three terrifyingly ugly daughters of Phorcys and Ceto with the ability to turn mortals into stone. They were sisters to the Graeae, who shared one eye and one tooth between them, and who aided the hero Perseus on his quest to destroy Medusa. Medusa's story is more interesting than just her death at the hands of Perseus, as she was much beloved by the sea-god Poseidon, and was the mother of Pegasus, the famous winged horse, and Chrysaor, "he of the golden sword".
6. Quite a few sun-gods appear throughout Greek and Roman mythology, often with responsibilities and myths that overlap one another. The earliest of the Greek sun gods to appear was a Titan, the son of Gaea (earth) and Uranus/Ouranos (sky) and father to Helius/Helios (sun), Eos (dawn), and Selene (moon). What was his name?

Answer: Hyperion

Hyperion, Helius, and Apollo were all Greek gods of the sun. Hyperion's story has often been overshadowed by that of his son Helius, who would drive his golden chariot across the sky to bring light to each new day, and of Apollo, who in addition to being a sun-god was the god of prophesy, intelligence, reason, music, and medicine. Hyperion's companion and lover was his sister, Theia, goddess of the sun.
7. Constellations grace the skies every night that have names and stories born out of mythology. One such constellation, Taurus, contains a star cluster named for seven sisters called the Pleiades who were pursued by Orion and his dog, Sirius. Which sister of the Pleiades became the mother of Hermes, god of messengers and thieves?

Answer: Maia

The seven Pleiades were the sisters Maia (mother of Hermes), Electra (mother of Iris and the Harpies), Alcyone (a sea-bird), Ta˙gete, Asterope, Celaeno (prophesied Aeneas), and Merope. They were the daughters of Atlas, the Titan who held up the sky, and an Oceanid (child of the Titan Oceanus) called Pleione.

The Pleiades star cluster can been seen in the northern sky as part of the Taurus constellation that sits in front of Orion's bow. Even in the skies, the Pleiades could not escape Orion, cursed to stay forever in his sights.
8. A common theme seen in Greek and Roman mythology involves ordinary people being turned into plants or animals, from Hera turning Io into a cow, to Daphne being made into a laurel tree after fighting off Apollo's advances. Which self-absorbed man of myth was so obsessed with his own reflection that he died of thirst and starvation and was then turned into a flower?

Answer: Narcissus

The tale of Narcissus cannot be told without also telling the tale of Echo. Echo was a nymph who was in love with Narcissus, but was cursed by Juno (Hera), to only be able to utter back words which were spoken to her. She was scorned by Narcissus, who played with her and then left her alone, as he did with many nymphs.

He was later cursed by Nemesis to fall in love with his own reflection and wasted away in front of a pool of spring water, as smooth and reflective as a mirror. A genus of flowers was named for him that includes, among other species, daffodils.
9. For millenia, people have worshipped their gods in buildings designed to pay homage to a particular deity or group of deities. Which famous church in Italy, that was once a temple designed to honor every god and goddess of Rome, got its name from a word meaning "all the gods"?

Answer: Pantheon

The Pantheon in Rome was constructed between 118 and 125 AD, during the reign of Hadrian, on the site of an earlier temple that had been commissioned by Marcus Agrippa, but which had previously burned to the ground (in 80 AD). From the outside, the Pantheon looks like a giant cylinder with a triangular pediment, but on the inside, visitors experience a massive dome that reaches high overhead to an open oculus at the center.

The bottom of the dome is kept from splaying outward by a series of compression rings that encircle the base and are partially hidden by the cylindrical form that is visible from outside the church.

The Pantheon, amazingly, has been in use (as a temple and now as a church) continuously since the day it was completed.
10. One of the biggest events in classical mythology was a fierce battle between the Olympians and the Titans. In the revolt against Cronus and the Titans, Zeus led his siblings to a hard-fought victory that ended with the Olympians gaining control of the seas, the sky, and the underworld. What was this ten-year-long war between all of the gods called?

Answer: Titanomachy

The Titanomachy was the first major clash between gods in Greek mythology. The Titans were the children of Gaea and Uranus (the earth and sky) and had ruled over the earth for a very long time. Cronus, "learning" from his father's mistake, chose to devour his own children instead of sticking them in his wife, to prevent a prophesy from coming true that he would one day be overthrown by his child. Rhea, mother of the Olympians, saved her third son and youngest child, Zeus, by tricking Cronus into swallowing a stone instead of his son. Zeus freed his siblings (Hera, Demeter, Hestia, Poseidon, and Hades) by feeding his father a mixture of mustard and wine, and then released the Cyclopes and Hecatonchires from their prisons. Together they fought for ten years against the Titans, eventually succeeding in taking down Cronus, and imprisoning the Titans in the depths of Tartarus once and for all.
Source: Author kaddarsgirl

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