Quiz about Determined to Know the Difference
Quiz about Determined to Know the Difference

Determined to Know the Difference Quiz


Determiners and pronouns are attached to or replace nouns, depending on the context. How well do you know the difference between them?

A multiple-choice quiz by Treenage. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
Treenage
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
387,366
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
320
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. "You scratch my back and I'll scratch yours." In the spirit of cooperation, people often do things for EACH OTHER and ONE ANOTHER. To which class do these two PRONOUNS belong? Hint

Demonstrative
Reflexive
Reciprocal
Relative

2. The untutored often make the mistake of adding an apostrophe to this singular possessive pronoun. What is the pronoun? Hint

its
our
their
my

3. I'm going to ask you a series of questions just to make sure I get all the relevant information, ma'am. Which kind of determiner is "which"? Hint

Indefinite
Interrogative
Demonstrative
Relative

4. How is "which" used in the following sentence? "The song which I was hoping I'd never hear again is always playing in my favorite restaurant!" Hint

as a determiner
as a noun
as an adjective
as a pronoun

5. If you need or want to be vague, choose this class of pronoun, which includes "some" and "somebody." Hint

Personal
Indefinite
Interrogative
Relative

6. These pronouns refer to specific people and often serve as a sentence's subject. You would sound very silly indeed if you used anything but "I" to talk about yourself! Hint

Reflexive
Demonstrative
Personal
Relative

7. You subtly try to point out your new crush to your friend in the lunchroom without being too expressive. You whisper, "It's that guy!" when he walks by and hope he didn't hear you. What class of determiner served your purpose? Hint

Demonstrative
Indefinite
Possessive
Relative

8. In which sentence does a determiner appear? Hint

Whatever time you show up is fine.
He says whatever he wants.
Whatever made you think I was kidding?
Whatever they did, it worked!

9. Do yourself a favor and correctly identify the list of reflexive pronouns from the choices that follow: Hint

I, you, he, she, it, we
who, whom, that, which, whoever, what
myself, yourself, ourselves, yourselves, themselves
who, what, when, where, why, how

10. The owl has many relatives in the avian world, so maybe that's why it likes to utter this relative pronoun so frequently! Hint

it
who
where
how


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. "You scratch my back and I'll scratch yours." In the spirit of cooperation, people often do things for EACH OTHER and ONE ANOTHER. To which class do these two PRONOUNS belong?

Answer: Reciprocal

Germans use one word ("einander") to say "each other." The Germans are famous for combining words! English reflexive pronouns, however, demonstrate this tendency too: myself, yourself, ourselves, yourselves, etc. This is indicative of the close connection that the two languages still share.
2. The untutored often make the mistake of adding an apostrophe to this singular possessive pronoun. What is the pronoun?

Answer: its

When confronting a hungry bear, it's best not to mess with its honey. If you know the bear is female and want to express her ownership of the honey, you would not add an apostrophe (her's honey), nor would you add an 's.'
3. I'm going to ask you a series of questions just to make sure I get all the relevant information, ma'am. Which kind of determiner is "which"?

Answer: Interrogative

Now which witch is which? Determiners help to pin down the identity of a noun, whereas pronouns act as a substitute for a noun. "These are mine," you say about your bag of chips, but if I'm uncertain which bag is yours, then you'd better specify, "These chips are mine!" by using a determiner.
4. How is "which" used in the following sentence? "The song which I was hoping I'd never hear again is always playing in my favorite restaurant!"

Answer: as a pronoun

"Which" and "that" can usually be used interchangeably as pronouns but not as determiners. For example, you could claim, "Here's the valuable coin that/which I found lying on the street," but you would only say, "That coin is the one I found," not, "Which coin is the one I found" when positively identifying the coin.
5. If you need or want to be vague, choose this class of pronoun, which includes "some" and "somebody."

Answer: Indefinite

Will somebody help me? Anybody? Will none help? Perhaps I should not have used an indefinite pronoun--Frank! Sharon! HELP!
6. These pronouns refer to specific people and often serve as a sentence's subject. You would sound very silly indeed if you used anything but "I" to talk about yourself!

Answer: Personal

"Decartes thinks, therefore he is." We almost exclusively use the personal pronoun "I" when we are the subject of our own sentence. If we use our own name, it seems as if we are talking about someone else. Likewise, when talking to a person whom we know, we use a personal pronoun as a substitute for their name (ex: "You look nice today") so they know we're talking about them.

The exception is when we give a command such as, "George, go to the store." We might also say, "Go to the store" to George, leaving out the "you" in such cases because it's understood.
7. You subtly try to point out your new crush to your friend in the lunchroom without being too expressive. You whisper, "It's that guy!" when he walks by and hope he didn't hear you. What class of determiner served your purpose?

Answer: Demonstrative

The demonstrative determiners all begin with "th" (this, that, these, those). Demonstrative determiners require us to physically demonstrate our preference because we usually point our finger at the ones we want (otherwise, we'd have to say something like, "the brown ones" or "the salty ones").

However, if the desired object is an abstract/invisible concept, no hand gestures are necessary: "Do you remember the instructions I gave you?" the teacher queried. "Oh, THOSE instructions!" answered the embarrassed student.
8. In which sentence does a determiner appear?

Answer: Whatever time you show up is fine.

"Whatever" is a relative pronoun or a relative determiner depending on how it's used in the sentence. The rule of thumb is that when a noun is present, you have a determiner on your hands rather than a pronoun. Here are some more examples of relative determiners in sentences: "Whichever direction you choose, it always ends up being the wrong one!" "What marvelous wainscoting you've got, Scott!"
9. Do yourself a favor and correctly identify the list of reflexive pronouns from the choices that follow:

Answer: myself, yourself, ourselves, yourselves, themselves

Sometimes you can't please anybody but yourself, so it's a good thing that reflexive pronouns make that possible! Of course, reflexive pronouns are not always necessary when we're expressing an action performed on or by ourselves; consider the following examples: "I rested [myself] in the afternoon." "I showered and shaved [myself]."
10. The owl has many relatives in the avian world, so maybe that's why it likes to utter this relative pronoun so frequently!

Answer: who

Grammar Nazis compulsively insist upon using "whom" when the pronoun is an object: "To whom is this letter addressed?" "They weren't sure for whom the singing clown telegram was intended."
Source: Author Treenage

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor ponycargirl before going online.
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