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Quiz about The Romantic Period Authors and Poets
Quiz about The Romantic Period Authors and Poets

The Romantic Period: Authors and Poets Quiz


Process of elimination is the key to this quiz. Each author is the answer to only one question. Two additional questions ask you to name works.

A multiple-choice quiz by skylarb. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
skylarb
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
117,467
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
15
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
9 / 15
Plays
3082
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: Guest 199 (9/15), Guest 157 (2/15), Guest 49 (7/15).
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Question 1 of 15
1. Though an icon of the Romantic period, his works are in some ways the least romantic of the group. He favored traditional forms over new innovations; he preferred satire to introspection; and in "English Bards and Scotch Reviewers," he ridiculed his fellow Romantics as being inferior to the neoclassical poets. Hint


Question 2 of 15
2. Though she wrote during the Romantic period, she is usually classified as a "Regency" writer. Her works do not generally exhibit the viewpoint of the Romantics; indeed, she has even been called anti-romantic, because she seemed to value sense more than sensibility. Hint


Question 3 of 15
3. This author perfected the historical novel, but s/he always wanted to be known as a poet. Hint


Question 4 of 15
4. This forerunner of the Romantics regard himself as something of a prophet; he created his own mythology, which is expressed in such works as "Jerusalem" and "The Four Zoas." Hint


Question 5 of 15
5. This early or pre-Romantic writer is as well known for his Scottish songs as for his poems. Hint


Question 6 of 15
6. We know him best as a writer of supernatural poetry; but in his own day, he was better known for his religious prose. Hint


Question 7 of 15
7. Robert Browning criticized this Romantic for abandoning his ideals and becoming conservative, all so that he might, in Browning's opinion, receive "a riband to stick in his coat." Hint


Question 8 of 15
8. This romantic writer used "Elia" for a pseudonym. He was unusual among the Romantics in his preference for the city over the country. Hint


Question 9 of 15
9. He died of tuberculosis at the age of 25, but not before leaving an impressive body of poems, including "To Autumn" and "Ode on Melancholy." Hint


Question 10 of 15
10. She was a proponent of a woman's right to be educated. Her daughter must have received a suitable education, because she (the daughter) wrote "Frankenstein." Hint


Question 11 of 15
11. This author of "To a Skylark" died by drowning. Hint


Question 12 of 15
12. Technically, he wrote during the Victorian period, but his work is considered to be a product of "American Romanticism." He himself was once an idealist who spent time in a Utopian commune. He lost hope in the power of social reformation, however, and his "Blithedale Romance" depicts a character so intent on reforming humanity, that he does not seem to care for individual men and women. Hint


Question 13 of 15
13. This American Romantic once said, "I stand for the heart. To the dogs with the head!" Hint


Question 14 of 15
14. Byron wrote: "And the might of the Gentile, unsmote by the sword, / Hath melted like snow in the glance of the Lord!" In what poem did these lines appear? Hint


Question 15 of 15
15. This foundational work of the Romantic Period was published by William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Feb 21 2024 : Guest 199: 9/15
Feb 21 2024 : Guest 157: 2/15
Feb 18 2024 : Guest 49: 7/15
Feb 17 2024 : Kiatan200107: 12/15
Feb 15 2024 : Guest 122: 6/15
Feb 14 2024 : Guest 152: 11/15
Feb 13 2024 : Guest 190: 4/15
Feb 13 2024 : Guest 27: 10/15
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Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Though an icon of the Romantic period, his works are in some ways the least romantic of the group. He favored traditional forms over new innovations; he preferred satire to introspection; and in "English Bards and Scotch Reviewers," he ridiculed his fellow Romantics as being inferior to the neoclassical poets.

Answer: Lord Byron

"English Bards and Scotch Reviewers" uses the popular neoclassical form of the heroic couplet. In it, Byron calls Southey "the ballad-monger." He criticizes Wordworth's style: "That simple Wordsworth, framer of a lay . . . / Who, both by precept and example, shows / That prose is verse, and verse is merely prose." And he mocks Coleridge: "Yet none in lofty numbers can surpass / The bard who soars to elegize an ass: / So well the subject suits his noble mind, /He brays, the Laureate of the long-eared kind."
2. Though she wrote during the Romantic period, she is usually classified as a "Regency" writer. Her works do not generally exhibit the viewpoint of the Romantics; indeed, she has even been called anti-romantic, because she seemed to value sense more than sensibility.

Answer: Jane Austen

In Jane Austen's "Sense and Sensibility," she satirizes the sensibility of her age through the character of Marianne, who matures throughout the novel. The "Regency" began in 1811, when the Prince of Wales began to serve as regent for the insane King George III. This occurred during the period of time which is generally referred to as "The Romantic Period."
3. This author perfected the historical novel, but s/he always wanted to be known as a poet.

Answer: Sir Walter Scott

This author of "Waverly," "Rob Roy," " The Heart of Midlothian," and "Ivanhoe" wished to be known for his poetry, because at the time, it was considered the more distinguished literary form. He published his ballads in three volumes, called "Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border."
4. This forerunner of the Romantics regard himself as something of a prophet; he created his own mythology, which is expressed in such works as "Jerusalem" and "The Four Zoas."

Answer: William Blake

Blake is best known for his "Songs of Innocence and of Experience." Even this work possesses a prophetic tone, presenting the poet as a prophet: "Hear the voice of the Bard! / Who Present, Past and Future sees."
5. This early or pre-Romantic writer is as well known for his Scottish songs as for his poems.

Answer: Robert Burns

He wrote his poetry in the vernacular, using the Scottish dialect. His "Auld Lang Syne" has become a popular New Year's song.
6. We know him best as a writer of supernatural poetry; but in his own day, he was better known for his religious prose.

Answer: Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Coleridge's supernatural-themed poems "Kublah Khan," "Cristabel," and "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" are often studied in schools today. His religious writings, however, are largely ignored. Yet he is credited by some with having brought the younger generation back to the Anglican church.
7. Robert Browning criticized this Romantic for abandoning his ideals and becoming conservative, all so that he might, in Browning's opinion, receive "a riband to stick in his coat."

Answer: William Wordsworth

The riband was the poet laureateship, which Wordworth received in 1843. The quote comes from the lament "The Lost Leader," which also alludes to the traitorous act of Judas: "Just for a handful of silver he left us."
8. This romantic writer used "Elia" for a pseudonym. He was unusual among the Romantics in his preference for the city over the country.

Answer: Charles Lamb

His "Essays of Elia" was published in 1825, his "Last Essays of Elia" in 1833. In his essays, Lamb also used a pseudonym for his sister Mary: Bridget. Together, the two wrote a children's book called "Tales from Shakespeare."
9. He died of tuberculosis at the age of 25, but not before leaving an impressive body of poems, including "To Autumn" and "Ode on Melancholy."

Answer: John Keats

Despite his short life, many consider Keats to be the foremost poet of the Romantic era. Shelley eulogized the young poet in his poem "Adonais."
10. She was a proponent of a woman's right to be educated. Her daughter must have received a suitable education, because she (the daughter) wrote "Frankenstein."

Answer: Mary Wollstonecraft

Wollstonecraft's "A Vindication of the Rights of Woman" is one of the earliest feminist works. Her daughter, Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin became Mary Shelley upon her marriage to the poet Percy Bysshe.
11. This author of "To a Skylark" died by drowning.

Answer: Percy Bysshe Shelley

Shelley was a good friend of Byron's, and both poets met early deaths. Shelley is also well known for his "Ozymandias," "Ode to the West Wind," and "Adonais."
12. Technically, he wrote during the Victorian period, but his work is considered to be a product of "American Romanticism." He himself was once an idealist who spent time in a Utopian commune. He lost hope in the power of social reformation, however, and his "Blithedale Romance" depicts a character so intent on reforming humanity, that he does not seem to care for individual men and women.

Answer: Nathaniel Hawthorne

Hawthorne describes Hollingsworth's philanthropy in ghastly terms: "He had taught his benevolence to pour its warm tide exclusively through one channel; so that there was nothing to spare for other great manifestations of love to man, nor scarcely for the nutriment of individual attachments, unless they could minister, in some way, to the terrible egotism which he mistook for an angel of God." Hawthorne's "House of Seven Gables" similarly expresses a negative view toward utopian visions, offering a more moderated optimism.
13. This American Romantic once said, "I stand for the heart. To the dogs with the head!"

Answer: Herman Melville

Melville wrote this in an 1851 letter to Nathaniel Hawthorne. In his later years, he seems to have moderated this view somewhat. His novel "Billy Budd, Sailor" depicts a big-hearted, innocent young man who, because of his naiveté, meets his doom.
14. Byron wrote: "And the might of the Gentile, unsmote by the sword, / Hath melted like snow in the glance of the Lord!" In what poem did these lines appear?

Answer: The Destruction of Sennacherib

Byron was asked by a friend to write poems that would accompany music originally used in the synagogue. As a consequence, Byron produced the "Hebrew Melodies," which contains the famous poem "She Walks in Beauty."
15. This foundational work of the Romantic Period was published by William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

Answer: The Lyrical Ballads

The "Lyrical Ballads" first appeared anonymously in 1797. In the preface of this work we find the Romantic definition of poetry: "the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: it takes it origin from emotion recollected in tranquility..."
Source: Author skylarb

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Related Quizzes
This quiz is part of series Romantic Poets:

My quizzes centering on poets of the Romantic age.

  1. The Romantic Period: Authors and Poets Tough
  2. Ten Romantics Tough
  3. William Blake: The Prophet Poet Tough
  4. The Romantic Lord Byron Tough
  5. A Survey of William Wordsworth's Poetry Average
  6. Byron: The Bad Boy of Poetry Average
  7. Lord Byron's "The Destruction of Sennacherib" Average

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