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Quiz about The Romantic Lord Byron
Quiz about The Romantic Lord Byron

The Romantic Lord Byron Trivia Quiz


This quiz covers the writings of the great Romantic poet Lord Byron, George Gordon.

A multiple-choice quiz by skylarb. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Author
skylarb
Time
6 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
138,146
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
15
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
8 / 15
Plays
870
Last 3 plays: Guest 116 (3/15), andymuenz (15/15), PurpleComet (12/15).
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Question 1 of 15
1. "There are but two sentiments to which I am constant," Lord Byron famously said, "a strong love of _____, and a detestation of cant." Hint


Question 2 of 15
2. Of all the Romantic poets, Byron most sought to overturn the old conventions and to create a new kind of poetry. He despised the neoclassical forms, and usually invented his own.


Question 3 of 15
3. Byron wrote a poem called "Hints from ____" in 1811. Hint


Question 4 of 15
4. This playful satire, written in ottava rima, tells the story of a husband who returns home to his wife in the disguise of a Turk. Hint


Question 5 of 15
5. Byron claimed this poem was "a satire on abuses of the present state of Society, and not an eulogy of vice." Hint


Question 6 of 15
6. This poem was a parody of a work written by the poet laureate Southey, who had once accused Byron of being a member of the "Satanic School" of poetry.
Hint


Question 7 of 15
7. This work was written after Byron became disillusioned by the French Revolution and the Napoleanic Wars. It introduced the prototypical Byronic hero--the romantic, isolated, moody protagonist. Hint


Question 8 of 15
8. This poem is about Frances de Bonivar, who was imprisoned for his religious beliefs during the Reformation. Hint


Question 9 of 15
9. Which of the following was not one of Byron's dramas? Hint


Question 10 of 15
10. These poems were written at the request of Byron's friend Douglas Kinnaird, who wished him to supply lyrics for airs adapted from the music of the synagogues. Hint


Question 11 of 15
11. Which form did Byron not employ? Hint


Question 12 of 15
12. Byron wrote this poem about Frances Webster, a woman he declined to seduce. Hint


Question 13 of 15
13. This drama, labeled blasphemous by some, met with mixed reviews. It has been admired by the conservative Sir Walter Scott, and by the Orthodox Catholic Thomas Moore. Yet the liberal Hobhouse criticized it, as did the rather heterodox William Blake. Hint


Question 14 of 15
14. If you know only one poem by Byron, it's likely you know this one. "She walks in beauty, like the ____"

Answer: (One Word)
Question 15 of 15
15. Bob Dylan may have modeled his song, "Who Killed Davey Moore?" on Byron's poem, "Who Killed _____?" Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Mar 03 2024 : Guest 116: 3/15
Mar 01 2024 : andymuenz: 15/15
Feb 24 2024 : PurpleComet: 12/15
Feb 24 2024 : Guest 80: 13/15
Feb 24 2024 : Guest 178: 0/15
Feb 18 2024 : Guest 49: 1/15
Feb 16 2024 : Guest 157: 4/15
Feb 11 2024 : Guest 117: 5/15
Feb 10 2024 : Guest 117: 4/15

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. "There are but two sentiments to which I am constant," Lord Byron famously said, "a strong love of _____, and a detestation of cant."

Answer: Liberty

His "strong love of liberty" inspired him to train and subsidizes the Republican forces in Missolonghi, Greece in their War for Independence. There he died at the age of 36.
2. Of all the Romantic poets, Byron most sought to overturn the old conventions and to create a new kind of poetry. He despised the neoclassical forms, and usually invented his own.

Answer: False

Byron was unique among Romantic poets in that he respected the neoclassical poets and sought, to some degree, to emulate them. In his poem "English Bards and Scotch Reviewers," he ridiculed the poets of his own day, whom he considered to be vastly inferior to the neoclassical poets.

He called Southey, "the ballad-monger"; he said that Wordsworth only proved "[t]hat prose is verse, and verse is merely prose"; and he quipped of Coleridge: "Yet none in lofty numbers can surpass / The bard who soars to elegize an ass."
3. Byron wrote a poem called "Hints from ____" in 1811.

Answer: Horace

Horace's "Ara Poetica" had served as a kind of Bible to the neo-classicists. Byron despised Horace as a young student, but he later considered his lessons to be valuable.
4. This playful satire, written in ottava rima, tells the story of a husband who returns home to his wife in the disguise of a Turk.

Answer: Beppo

The poem is written in an Italian form with eight line stanzas, with 11 syllables, rhyming abababcc. Beppo is the husband of Laura. He is a merchant, and since he is gone a long time at sea, she chooses for herself a "vice-husband" to protect her. Beppo returns appearing as a Turk.
5. Byron claimed this poem was "a satire on abuses of the present state of Society, and not an eulogy of vice."

Answer: Don Juan

"Don Juan," one of Byron's longer works, was begun in 1818 and finally completed in 1822.
6. This poem was a parody of a work written by the poet laureate Southey, who had once accused Byron of being a member of the "Satanic School" of poetry.

Answer: The Vision of Judgement

The poem parodies Southey's "Vision of Judgement," which the poet laureate had written when George III died. Byron's version ridicules Southey and presumes to tell the true story of how George III really got into heaven. In Byron's version, the angels and fallen angels were debating whether or not George III should be let in when Southey was brought to read his "Vision." The poem was so awful that all the angels ran away screaming, and George snuck in the gates.
7. This work was written after Byron became disillusioned by the French Revolution and the Napoleanic Wars. It introduced the prototypical Byronic hero--the romantic, isolated, moody protagonist.

Answer: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage

The poem, first published in 1812, dealt with one of the primary romantic dilemmas: the obsessive search for an ideal that does not and cannot exist in the real world.
8. This poem is about Frances de Bonivar, who was imprisoned for his religious beliefs during the Reformation.

Answer: The Prisoner of Chillion

Byron admired Bonivar not for his religious beliefs but rather because he stood up for liberty. The poem is written mainly in romantic couplets (iambic tetrameter) with some variation.
9. Which of the following was not one of Byron's dramas?

Answer: The Siege of Corinth

"The Siege of Corinth," rather, was one of Byron's tales of adventure. It is about an episode during the Turk's siege and capture of the Venetian's citadel in 1715. "Heaven and Earth" was a drama he never completed, and "Cain" and "Manfred" were both closet dramas, that is, they were not performed on stage
10. These poems were written at the request of Byron's friend Douglas Kinnaird, who wished him to supply lyrics for airs adapted from the music of the synagogues.

Answer: Hebrew Melodies

Nine of the poems cover Biblical subjects, two are love songs, five are reflective lyrics, and five have been dubbed by academics to be expressions of "proto-Zionism."
11. Which form did Byron not employ?

Answer: He used all of these

"Stanzas for Music II" is written in heptameter couplets, which have 7 feet per line. "Darkness" was written in blank verse, or unrhymed iambic pentameter. "Beppo" was written in ottava rima.
12. Byron wrote this poem about Frances Webster, a woman he declined to seduce.

Answer: "When We Two Parted"

Byron didn't seduce her because she was a newlywed; but within a year it was reported she was having an affair with someone else, so Byron felt cheated. "Fare Thee Well" was about his separation from his wife.
13. This drama, labeled blasphemous by some, met with mixed reviews. It has been admired by the conservative Sir Walter Scott, and by the Orthodox Catholic Thomas Moore. Yet the liberal Hobhouse criticized it, as did the rather heterodox William Blake.

Answer: Cain

Byron defended himself by saying, "If 'Cain' be blasphemous, 'Paradise Lost' is blasphemous." (Source: Colerigde, E.H. "From E.H. Coleridge's Introduction to Cain." The Bare Bones Literature Handbook. Ed. Will and Mimosa Stephenson. Brownsville: U of T at Brownsville, 1999.)
14. If you know only one poem by Byron, it's likely you know this one. "She walks in beauty, like the ____"

Answer: night

This poem was part of the "Hebrew Melodies." It famously begins: "She walks in Beauty, like the night /
Of cloudless climes and starry skies; / And all that's best of dark and bright / Meet in her aspect and her eyes."
15. Bob Dylan may have modeled his song, "Who Killed Davey Moore?" on Byron's poem, "Who Killed _____?"

Answer: John Keats

Byron writes: "Who killed John Keats? / 'I,' says the Quarterly, / So savage and Tartarly; / 'Twas one of my feats.'" Compare Dylan's: "Who killed Davey Moore, / Why an' what's the reason for? / 'Not I,' says the referee, / 'Don't point your finger at me.'
Source: Author skylarb

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor Bruyere before going online.
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