FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about Black Women Politicians and Activists
Quiz about Black Women Politicians and Activists

Black Women Politicians and Activists Quiz


Black women have played powerful roles in civil rights, suffrage, abolition, education, and advocacy. Here are only a few.

A multiple-choice quiz by Rehaberpro. Estimated time: 5 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. People Trivia
  6. »
  7. U.S.A. People
  8. »
  9. African-Americans

Author
Rehaberpro
Time
5 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
312,734
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
1625
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. Who was the first Black woman to make a serious run with a major party for the Presidency? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. She was certainly the most controversial Black woman of the 1970s. She supported the Black Panthers as well as the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. When a riot ensued when a courtroom was invaded by militants, Judge Harold Haley was killed. The shotgun used was found to belong to her. She went underground for two months and was on the FBI 10 Most Wanted List. Who was she? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. She was one of the powerful women of the civil rights and voting movement. She lead a delegation to the Democratic Convention in 1964 to protest the seating of an all white delegation from Mississippi. When offered a compromise which would have seated two Black delegates, she replied "We didn't come all the way up here to compromise. We didn't come all the way for no two seats 'cause we are all of us tired". The protest lost but the Convention voted for racial balance in 1968. She told Hubert Humphrey that the democrats would lose as they had turned their backs on the civil rights movement. Who was she? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Barbara Jordan served six years in Congress and built a reputation as keen legislator and an eloquent speaker. She made a powerful speech calling for the impeachment of Richard Nixon. She was the keynote speaker at the Democratic Convention of 1976 and 1992. What State did she represent in Congress? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. For the most part the abolitionist movement in the 19th century was lead by religious folk and white women of means. This woman was born to slavery in a northern State, New York. Her owner promised her freedom but reneged, so rather than 'run' away, she 'walked' away. She adopted a new name and became a leading Black abolitionist. By what name is she known? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Harriet Tubman was associated with which railroad? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. She was not the first Black woman to refuse to give up her bus seat to a white person but she was the first to spark a major boycott of the bus system in Montgomery, Alabama; a boycott by Black riders that spread in various intensity to other cities. She has been called the "Mother of the Modern Civil Rights Movement". What is her name? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. When Martin Luther King was assassinated, his wife, Coretta Scott King, played a leadership role in keeping his ideals and visions alive. What is the central core concept of the movement she founded? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Milla Granson is an enigma. No one knows when she was born or died, if she married and had children, or any other personal history. But, for her time, she was one of the bravest women to confront the system. What was her contribution? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. She served as Senator from Illinois for six years followed by a stint as Ambassador to New Zealand. She was the first African-American woman to serve in the Senate. What was her name? Hint



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Most Recent Scores
May 18 2024 : Guest 136: 6/10
May 17 2024 : Guest 107: 10/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Who was the first Black woman to make a serious run with a major party for the Presidency?

Answer: Shirley Chisholm

Chisholm was the first black woman to serve in the House of Representatives, from 1969 to 1983. In 1972 she ran in the primaries and got 152 votes on the first ballot at the Democratic Convention. She is given credit for organizing the Black Caucus in Congress.
2. She was certainly the most controversial Black woman of the 1970s. She supported the Black Panthers as well as the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. When a riot ensued when a courtroom was invaded by militants, Judge Harold Haley was killed. The shotgun used was found to belong to her. She went underground for two months and was on the FBI 10 Most Wanted List. Who was she?

Answer: Angela Davis

Davis was acquitted in a well publicized trial as the prosecution could not draw a connection between the gun and its registered owner. Davis worked as a college professor at the University of California except for a brief time when Governor Ronald Reagan attempted to have her fired. Twice she ran for Vice-President with Communist Party's Gus Hall in 1980 and 1984.

She has written numerous books and is an international lecturer.
3. She was one of the powerful women of the civil rights and voting movement. She lead a delegation to the Democratic Convention in 1964 to protest the seating of an all white delegation from Mississippi. When offered a compromise which would have seated two Black delegates, she replied "We didn't come all the way up here to compromise. We didn't come all the way for no two seats 'cause we are all of us tired". The protest lost but the Convention voted for racial balance in 1968. She told Hubert Humphrey that the democrats would lose as they had turned their backs on the civil rights movement. Who was she?

Answer: Fannie Lou Hamer

Fannie Lou Hamer spent the rest of her life working for civil rights and voting issues. She twice ran unsuccessful campaigns for Congress. She spoke to groups in every part of the country until her death of breast cancer in 1977. Her tombstone reads:"I am sick and tired of being sick and tired".
4. Barbara Jordan served six years in Congress and built a reputation as keen legislator and an eloquent speaker. She made a powerful speech calling for the impeachment of Richard Nixon. She was the keynote speaker at the Democratic Convention of 1976 and 1992. What State did she represent in Congress?

Answer: Texas

Jordan was on the short list for Vice-President but yielded to Walter Mondale. After retiring from Congress, she taught Law at the University of Texas. Her 1976 Convention speech is regarded by historians as one of the great speeches of the 20th century.
5. For the most part the abolitionist movement in the 19th century was lead by religious folk and white women of means. This woman was born to slavery in a northern State, New York. Her owner promised her freedom but reneged, so rather than 'run' away, she 'walked' away. She adopted a new name and became a leading Black abolitionist. By what name is she known?

Answer: Sojourner Truth

Truth's famous speech was "Ain't I a Woman". Here is a paragraph from that speech:

"That man over there says that women need to be helped into carriages, and lifted over ditches, and to have the best place everywhere. Nobody ever helps me into carriages, or over mud-puddles, or gives me any best place! And ain't I a woman? Look at me! Look at my arm! I have ploughed and planted, and gathered into barns, and no man could head me! And ain't I a woman? I could work as much and eat as much as a man - when I could get it - and bear the lash as well! And ain't I a woman? I have borne five children, and seen most all sold off to slavery, and when I cried out with my mother's grief, none but Jesus heard me! And ain't I a woman?"
6. Harriet Tubman was associated with which railroad?

Answer: Underground

Tubman is reported to have made multiple trips to the South to guide slaves to freedom through a network of friendly abolitionist and anti-slavery homes and safe houses. It was called the Underground Railroad. Tubman herself was a runaway slave from Maryland.

As a slave she was given a severe blow to the head which caused her to have headaches and 'visions' all her life. She was involved in John Brown's raid. After the Civil War she became an activist for women's suffrage.
7. She was not the first Black woman to refuse to give up her bus seat to a white person but she was the first to spark a major boycott of the bus system in Montgomery, Alabama; a boycott by Black riders that spread in various intensity to other cities. She has been called the "Mother of the Modern Civil Rights Movement". What is her name?

Answer: Rosa Parks

Parks became a fixture of the civil rights movement. She was often at rallies with Martin Luther King. She was a recipient of many honors and awards. Later, she retired to private life in Detroit where she developed dementia in her final days. Her estate sued the rap group Outkast for disrespectful lyrics about Parks.
8. When Martin Luther King was assassinated, his wife, Coretta Scott King, played a leadership role in keeping his ideals and visions alive. What is the central core concept of the movement she founded?

Answer: Social change through non-violence

Coretta King, like her husband, had a deep sense of family, but in the years that passed, it was as if the ghost of King spoke through her. She took on a number of leadership roles; she established the Center for Non-Violent Change in Atlanta; she spoke out on a number of issues including women's rights, gay rights, and apartheid.

Her children have all been activists on various civil rights causes.
9. Milla Granson is an enigma. No one knows when she was born or died, if she married and had children, or any other personal history. But, for her time, she was one of the bravest women to confront the system. What was her contribution?

Answer: She taught other slaves to read

In slave States it was illegal to teach a slave to read. Granson's midnight classes were in conflict with this. A few slave owners gave permission but it remained clearly against the law. When this issue came to the attention of the Louisiana legislature, they modified the law to say that one slave could teach another slave.
10. She served as Senator from Illinois for six years followed by a stint as Ambassador to New Zealand. She was the first African-American woman to serve in the Senate. What was her name?

Answer: Carol Mosley Braun

Braun's time in the Senate was limited due to the controversy she engendered. She was accused of mismanagement of campaign funds. She fired back, in essence, that if she were not Black there would be no big deal. In 2004 she mounted a campaign for the Presidency but withdrew before the Iowa caucus in favor of Howard Dean.
Source: Author Rehaberpro

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor Snowman before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
Related Quizzes
This quiz is part of series American Leaders:

What do you know about American leaders?

  1. Black Women Politicians and Activists Average
  2. American Jewish Leaders Average
  3. Native American Leaders Average
  4. Eugene V. Debs, A True Believer Average
  5. Famous US Secretaries of State Easier

7/13/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us