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Quiz about Quizzing the New Testament  Romans
Quiz about Quizzing the New Testament  Romans

Quizzing the New Testament : Romans


This is part of a series looking at the books of the New Testament. Romans is Paul's great masterpiece in which he sets down all that he understands by the Christian gospel. Come and step inside.

A multiple-choice quiz by glendathecat. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
glendathecat
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
318,641
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
1622
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: Guest 154 (4/10), Guest 197 (10/10), Guest 166 (9/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. Paul begins his letter to the Romans with a few words of self-introduction. Why is this particularly relevant?
Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Which of these is NOT a phrase that Paul uses to describe himself?
Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Here's a brief overview of Romans. In the first eleven chapters of the book, Paul presents a systematic defence of what he believes. In the remaining chapters, he turns his attention to the practical Christian lifestyle. At the join of these two sections, Paul seeks a practical response from his readers to the argument that has gone before. What does Paul ask people to do? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Paul begins his exposition by arguing that everyone - Jew and Gentile alike - needs God's grace. How does he sum this up in chapter 3? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. In Chapters 4 and 5, Paul refers back to which two characters from the Old Testament?

Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Baptism was a Christian's outward sign of a new life of faith. In chapter 6, Paul compares baptism to which earthly activity as an illustration of the new relationship that Christians enjoy with God? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. In chapter 8, what does Paul say is "able to separate us from" God's love? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Paul has already argued that Jews need to respond to the gospel just as much as Gentiles. In chapter 11, what does he believe will be the final fate of the people of Israel? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. In chapter 13, Paul urges his readers to obey the earthly authorities. What argument does he use to support this instruction? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Chapter 16 mostly contains a collection of greetings to and from various people. To whom does Paul send greetings, describing them as his "fellow workers in Christ Jesus"? Hint



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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Paul begins his letter to the Romans with a few words of self-introduction. Why is this particularly relevant?

Answer: This is a church that Paul has neither founded nor visited.

Paul had not visited Rome previously, which is made clear from what he writes:
"First, I thank my God through Jesus Christ for all of you, because your faith is being reported all over the world. God, whom I serve with my whole heart in preaching the gospel of his Son, is my witness how constantly I remember you in my prayers at all times; and I pray that now at last by God's will the way may be opened for me to come to you." (Romans 1 v. 8-10)

The book of Acts records that Paul was granted his desire to go to Rome (Acts 28) and, according to tradition, he was martyred there. There is no direct biblical evidence as to who founded the Roman church although a longstanding tradition names Peter as the founder. None of Paul's letters are to churches located in Israel.
2. Which of these is NOT a phrase that Paul uses to describe himself?

Answer: He is a bringer of light

"Paul, a servant of Christ Jesus, called to be an apostle and set apart for the gospel of God..." (Romans 1 v. 1)

Paul identifies himself as an apostle in almost all of his letters. This is probably to counter the claims of his opponents that his authority was to be questioned, as he was not one of those originally called by Jesus. Paul sought to justify his claim to be an apostle by reference to his vision of Jesus on the road to Damascus (Acts 9).
3. Here's a brief overview of Romans. In the first eleven chapters of the book, Paul presents a systematic defence of what he believes. In the remaining chapters, he turns his attention to the practical Christian lifestyle. At the join of these two sections, Paul seeks a practical response from his readers to the argument that has gone before. What does Paul ask people to do?

Answer: They should offer their bodies as living sacrifices.

"Therefore, I urge you, brothers, in view of God's mercy, to offer your bodies as living sacrifices, holy and pleasing to God - this is your spiritual act of worship." (Romans 12 v. 1)

As Paul describes what it means to live as a Christian, he uses some beautiful language. Some of the phrases have echoes in the poem "Desiderata" and I often wonder whether Max Ehrmann drew some of his inspiration from here.

"Love must be sincere. Hate what is evil; cling to what is good." (Romans 12 v. 9)

"Rejoice with those who rejoice; mourn with those who mourn." (Romans 12 v. 15)

"Live in harmony with one another. Do not be proud, but be willing to associate with people of low position. Do not be conceited." (Romans 12 v. 16)

"If it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with everyone." (Romans 12 v. 18)
4. Paul begins his exposition by arguing that everyone - Jew and Gentile alike - needs God's grace. How does he sum this up in chapter 3?

Answer: All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.

"This righteousness from God comes through faith in Jesus Christ to all who believe. There is no difference, for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, and are justified freely by his grace through the redemption that came by Christ Jesus." (Romans 3 v. 22-24)

All, Paul claims, have selfish desires within them that will, if unchecked, lead on to wicked actions (Romans 1). The Jews are at an advantage because they have the Law but this, he says, can only identify sin. It is powerless to prevent it (Romans 3).
5. In Chapters 4 and 5, Paul refers back to which two characters from the Old Testament?

Answer: Abraham and Adam

In Chapter 4, he argues that if we are to have righteousness - a right relationship with God - this comes through faith and not works. He quotes a verse from Abraham's story to show that Abraham was put right with God through faith and not circumcision or other outward actions:
"Abraham believed God, and it was credited to him as righteousness." (Genesis 5 v. 6)

In chapter 5, he contrasts Adam, by whom, he says, sin and death came into the world, with Jesus, who brings the potential for restored life to everyone.
6. Baptism was a Christian's outward sign of a new life of faith. In chapter 6, Paul compares baptism to which earthly activity as an illustration of the new relationship that Christians enjoy with God?

Answer: Burial

"Or don't you know that all of us who were baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? We were therefore buried with him through baptism into death in order that, just as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, we too may live a new life." (Romans 6 v. 3-4)

"In Christ" is one of Paul's favourite phrases, which he uses in many of his letters. By it, he seeks to paint a picture of identification. Christ, in coming to Earth, entered fully into our life. He identified himself with us. Through faith, we identify ourselves with him and share in his death, resurrection and heavenly status.
7. In chapter 8, what does Paul say is "able to separate us from" God's love?

Answer: Nothing

"For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord." (Romans 8 v. 38-39)

This is an incredibly affirming chapter. It begins by stating that "there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus" (Romans 8 v. 1). It moves on to describe the transformation brought by the Spirit of Jesus living in us. And it finishes by asserting that nothing can separate us from God's love.
8. Paul has already argued that Jews need to respond to the gospel just as much as Gentiles. In chapter 11, what does he believe will be the final fate of the people of Israel?

Answer: They will be saved.

"I do not want you to be ignorant of this mystery, brothers, so that you may not be conceited: Israel has experienced a hardening in part until the full number of the Gentiles has come in. And so all Israel will be saved..." (Romans 11 v. 25-26)

In Paul's mind, he does not see the Gentile Christians as having supplanted the Jewish people in God's affections. Rather, he uses the illustration of their being grafted, as a cutting from a wild olive tree, onto a previously cultivated tree (Romans 11 v. 24)
9. In chapter 13, Paul urges his readers to obey the earthly authorities. What argument does he use to support this instruction?

Answer: All authority is given by God.

"Everyone must submit himself to the governing authorities, for there is no authority except that which God has established. The authorities that exist have been established by God. Consequently, he who rebels against the authority is rebelling against what God has instituted, and those who do so will bring judgment on themselves." (Romans 13 v. 1-2)

These are hotly debated verses. It should be remembered that Paul is writing for a specific pastoral situation in which he appears to be presuming a society that functions for the good of all its members. We have no record of what he might have said a few years later under a despotic emperor (Nero), living by amoral principles and determined to persecute the Christian faith.
10. Chapter 16 mostly contains a collection of greetings to and from various people. To whom does Paul send greetings, describing them as his "fellow workers in Christ Jesus"?

Answer: Priscilla and Aquila

Paul first met Priscilla and Aquila in Corinth (Acts 17). They were exiles from Rome due to the actions of the emperor Claudius and, subsequently, accompanied Paul to Ephesus. There they were instrumental in the spiritual development of Apollos. Paul also records their names in the closing section of 1 Corinthians and 2 Timothy.

Their inclusion here suggests that, at some stage, they had been able to return home.
Source: Author glendathecat

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor CellarDoor before going online.
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