Quiz about Read My Lips
Quiz about Read My Lips

Read My Lips Trivia Quiz


Lipreading is one of the ways in which people who are deaf or hard of hearing communicate. See how much you know about it.

A multiple-choice quiz by Ilona_Ritter. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
Ilona_Ritter
Time
3 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
359,344
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
562
Last 3 plays: Guest 32 (0/10), Guest 135 (8/10), dmaxst (9/10).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. Which of the following is another name for lip reading? Hint

There is no other name
Mouth reading
Speech reading
Face reading

2. Which of the following words looks different to the others when lip read? Hint

Dog
Cat
Hat
Sat

3. Lip reading can be used in criminal investigations.

True
False

4. Which of these is NOT something you should do to help a person read your lips? Hint

Face the light when speaking
Speak really fast
Speak clearly
Avoid touching your face

5. All deaf people can read lips.

True
False

6. What is a homophene? Hint

Two words that sound the same
Two words that look the same on the lips
Two words that are spelled the same
Two words that rhyme

7. Which of the following can be a problem for a lip reader? Hint

Rapid talking
Mustaches
Not everyone talks the same way
All can be problems

8. Another thing that helps lip readers is context. What is context? Hint

The situation in which the word is being used
The choice of words a person uses
The number of words in the sentence
The volume of a person's voice

9. How much of consonant sounds is visible in lipreading? Hint

Around 1/5
Around 2/5
Around 3/5
Around 4/5

10. In what century did lip reading first appear as far as we know from history records? Hint

16th century
18th century
17th century
19th century


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Which of the following is another name for lip reading?

Answer: Speech reading

Lip reading is a way to communicate by "reading" the lips, face and tongue of the person who is speaking. It is not easy to do and not the most effective way to communicate but with other cues it can aid in communication.
2. Which of the following words looks different to the others when lip read?

Answer: Dog

Look in a mirror and you'll see that the words "hat", "cat" and "sat" are mouthed the same way. Because of this, facial expressions and body language are also important visual cues to a lip reader.
3. Lip reading can be used in criminal investigations.

Answer: True

Lip readers who are really skilled can be used to read the lips of a person on tape. A transcript of what was said is admissable as evidence in a trial.
4. Which of these is NOT something you should do to help a person read your lips?

Answer: Speak really fast

If you speak too fast or too slow a person will not be able to read your lips easily. You should speak as you normally do and use facial expressions.
5. All deaf people can read lips.

Answer: False

Lip reading is very difficult to do, and only about 30-40% of our words are readily readable. As stated earlier, many words (e.g pail, bail and mail) look the same when formed by the mouth.
6. What is a homophene?

Answer: Two words that look the same on the lips

Alexander Graham Bell coined the word homophene. Examples of a homophene are bat, mat and pat. If you mouth these three words you will see they look the same. All homophones are homophenes; however the reverse is not true.
7. Which of the following can be a problem for a lip reader?

Answer: All can be problems

Most people speak about 13 sounds a second, but a lip reader usually can only read about 8 words a second, making lip reading very difficult. People from different areas pronounce words differently therefore, the word may look different when the lip reader reads it. Often when a person has a mustache the lip reader can not fully see the lips to read them.
8. Another thing that helps lip readers is context. What is context?

Answer: The situation in which the word is being used

"It's raining" looks the same as "He's writing". However, if the conversation is about weather "He's writing" would not make sense. Therefore, context is very important in understanding lip reading.
9. How much of consonant sounds is visible in lipreading?

Answer: Around 2/5

There are 25 consonant sounds in the American English language. Of these, there are only 9 visual movements that appear different enough to distinguish one from the other.
10. In what century did lip reading first appear as far as we know from history records?

Answer: 16th century

While there was not much in the way of education for the deaf or hard of hearing back in the 16th century, there were people who learned to lipread. Part of the reason for this was they didn't want people to talk different from the other people in the area.
Source: Author Ilona_Ritter

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor stedman before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
Most Recent Scores
Jan 06 2023 : Guest 32: 0/10
Jan 04 2023 : Guest 135: 8/10
Dec 07 2022 : dmaxst: 9/10

Score Distribution

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This quiz is part of series Commission #28:

The human body is the focal point for this twenty-eighth Commission from the Author's Lounge. Releasing in May 2013, this one challenged participants to write quizzes based on titles received containing body parts.

  1. Hannibal's Trunk Easier
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  3. Hero with a 'Heart' Average
  4. The Blink of an Eye Very Easy
  5. I'm a Legend Average
  6. Humerus, Will You? Easier
  7. A Blind Eye Average
  8. Read My Lips Average
  9. Your Hands Are Tied Easier
  10. It's Behind You! Easier
  11. Cat's Eye Average
  12. Sing The Body Electric Average

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