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Quiz about Your Hands Are Tied
Quiz about Your Hands Are Tied

Your Hands Are Tied Trivia Quiz


"Your hands are tied and you're in custody." Here's a look at some criminals who were finally captured after wreaking havoc.

A multiple-choice quiz by CmdrK. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
CmdrK
Time
3 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
359,537
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
1599
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: pointparkchic (8/10), granpa46 (8/10), comark2000 (10/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. People breathed a sigh of relief when this female criminal was captured. What was Anne Bonny's line of work?
Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. The man who played the key role in organizing Hitler's holocaust fled to Argentina after World War II and was finally captured in 1960. Who was he? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Who was the American organized crime boss who was so successful at avoiding prosecution that he was nicknamed "The Teflon Don"? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Which English aristocrat was a favorite of Queen Elizabeth I but ended up a prisoner in the Tower of London and was finally executed?
Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. In the 17th century a Hungarian countess was accused of killing dozens, if not hundreds, of young girls. Who was she? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Who was the Australian criminal, known as a bushranger, whose exploits gave him a place in the country's folklore? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. A few considered him a modern day Robin Hood but he was a gangster who escaped prosecution until finally brought to justice on tax evasion charges. Who was this Chicago mob boss?
Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Who was the man who believed that lyrics of the Beatles' song "Helter Skelter" were instructions to begin a race war?
Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Which Nazi party leader flew to Britain during World War II, thinking he could broker a peace treaty, and ended up spending the rest of his life in prison? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. A woman in Massachusetts, U.S.A. has been branded an axe murderer, even though she was acquitted at trial. Who was this unfortunate woman? Hint



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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. People breathed a sigh of relief when this female criminal was captured. What was Anne Bonny's line of work?

Answer: piracy

Little is known about Anne Bonny's early years but she was probably born between 1697 and 1700 in Ireland. Her family moved to America when she was young; as a teenager she and James Bonny moved to Nassau. She became a pirate's mistress, then a pirate herself, finally being captured by the British in 1720. She avoided hanging only because she was pregnant. She and shipmate Mary Read were the only two women accused of piracy in the 18th century.
2. The man who played the key role in organizing Hitler's holocaust fled to Argentina after World War II and was finally captured in 1960. Who was he?

Answer: Adolf Eichmann

Otto Adolf Eichmann was taken into custody (under a false name) by U.S. forces at the end of World War II but escaped and eventually made his way to Argentina. He was captured by Israeli Mossad agents, brought back to Israel, found guilty of many war crimes and hanged. He is the only person to be executed in Israel after a civilian court conviction.
3. Who was the American organized crime boss who was so successful at avoiding prosecution that he was nicknamed "The Teflon Don"?

Answer: John Gotti

John Gotti was born in the Bronx, New York City, in 1940. He began working with street gangs as a teenager and was accepted into the Gambino crime family. He became the head of the family in 1986, escaping conviction on a number of charges until he was convicted of murder, conspiracy to commit murder and other charges in 1992. He died of cancer in the U.S. Medical Center for Federal Prisoners in 2002.
4. Which English aristocrat was a favorite of Queen Elizabeth I but ended up a prisoner in the Tower of London and was finally executed?

Answer: Sir Walter Raleigh

Walter Raleigh was a writer, poet, soldier and explorer. He played an important role in colonizing North America and sailed to South America in search of a city of gold. After Elizabeth's death in 1603 he was imprisoned in the Tower of London for allegedly being involved in a plot to kill King James I.

He was sentenced to death but King James spared his life. He was released in 1616 and led another expedition to South America. While there, some of his men attacked a Spanish settlement in Venezuela. Upon Raleigh's return to England the Spanish ambassador insisted Raleigh's death sentence be reimposed.

It was, and Raleigh was executed in 1618.
5. In the 17th century a Hungarian countess was accused of killing dozens, if not hundreds, of young girls. Who was she?

Answer: Elizabeth Bathory

Elizabeth Bathory was born to a noble family in Hungary in 1560 or 1561. She married Ferenc Nadasdy in 1575; his wedding gift to her was a castle in Slovakia. After his death in 1604 she and four others were accused of torturing and killing hundreds of girls. One person accused her of bathing in the blood of virgins in the hope that this would preserve her youth. Elizabeth was neither tried nor convicted but in 1610 was walled up in a set of rooms in her castle until her death in 1614.
6. Who was the Australian criminal, known as a bushranger, whose exploits gave him a place in the country's folklore?

Answer: Ned Kelly

Edward "Ned" Kelly, an Australian of Irish descent, was convicted of three murders and hung in 1880. Some consider him a folk hero, representing resistance against the Anglo-Australian ruling class of the time. His body was dissected by medical students and the details of the burial of his remains were clouded and confusing. In 2008, Kelly's body, minus his head, was found at the site of Pentridge Prison in Coburg, Victoria. His grand-niece supplied DNA to prove the identity.

In the early days of Australian settlement "bushranger" was a term applied to escaped convicts who were adept at surviving in the bush or wilderness. The term was eventually applied to armed robbers who lived in the bush.
7. A few considered him a modern day Robin Hood but he was a gangster who escaped prosecution until finally brought to justice on tax evasion charges. Who was this Chicago mob boss?

Answer: Al Capone

New York City-born Alphonse "Al" Capone moved to Chicago to make money by smuggling alcoholic beverages during America's prohibition era. He was linked to other criminal activities including murder, bribery of public officials and prostitution. He served eight years in federal prison for tax evasion. Capone died of a heart attack in 1947.
8. Who was the man who believed that lyrics of the Beatles' song "Helter Skelter" were instructions to begin a race war?

Answer: Charles Manson

Charles Manson was the leader of the "Manson Family" commune in California in the 1960s. A songwriter of sorts, Manson thought "Helter Skelter" by the Beatles heralded a race war. To begin that war he dispatched members of his commune to kill six people including actress Sharon Tate. He, along with three of his followers, were convicted of murder.
9. Which Nazi party leader flew to Britain during World War II, thinking he could broker a peace treaty, and ended up spending the rest of his life in prison?

Answer: Rudolf Hess

Rudolf Hess was appointed Deputy Fuhrer to Adolf Hitler in 1933. As Germany became enmeshed in World War II, Hess felt underutilized. Thinking that Germany would become mired down in the invasion of the Soviet Union, Hess flew to Britain hoping to broker a peace treaty which would remove one front of fighting. Landing in Scotland, he was immediately arrested and held in British custody until the end of the war. He was then returned to Germany, tried at Nuremberg for war crimes, and sentenced to life in prison. He died in Spandau Prison, Germany, in 1987.
10. A woman in Massachusetts, U.S.A. has been branded an axe murderer, even though she was acquitted at trial. Who was this unfortunate woman?

Answer: Lizzie Borden

Lizzie Borden was a resident of Fall River, Massachusetts. She was accused of the axe murders of her father and stepmother in 1892. The trial made national headlines but Borden was acquitted after the jury had deliberated for only an hour and a half. Though she might otherwise be only a footnote in history, her name has been immortalized by a jump-rope rhyme about her supposed exploits and a song by the Chad Mitchell Trio.
Source: Author CmdrK

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
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This quiz is part of series Commission #28:

The human body is the focal point for this twenty-eighth Commission from the Author's Lounge. Releasing in May 2013, this one challenged participants to write quizzes based on titles received containing body parts.

  1. Hannibal's Trunk Easier
  2. Any Spine? Average
  3. Hero with a 'Heart' Average
  4. The Blink of an Eye Very Easy
  5. I'm a Legend Average
  6. Humerus, Will You? Easier
  7. A Blind Eye Average
  8. Read My Lips Average
  9. Your Hands Are Tied Easier
  10. It's Behind You! Easier
  11. Cat's Eye Average
  12. Sing The Body Electric Average

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