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Quiz about Castles in the Sky and The Ruins on the Rhine
Quiz about Castles in the Sky and The Ruins on the Rhine

Castles in the Sky and The Ruins on the Rhine Quiz


On this journey we shall be travelling, on foot, northward along the eastern bank of the Rhine Gorge, from Rudesheim-am-Rhein to Koblenz. I hope that my quiz may entice you, dear reader, to visit this wonderful and mysterious region of Germany.

A multiple-choice quiz by SisterSeagull. Estimated time: 9 mins.
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Time
9 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
355,426
Updated
Mar 16 24
# Qns
20
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
13 / 20
Plays
343
Last 3 plays: Guest 38 (15/20), Guest 98 (11/20), Fiona112233 (15/20).
Question 1 of 20
1. We meet to begin our journey at a Weinstube, or wine tavern, on the narrow alley in Rüdesheim-am-Rhein, famous across the world for the quality of the foods and drink on offer here. True or false: this alley is named Unter den Linden?


Question 2 of 20
2. Before we leave Rüdesheim-am-Rhein for the twelve mile hike along the footpath known as the Rheinsteig to the pretty town of Lorch, we visit a distillery that produces a fine brandwein, or brandy. What is the name of this world famous spirit? Hint


Question 3 of 20
3. The climb to the start of the Rheinsteig involves a short walk or a brief cable-car ride to a monument known as the Niederwalddenkmal. The central figure of this monument, at just over thirty-four feet in height, is a female figure said to represent the German nation. By what name is this figure known? Hint


Question 4 of 20
4. Looking southwards from Niederwalddenkmal and across the Rhine towards the city of Bingen-am-Rhein, our eyes are drawn toward a small tower built on an island in the middle of the river. Legend tells of the gruesome end of a Bishop of Mainz here. How did he meet his fate? Hint


Question 5 of 20
5. As we contemplate the fate of Hatto, our eyes are again drawn to a castle on the far bank. Legend has it that the builder of this castle, Reichenstein, was tricked of his payment by the wife of the noble that the castle was built for. Who was the unfortunate builder of Reichenstein? Hint


Question 6 of 20
6. On our journey we shall be passing many old buildings, some inhabited and some total ruins. Known in German as a 'Schloß' or 'Schloss', many of us refer to these buildings as palaces but what does the word 'Schloss' more accurately mean? Hint


Question 7 of 20
7. As we head in a north-westerly direction following the bends of the river, we pass the ruins of Ehrenfels and Plixholz castles before reaching our first waypoint at Lorch. Taking in the view from Lorch and looking once again to the far bank of the river we see the town of Trechtingshausen watched over by the 11th century sentinels of Reichenstein, a castle we've seen already, and Sooneck Castles. What was the 'profession' of the original occupants of these castles? Hint


Question 8 of 20
8. Leaving Lorch, the next stage of our walk takes us just over eight miles to the small town of Kaub. Our path takes us uphill through dense forest of Oak and Beech with fabulous views through the trees across the river to the town of Bacharach and of Stahleck Castle. As we descend rapidly again to the town of Kaub, another building catches our eye, a toll house built on a small island in the river at a crossing point used by which Prussian on his way to fight a great battle? Hint


Question 9 of 20
9. As we pass Kaub we begin the climb to the highlight of our walk. The Rheinsteig rises steeply here and takes us to a plateau at a height of four hundred feet or so above the mighty river. In 1824, the German poet Heinrich Heine wrote: "The loveliest maiden is sitting, up there, so wondrously fair, her golden jewelry is glist'ning, she combs her golden hair". Of which local legend was he writing? Hint


Question 10 of 20
10. It is here at Lorelei that the Rhine is at its narrowest between Switzerland and the North Sea.


Question 11 of 20
11. Descending from Lorelei, we have arrived above the pretty town of St. Goarshausen, and the view from here in front of Castle Katz is breathtaking. Across the river, dominating the valley and standing above the small town of St. Goar, is the largest and most imposing of all the Rhine Castles. By what name is this towering 'Burg' known? Hint


Question 12 of 20
12. It is here at St. Goarshausen that we need to stop for food and a good night's rest. We indulge ourselves with a hearty meal of bratwurst, potato salad and sauerkraut in the restaurant at our typical, family run hostelry. What word should you look for when searching for accommodation like this? Hint


Question 13 of 20
13. Early the following morning, now refreshed, we leave the Gasthaus for the next stage in our journey which takes us just a few short miles to a castle officially known as Schloß Thurnberg. Because of this castle's close proximity to Castle Katz, and the local people believing that the occupants were spying on each other, this gave rise to the unofficial name that the castle has today. By what name do the local people refer to Thurnberg?

Answer: (One Word ... Animal that is Tom's nemesis)
Question 14 of 20
14. From Castle Maus, the Rheinsteig takes us on for a further seven miles through the Pulsbachklamm Gorge to the town of Kestert. Continuing from here to our next overnight stop at Osterspai, we take the steep ascent to the twin castles of Sterrenberg and Liebenstein with their panoramic views of the Rhine's close bends and the western bank town of Boppard. Tales were told, over the centuries, of disputes between the owners of the twin castles in front of us which resulted in the collective name that they hold today. What name is given to these buildings? Hint


Question 15 of 20
15. The following morning we begin one of the shortest sections of our trek, the seven miles to the town of Braubach. This takes us past the castle known as Marksburg which is of particular interest to us. Judging by what we have seen of many of the castles on our journey so far, Marksburg is, indeed, a remarkable building in that it is the only Rhine castle never to have been completely destroyed... Is this statement true or false?


Question 16 of 20
16. Now, looking west across the river from Marksburg, our attention is held by an area of open ground that contains a building, the like of which we have not seen on our journey thus far. Clearly this building is not a castle but it was still important in its own right and was the site upon which German kings would swear their oaths of allegiance as they travelled to Aachen and their coronation. Named the 'Königsstuhl' in German, how does this translate into English? Hint


Question 17 of 20
17. After pausing briefly for a glass of beer and a snack at Braubach, we embark on the next and final leg of our journey. For five miles we pass along the Rheinsteig which takes us away from the Rhine itself, and which leads us to the banks of which tributary? Hint


Question 18 of 20
18. We travel in a westerly direction, only a short distance along the southern bank of this river, to the town of Lahnstein. We are now almost at the end of our trek and in Lahnstein we visit the Castle Lahneck. It was here in 1851 that a tragic event occurred that made Castle Lahneck infamous. A young lady from Scotland climbed the castle tower and, after she had reached the very top, the old wooden staircase collapsed behind her. What became of this poor unfortunate girl? Hint


Question 19 of 20
19. The final eight miles of our journey involves a strenuous ascent through the Rupertsklamm, a steep gorge which leads us up to a wonderful panoramic view from the 'Lichterkopf', from where we can look back and trace the route that we have taken so far. Descending from here down to the banks of the Rhine through the Bienhorntal we arrive at the riverbank and look across the Rhine to its confluence at Koblenz with which other great German river?

Answer: (One Word, begins with M, 5 or 7 letters)
Question 20 of 20
20. Although we have now arrived at the end of our journey here at Koblenz, the Rheinsteig itself continues for a further 34 miles to its eventual end at the city that was once the capital of the Federal Republic of Germany. This city was also the birthplace of one of the world's greatest and best loved composers, Ludwig van Beethoven. Which city is this? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. We meet to begin our journey at a Weinstube, or wine tavern, on the narrow alley in Rüdesheim-am-Rhein, famous across the world for the quality of the foods and drink on offer here. True or false: this alley is named Unter den Linden?

Answer: False

This alley is called Drosselgasse, and was built during the 15th century. Drosselgasse is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Rüdesheim and is the centre of a vibrant community. Some of the finest restaurants in the whole of Germany can be found in Drosselgasse, and there is nothing comparable to a glass of the local wine whilst sitting outside on a balmy summer evening. Unter den Linden is the name of a tree lined boulevard in the Mitte district of Berlin.

The word 'linden' is German for 'lime', and it is from the rows of lime trees planted along the edges of this thoroughfare that it takes its name.
2. Before we leave Rüdesheim-am-Rhein for the twelve mile hike along the footpath known as the Rheinsteig to the pretty town of Lorch, we visit a distillery that produces a fine brandwein, or brandy. What is the name of this world famous spirit?

Answer: Asbach-Uralt

The Asbach-Uralt distillery was founded in Rüdesheim in 1892 and became very popular amongst the Germans almost immediately. It was, in fact, so popular that in 1917 the German government prevented the sale of Asbach to the general populace in order that they could guarantee supplies to the imperial navy! After the First World War, the Treaty of Versailles prevented Germany from using the term cognac to describe Asbach, as they had been doing until that time, and so Hugo Asbach the founder coined the term 'Weinbrand', which eventually made its way into law and is still used to provide legal protection for Asbach itself and other fine German brandies.
3. The climb to the start of the Rheinsteig involves a short walk or a brief cable-car ride to a monument known as the Niederwalddenkmal. The central figure of this monument, at just over thirty-four feet in height, is a female figure said to represent the German nation. By what name is this figure known?

Answer: Germania

This imposing monument dominates the skyline above Rüdesheim, and was built to commemorate the foundation of Germany during the latter years of the 19th century. The monument itself consists of the central figure of Germania flanked by two other figures that represent war and peace. Around the pedestal are inscribed the words of the greatest patriotic folk hymn of the period, 'Die Wacht am Rhein' or 'The Watch on the Rhine', that was written sometime during the early 1840s.
4. Looking southwards from Niederwalddenkmal and across the Rhine towards the city of Bingen-am-Rhein, our eyes are drawn toward a small tower built on an island in the middle of the river. Legend tells of the gruesome end of a Bishop of Mainz here. How did he meet his fate?

Answer: Eaten alive by vermin

Bishop Hatto, Bishop of Mainz, was a thoroughly despicable fellow... or so this legend tells us. During a period of great famine, this greedy and selfish churchman confiscated the regions stocks of corn and hoarded it to sell at vastly inflated prices.

He became tired of visits to his palace by the starving and so, one day, he enticed the population of a village into a huge barn with a promise of free corn. Once they were inside Bishop Hatto had the barn secured and set ablaze, burning its occupants alive. Ignoring their screams of agony, the bishop laughed and returned to his palace. Shortly afterwards, his guards raced to tell the bishop that a hoard of mice was rushing towards the palace.

The mice overran and killed the bishop's soldiers forcing the bishop to flee to the tower that he had built on an island in the Rhine for safety.

This was to no avail as the mice swam across the river to the tower and after pouring through the windows and doors, ate Bishop Hatto alive... A fitting end for an evil tyrant! And that, fellow traveller, is the reason that this tower is known as Mäuseturm, The Mouse Tower.
5. As we contemplate the fate of Hatto, our eyes are again drawn to a castle on the far bank. Legend has it that the builder of this castle, Reichenstein, was tricked of his payment by the wife of the noble that the castle was built for. Who was the unfortunate builder of Reichenstein?

Answer: Satan

In this tale, a powerful nobleman has inherited a mountain and wishes to build an impregnable castle at its peak. After many failed attempts the frustrated noble calls upon Satan for help. Satan appears and promises to build his castle for him on condition that once completed he can possess the soul of the first living being that looks out from a castle window.

The noble agrees and the following morning his castle is there for all to see. The noble, unbeknown to Satan, had told his wife of Satan's plans and, wily woman that she was, had an idea of her own.

The noble and his retinue marched into the castle with his wife leading the way mounted on a donkey. Once inside the castle the noble's wife covered the donkeys head with a shawl and pushed the creature's head through one of the window openings. Satan, on seeing this immediately swept away his prize only to drop it as the donkey let loose a mighty bellow. With this Satan disappeared screaming in a sulphurous cloud with the howls of laughter from the local populace ringing in his ears!
6. On our journey we shall be passing many old buildings, some inhabited and some total ruins. Known in German as a 'Schloß' or 'Schloss', many of us refer to these buildings as palaces but what does the word 'Schloss' more accurately mean?

Answer: Castle, Keep or Chateau

There are a total of forty seven castles and ruins along the banks of the Rhine between Rüdesheim-am-Rhein and Koblenz. The term Schloss denotes a building more like a French chateau, a large, grand house with a lesser degree of fortification than a castle.

The most accurate name for the more heavily defended castle-type building is 'Burg'. A very heavily defended building should be described as a 'Festung' or fortress. If the building in question is at the pinnacle of a hill or mountain then it is often referred to as a 'Stein' or 'Fels'.
7. As we head in a north-westerly direction following the bends of the river, we pass the ruins of Ehrenfels and Plixholz castles before reaching our first waypoint at Lorch. Taking in the view from Lorch and looking once again to the far bank of the river we see the town of Trechtingshausen watched over by the 11th century sentinels of Reichenstein, a castle we've seen already, and Sooneck Castles. What was the 'profession' of the original occupants of these castles?

Answer: Robber Barons

Many of the castles along this stretch of the Rhine were built by members of the nobility back in the 11th and 12th centuries, and this area has become famous for its 'robber barons'. If the truth were known, fewer of these castles were inhabited by robber barons than we might believe. Due to the geography of the area, most cargo of any value was transported on the river itself, even that far back in time, and so taxes would have been paid at, or on, the river itself.

As far as historians can say, there were only two locations on this stretch of the Rhine that were originally built for this purpose, one being the Mäuseturm near Bingen-am-Rhein, and the other was the Pfalzgrafenstein at Kaub.
8. Leaving Lorch, the next stage of our walk takes us just over eight miles to the small town of Kaub. Our path takes us uphill through dense forest of Oak and Beech with fabulous views through the trees across the river to the town of Bacharach and of Stahleck Castle. As we descend rapidly again to the town of Kaub, another building catches our eye, a toll house built on a small island in the river at a crossing point used by which Prussian on his way to fight a great battle?

Answer: Blücher

The Pfalzgrafenstein Toll Station at Kaub collected taxes on the river in league with the inhabitants of Castle Gutenfels and the fortified town of Kaub. It was built in 1326 on Falkenau Island by King Ludwig the Bavarian, and operated as a toll station until as late as 1867. Pfalzgrafenstein, known simply as 'The Pfalz', stands at the point on the river at which, in 1814, the Prussian Field Marshall Blücher crossed the Rhine with his army on the way to fight against Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo.

In Kaub there is the Blüchermuseum which is well worth a visit. After World War II, the building became the property of the state of Rhineland-Pfalz, was restored to its former glory, and became a museum itself that can be reached by ferry boat provided that river and weather conditions suitable.
9. As we pass Kaub we begin the climb to the highlight of our walk. The Rheinsteig rises steeply here and takes us to a plateau at a height of four hundred feet or so above the mighty river. In 1824, the German poet Heinrich Heine wrote: "The loveliest maiden is sitting, up there, so wondrously fair, her golden jewelry is glist'ning, she combs her golden hair". Of which local legend was he writing?

Answer: Lorelei

Lorelei was a beautiful water nymph. The son of the Count of Palatinate, Ronald, had heard tales of this beautiful maiden and determined to have her for himself. One day, on the pretence of leaving court to go hunting, he had a local boatman row him across to the base of the cliff upon which Lorelei sang her enchanting song. So enamored of Lorelei he dived into the fast flowing river to go to her and drowned. The Count, on hearing of his son's death, demanded that Lorelei be brought before him dead or alive. Four warriors sailed the following day to kill Lorelei. As they crept up the steep cliff to kill her Lorelei called upon her father, The Rhine, to rescue her. Suddenly from out of the Rhine two horses sprang from the foam and carried Lorelei away into the river and the body of Ronald was returned upon the shores of the river.

"The Lorelei has vanished, but her charm still remains. Thou canst find it, O Wanderer, in the eyes of the maidens near the Rhine. It blooms on their cheeks, it lingers on their rosy lips, there thou wilt find its traces. Arm thy heart, steel thy will, blindfold thine eye!" (Wilhelm Ruland)
10. It is here at Lorelei that the Rhine is at its narrowest between Switzerland and the North Sea.

Answer: True

Here, the Rhine is only 134 yards wide and of interest at this point is a system of lights known as the 'Wahrschau' which controls shipping for the three mile stretch of river between St Goar and Oberwesel. Due to particularly steep cliffs, tight bends and dangerous currents at this point in the river's course, it has proved to be very difficult to install a reliable radio warning system and line-of-sight navigation is especially fraught with danger.

The system consists of a number of radar stations that feed live pictures to monitors at the system headquarters in Oberwesel.

It is from this station that the lookout observes the entire stretch of the river and controls the light system. Strangely, the Wahrschau only applies to vessels between 62m and 150m in length.

It appears that smaller vessels are permitted to come and go as they please!
11. Descending from Lorelei, we have arrived above the pretty town of St. Goarshausen, and the view from here in front of Castle Katz is breathtaking. Across the river, dominating the valley and standing above the small town of St. Goar, is the largest and most imposing of all the Rhine Castles. By what name is this towering 'Burg' known?

Answer: Burg Rheinfels

This imposing building was founded in around 1245 and was home to the Counts of Katzenelnbogen until 1479 when it became the property of the state of Hesse. The castle withstood an assault by the armies of French king Louis XIV during the War of the Grand Alliance only to fall just over one hundred years later to French revolutionary forces.

After its partial destruction, material from Rheinfels was used to construct the fortress of Ehrenbreitstein near Koblenz. In 1834 Burg Rheinfels was acquired by the Prussians who began a period of restoration, not only of this castle but of the entire Rhine Gorge area.

The town of Saint Goar has owned the building since 1925 and it is now home to one of the finest hotels in all Germany. For those who aren't claustrophobic, a visit to Burg Rheinfels cannot be complete without a scramble through its extensive network of underground passages!
12. It is here at St. Goarshausen that we need to stop for food and a good night's rest. We indulge ourselves with a hearty meal of bratwurst, potato salad and sauerkraut in the restaurant at our typical, family run hostelry. What word should you look for when searching for accommodation like this?

Answer: Gasthaus

Fortunately for speakers of English, it is not too difficult to understand many words of German and 'Gasthaus' simply translates as 'Guesthouse'. A 'Schnellimbiss' or 'Schnellimbiß', sometimes shortened and anglicised to 'Schnelly', is a fast food outlet.

Many towns and cities in Germany possess a hostel that is run by the 'Jugendherberge', indeed there are somewhere in the region of 550 hostels scattered over the country. The accommodation in these hostels is very good; clean warm and comfortable and where one can obtain excellent food.

The word 'Pension', a French word for a guesthouse, can be found in Germany, especially in those regions that lie close to the border with France.
13. Early the following morning, now refreshed, we leave the Gasthaus for the next stage in our journey which takes us just a few short miles to a castle officially known as Schloß Thurnberg. Because of this castle's close proximity to Castle Katz, and the local people believing that the occupants were spying on each other, this gave rise to the unofficial name that the castle has today. By what name do the local people refer to Thurnberg?

Answer: Maus

Cat and Mouse... Who says that the Germans have no sense of humour? The construction of Thurnberg was started in 1353 and was completed in 1388. One of the most technically advanced castle designs of its time, Thurnberg was a favourite residence of the Electors of Trier. Thurnberg is open to members of the public containing, as it does, many examples of fine furniture dating back many centuries. Castle Katz, or Neu-Katzenelnbogen, was built by the Counts of Katzenelnbogen during the 14th century, with work finishing in around 1370.

Unfortunately, Katz Castle is a private residence and is closed to the public. However, a section of this impressive building has been converted into another fine hotel.
14. From Castle Maus, the Rheinsteig takes us on for a further seven miles through the Pulsbachklamm Gorge to the town of Kestert. Continuing from here to our next overnight stop at Osterspai, we take the steep ascent to the twin castles of Sterrenberg and Liebenstein with their panoramic views of the Rhine's close bends and the western bank town of Boppard. Tales were told, over the centuries, of disputes between the owners of the twin castles in front of us which resulted in the collective name that they hold today. What name is given to these buildings?

Answer: The Hostile Brothers

These castles are not, in effect, two entirely separate buildings. Construction work on Castle Liebenstein was started during the 13th century and this castle was intended to act as a bulwark, or forecastle, to Castle Sterrenberg. There is no historic evidence that the occupants of either castle took up arms against each other, although tales of such started to appear at around the end of the 16th century. During the 1970s restoration works to return Sterrenberg Castle to its medieval condition took place and the Castle is now owned and run by the organisation, "Burgen, Schlösser, Altertümer Rhineland-Palatinate". Castle Liebenstein is now run as a luxury hotel.
15. The following morning we begin one of the shortest sections of our trek, the seven miles to the town of Braubach. This takes us past the castle known as Marksburg which is of particular interest to us. Judging by what we have seen of many of the castles on our journey so far, Marksburg is, indeed, a remarkable building in that it is the only Rhine castle never to have been completely destroyed... Is this statement true or false?

Answer: False

Marksburg Castle along with the Pfalzgrafenstein at Kaub are the only two castles within the Rhine Gorge that have never been destroyed. Marksburg, which sits atop the hill immediately behind Braubach, is a monument of national importance within Germany as it remains in its complete and original state as it was when built during the 14th century. Marksburg possesses the highest levels of protection. Marksburg is open to the public and inside can be found an original medieval knights hall, an armoury and wine cellar.

It is also possible to walk around the castle battlements and the turret rooms.
16. Now, looking west across the river from Marksburg, our attention is held by an area of open ground that contains a building, the like of which we have not seen on our journey thus far. Clearly this building is not a castle but it was still important in its own right and was the site upon which German kings would swear their oaths of allegiance as they travelled to Aachen and their coronation. Named the 'Königsstuhl' in German, how does this translate into English?

Answer: Royal Chair

The 'Königsstuhl', or more accurately 'Königsstuhl von Rhens', is a two-storey stone building, an octagonal platform raised upon nine pillars and was the site upon which German kings would swear their oaths of allegiance as they travelled to Aachen for their coronations.

The Royal Chair that we see today however, is not the original, but a rebuilding that took place in 1842, the ancient monument that was standing on the site was destroyed in 1795.
17. After pausing briefly for a glass of beer and a snack at Braubach, we embark on the next and final leg of our journey. For five miles we pass along the Rheinsteig which takes us away from the Rhine itself, and which leads us to the banks of which tributary?

Answer: Lahn

The Lahn is an important tributary of the Rhine that rises in the Sauerland and passes through the states of North-Rhine Westphalia, Hesse and the Rhineland-Palatinate before joining the Rhine a few miles to the south of Koblenz. The Lahn has a course of 153 miles as it descends by one thousand and seven hundred feet through a total of twenty three lock complexes and two tunnel systems before joining with the Rhine.

The waters of the Lahn are also used to generate electricity with there being a total of 19 facilities operating along its length.

The Lahn is a popular waterway for pleasure boating above the city of Gießen and the middle Lahn valley itself has become one of the largest nature reserves in the state of Hesse.
18. We travel in a westerly direction, only a short distance along the southern bank of this river, to the town of Lahnstein. We are now almost at the end of our trek and in Lahnstein we visit the Castle Lahneck. It was here in 1851 that a tragic event occurred that made Castle Lahneck infamous. A young lady from Scotland climbed the castle tower and, after she had reached the very top, the old wooden staircase collapsed behind her. What became of this poor unfortunate girl?

Answer: She died from thirst in the tower

The castle at Lahneck was built for the Archbishop of Mainz and was completed in around 1244. It became severely damaged during the Thirty Years War and was left uninhabited until the unfortunate event in 1851 which led to its partial rebuilding in 1852. In June 1851, seventeen year old Idilia Dubb starved to death at the top of the tower after the old wooden stairs had collapsed. Because of the 12 foot high walls around the top of the tower he cries for help could not be heard and she slowly succumbed to thirst and starvation whilst all the while recording her experience in her diary. Her remains were discovered many years later in 1860 and her diary was discovered within the walls a few weeks after her discovery.

"All I know is that there is no hope for me. My death is certain... Father in heaven, have mercy upon my soul"... These were the last words in her diary followed by a sketch of two hearts. A tragic story indeed.
19. The final eight miles of our journey involves a strenuous ascent through the Rupertsklamm, a steep gorge which leads us up to a wonderful panoramic view from the 'Lichterkopf', from where we can look back and trace the route that we have taken so far. Descending from here down to the banks of the Rhine through the Bienhorntal we arrive at the riverbank and look across the Rhine to its confluence at Koblenz with which other great German river?

Answer: Mosel

It is at Koblenz, 'The Deutsche Eck' or 'German Corner' that the Rhine meets the Mosel or Moselle. The Mosel is another major tributary that feeds into the Rhine and is most famous for its wine. The south banks of the Mosel, almost permanently bathed in warm sunshine during the growing season, produce some of Germany's finest wines.

The Mosel has its source in the Vosges Mountains, a highland region that straddles the border between France and Germany. The river valley forms a natural separation between the Eifel and Hunsruck mountain ranges. With a total length of just short of 340 miles, the Mosel flows through the cities of Metz in France, Schengen and Grevenmacher in Luxembourg and Trier and Cochem in Germany before joining the Rhine.
20. Although we have now arrived at the end of our journey here at Koblenz, the Rheinsteig itself continues for a further 34 miles to its eventual end at the city that was once the capital of the Federal Republic of Germany. This city was also the birthplace of one of the world's greatest and best loved composers, Ludwig van Beethoven. Which city is this?

Answer: Bonn

From 1949 until 1990, Bonn was the capital of West Germany and holds a unique title, that of 'Bundesstadt' or 'Federal City'. Bonn was selected as the new capital of West Germany by the country's first post-war Chancellor, Konrad Adenauer, and was only considered to be the temporary capital until the return of this status to Berlin which lay within the sphere of soviet influence at that time. Ludwig van Beethoven is, without doubt, Bonn's most famous son being born there in 1770. Beethoven is the composer of some of the western world's most famous pieces of music and by the time of his death in Vienna, Austria on the 26th of March 1827, he had produced thirty-two piano sonatas, sixteen string quartets, nine symphonies and numerous other choral works and songs, all in spite of being profoundly deaf for the last few decades of his life.
Source: Author SisterSeagull

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