Quiz about Locomotive Cuisine
Quiz about Locomotive Cuisine

Locomotive Cuisine Trivia Quiz


The wonderful thing about a train journey is that you get to experience the local cuisine while watching the world go by. Let's go on a journey on some of the world's most famous trains and explore their country's traditional fare.

A multiple-choice quiz by KayceeKool. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
KayceeKool
Time
3 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
410,131
Updated
Nov 23 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
238
Last 3 plays: sarahpplayer (9/10), misterpants (9/10), Tisser (4/10).
Author's Note: Please note that many dishes and beverages have become global. This quiz refers to the country where the dishes would be considered local or where they originated.
1. It might be a bit early in the day, but which French delicacies might I be offered for breakfast while travelling on the LGV Méditerranée? Hint

Croissants and champagne
Poutine and maple syrup
Black pudding and oatmeal
Hash browns and grits

2. On the The Ghan travelling between Adelaide and Darwin, morning or afternoon tea could include which sweet treats? Hint

Tiramisu and biscotti
Trifle and Eton mess
Baklava and awakdu
Lamingtons and pavlova

3. As the Shangri-La Express journeys across the vast expanse of China, brunch or a mid-morning snack could consist of dim sum and tea.

True
False

4. As the Blue Train passes the Big Hole at Kimberley, what traditional South African fare could I be offered for lunch? Hint

Cucumber sandwiches and Earl Grey tea
Moules and frites
Babotie and Pinotage
Bratwurst and sauerkraut

5. While travelling on the aptly named Glacier Express between Zermatt and St Moritz, what local delicacies could I be offered while I take in the Alpine scenery? Hint

Curry and rice
Fondue and Rivella
Smorgasbord
Boxty and colcannon

6. On board the Andean Explorer, one of the world's highest train routes, which Peruvian cuisine might be on the menu? Hint

Ceviche and Pisco Sour
Conch Soup and Red Stripe
Feijoada and Caipirinha
Ropa Vieja and Mojito

7. After visiting the Red Fort at Jaipur as part of my trip on the Maharajah's Express, what local food might be on the dinner menu? Hint

Som Tao and Singha Beer
Murgh Makhani and Lassi
Dal Bat and Tongba
Roast Beef and Stout

8. While surveying the wide open spaces of Alaska on board the Denali Star Express, which local dishes could I enjoy?

Clam Chowder and cornbread
Halibut Caddy Ganty and Akutaq

9. Orkroshka and Blini are examples of local cuisine that could be served on the Trans-Siberian Express.

True
False

10. On a trip round Kyushu island on the Kyushu Seven Stars, which dishes would make up a traditional Japanese meal? Hint

Pho and Cao Lau
Hakata Ramen and Sake
Pasta and Chianti
Nasi Goreng and satay


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. It might be a bit early in the day, but which French delicacies might I be offered for breakfast while travelling on the LGV Méditerranée?

Answer: Croissants and champagne

Part of France's famed high speed train network, the LGV Mediterranee services the 250 kilometre route between Marseilles and Nimes. This gives a passenger time partake of one of the culinary delights of France, a freshly baked croissant. Croissants are the crescent shaped, buttery and flaky pastries that are oh, so delightful. They are made from yeast leavened dough that is rolled thinly, layered with butter and then folded into shape and baked. The steam created by the butter melting during cooking gives them the light, flaky texture that is so characteristic of the pastry.

What could be better than a fresh croissant for breakfast? One, of course, that is accompanied by a chilled glass of one of France's most famous contributions to the world of fine dining, Champagne. Champagne is the sparkling wine that is produced in the Champagne region in northern France. To be able to attach the 'appellation' champagne to your wine, you have to conform to very strict guidelines. These include where the grapes are sourced from, the way they are pressed and to the fact that the bubbles must be produced by a secondary fermentation in the bottle as opposed to adding outside carbonation. A classic champagne usually includes a blend of three varietals, pinot noir, pinot meunier and chardonnay. Famous champagne producers include Moet en Chandon, Bollinger and Tattinger.
2. On the The Ghan travelling between Adelaide and Darwin, morning or afternoon tea could include which sweet treats?

Answer: Lamingtons and pavlova

The Ghan is the luxury Australian passenger train that runs through the centre of Australia from the south coast at Adelaide to the north coast city of Darwin. The four and half day journey gives plenty of opportunities to sample an iconic Australian dish or two. If you are a lover of sponge cake, chocolate and coconut, then lamingtons are for you. There is much controversy in Australia as to the history and composition of lamingtons, so much so that Maurice French, an Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Queensland, wrote a whole book on the subject called "The Lamington Enigma". The usual recipe calls for squares of butter or sponge cake, rolled in chocolate and then coated with desiccated coconut. The first printed recipe for "lamington cake" was published in the "Queensland Country Life" issue of 17 December 1900 and it was named either after the governor of Queensland, Lord Lamington, or his wife. What is certain, is that this delicious treat has become an Australian favourite, so much so that 21 July every year has been designated National Lamington Day.

Pavlova is the delicious combination of slow baked crunchy meringue with a moist centre that is then topped with sweetened whipped cream and fresh seasonal fruit. It is so good that its creation has been claimed by both Australia and New Zealand. The exact time and place of that creation is a hotly debated question in both countries. What is known that it was created in honour of the famous Russian ballerina, Anna Pavlova, in the 1920s during one of her tours of the region. What is also certain is that this dessert has become a firm favourite and is regarded as a national dish by both countries.
3. As the Shangri-La Express journeys across the vast expanse of China, brunch or a mid-morning snack could consist of dim sum and tea.

Answer: True

Chinese legend holds that tea originated in 2732 BC by the Emperor Shen Nong when the leaves of a wild tree blew into a pot of boiling water in his garden. That tree was a Camellia sinensis which is native to the area and from which all tea leaves come. Tea is considered to be one of the "seven necessities" of Chinese life and is an integral part of Chinese culture. There are six different categories of tea; green, white, yellow, oolong, black and post-fermented of which green tea is the most popular and commonly found. The Chinese do not only drink tea to quench thirst, but believe that the beverage has a number of health enhancing properties.

Tea-houses sprung up where people could gather and share the beverage. It was in these venues in Guangzhou in southern China in the late 19th century that the practice of offering dim sum to accompany the tea became popular. Dim sum are small plates of different dishes which are usually shared and eaten as a mid-morning or brunch snack. These dishes are an assortment of seafood, meat and vegetables which are usually either steamed, fried or baked. Examples of the sorts of dishes on offer would be Shumai, cup shaped wraps with assorted fillings, or Xialong Bao, which are dumplings containing a hot soup. On the sweet side are Dan Ta, little tartlets of pastry with a custard filling.
4. As the Blue Train passes the Big Hole at Kimberley, what traditional South African fare could I be offered for lunch?

Answer: Babotie and Pinotage

The Blue Train is the luxury South African service that runs between Cape Town and Pretoria, two of South Africa's capital cities. Babotie is considered to be one of the signature dishes of South African cuisine and is a good example of the blend of different cultures that make up the rainbow nation. Babotie is a combination of ground meat, usually beef, but which can also be lamb, onion, bread soaked in milk, raisins or sultanas and a spice mix that contains curry powder, ginger and bay leaves amongst others. This is then topped with a custard made of whipped eggs and milk and baked until golden. The dish draws heavily on the influences of the Cape Malay community, although the first recipe for it appeared in a Dutch cookbook in 1609. The are as many variations as there are cooks. My personal favourite is to use coconut milk instead of cow's milk in the egg topping.

If you want to enjoy a glass of red wine with your babotie, South Africa's signature varietal, Pinotage, would provide a good accompaniment. Pinotage was created by Abraham Izak Perold, a Professor of Viticulture at the University of Stellenbosch, in 1925. He crossed the robust and hardy Cinsaut (or Hermitage, as it was then known in South Africa) with the more delicate and temperamental Pinot noir. This cross produced a very dark, almost black grape, that creates a deep red wine with a signature nose. After initial resistance from the global wine community, Pinotage made a breakthrough when the Kanonkop Pinotage won the Robert Mondavi Trophy for Best Red Wine at the 1991 International Wine and Spirits Competition in London. October 2 is designated Pinotage Day in South Africa.
5. While travelling on the aptly named Glacier Express between Zermatt and St Moritz, what local delicacies could I be offered while I take in the Alpine scenery?

Answer: Fondue and Rivella

The Glacier Express is known as the world's slowest express, taking about eight hours to cover the 271 kilometres between the Swiss ski resorts of Zermatt and St Moritz. This gives plenty of time then to tuck into a cheese fondue, the iconic dish of Switzerland. The traditional cheese fondue consists melted cheese, wine and spices that is cooked over a small stove on the table in a communal pot. Various items such as bread, potatoes or vegetables are then dipped into the mixture with long skewer like forks. The first recipe for "kass mit wein du kocken" can be found in a 1699 book published in Zurich. However, it was the Swiss Cheese Union's campaign in the 1930s to promote cheese use by declaring that Cheese Fondue was Switzerland's national dish that made it famous. Traditionally Swiss cheeses such as Gruyere and Emmentaler are used, but there are many variations depending on the cook and the region. Hands up those you whose kitchenware has included a fondue set.

To accompany your fondue you could order a Rivella, the famous Swiss lightly sparking soft drink that is one of the most popular drinks in the country. Rivella was concocted by Robert Barth in 1952 when he adapted a beer recipe to produce a non-alcoholic drink. Rivella consists of water, milk whey and caramelised sugar along with various flavourings and stabilisers. The original drink was called Rivella Red. In 1959 a low calorie version named Rivella Blue followed. Rivella has become the national beverage of Switzerland and is second only to Coca-Cola in sales. If you are feeling adventurous, you could order a Bunder Rivella, a cocktail that combines Rivella and Roteli, the Swiss liqueur made from dried cherries and spices.
6. On board the Andean Explorer, one of the world's highest train routes, which Peruvian cuisine might be on the menu?

Answer: Ceviche and Pisco Sour

The Andean Explorer travels through the Peruvian Andes between Cusco, the ancient capital of the Incas, via Lake Titicaca to the World Heritage site of Arequipa. This provides a perfect opportunity to sit in the observation car and take in the breathtaking scenery while sipping a Pisco Sour, the cocktail that is the national drink of Peru. The Peruvians take this drink so seriously that is one of the designated "Productos Bandera del Peru" which is defined as "a collection of products of Peruvian origin that are closely associated with the image of Peru in the world". A Pisco Sour is made from Peruvian Pisca, which is a distilled spirit similar to Grappa, that is made from Peruvian grown aguardiente grapes. It has to be Peruvian Pisca as Chile also claims the Pisco Sour as their national drink when made from Chilean Pisca and a dispute still rages between the two countries. Added to the Pisca are freshly squeezed lemon juice, sugar syrup, ice, eggs white and Angostura Bitters. The Pisco Sour is so popular in Peru that, from 2003, the first Saturday of February is designated as National Pisco Sour Day.

To accompany your Pisca Sour, you might like to try one of the quintessential Peruvian dishes, Ceviche. Ceviche is thought to date back to Incan times. Indeed the name comes from the Quechan word "siwichi" means tender or fresh fish. Ceviche is a dish of fresh cubed seafood which is "cooked" by marinating the raw fish in citrus juice, normally lemon or lime. The acid in the citrus juice changes the proteins in the fish from clear to opaque, thus "cooking" the fish without any need for heat. Added to the marinated fish in the Peruvian recipe is 'aji' which are small fiery chilies, coriander or cilantro and slivered red onion and spices to taste. Ceviche can be eaten as an appetizer or as a main course where is usually accompanied by cooked sweet potatoes or corn.
7. After visiting the Red Fort at Jaipur as part of my trip on the Maharajah's Express, what local food might be on the dinner menu?

Answer: Murgh Makhani and Lassi

The Mahrarjah's Express is one of the world's must luxurious trains that offers trips on four different routes across north western and central India. These all give ample opportunity to sample some the cuisine for which India is justly famous. One of the most well known Indian dishes that originated in northern India is Murgh Makhani or butter chicken. As with all dishes, there are numerous different versions of how this dish originated, but what it is agreed is that it was created by Kundan Lal Gujral, a chef from Punjab, who moved his family to Delhi after the Partition of India in 1947 and opened an eatery called Moti Mahal. There are many different recipes for butter chicken, but simply, the dish consists of chicken pieces that have been marinated in lemon juice, yoghurt, chili, garam marsala and garlic and ginger paste. To this is added tomato puree, onion and either cream or melted butter. The chicken is then placed in a tandoor, a traditional clay oven, until cooked and a rich, thick buttery sauce remains. It is usually accompanied by basmati rice, poppadoms or fresh naan bread.

Lassi is the traditional yoghurt based drink that is also thought to have originated in Punjab, but which is now very popular throughout the Indian sub-continent. Traditional Lassi consists of yoghurt curd that is mixed with either milk or water to which is added flavourings of choice. Lassi can either be sweet or salty depending on what is introduced to the basic drink. Traditionally it was made by mixing the ingredients in a wooden churner called a mathari. Mint lassi which a variation to which salt and lemon mint are added make a cool and refreshing drink to accompany the rich and spicy Murgh Makhani.
8. While surveying the wide open spaces of Alaska on board the Denali Star Express, which local dishes could I enjoy?

Answer: Halibut Caddy Ganty and Akutaq

The Denali Star Express is the flagship train of Alaskan Railroad and runs daily from Anchorage to Fairbanks through the Denali National Park. The 12 hour journey gives the traveller the opportunity to taste some of the local Alaskan cuisine. An ideal lunch dish that takes advantage of the abundance of fresh fish in Alaska, is Halibut Caddy Ganty. As far as can be ascertained, the dish was created in the 1920s in the small town of Pelican, Alaska by (wait for it) Caddy Ganty, a fish packer's wife. It consists of fresh halibut pieces that are marinated in white wine before being rolled in breadcrumbs and baked. It is topped by a sauce made of sour cream, mayonnaise, minced onion and paprika. There are various versions of the recipe, but the most famous is the one used by Jo-Ann and David Lesh, owners of the Gustavus Inn near Glacier Bay. This one garnered an American Classics award in 2010 from the prestigious James Beard Foundation.

To follow your Halibut Caddy Ganty, you might like to partake of a portion of Akutaq which is pronounced "ah-goo-duck". This is an ancient and traditional Inuit recipe that is also sometimes known as Eskimo Ice-Cream. It doesn't actually contain any ice-cream, but is a mixture of animal fat, meat and berries that is hand whipped until it is light and fluffy. The word "Akutaq" means "to mix together". This is one of those recipes where there are as many variations as there are cooks, depending on location and availability of ingredients. Recipes were never actually written out, but were handed down through the generations. The most commonly found recipe is made of moose or caribou meat that has been pulverised and blended with moose fat and whatever fresh berries are available. In some recipes, fresh snow is added to the mixture.
9. Orkroshka and Blini are examples of local cuisine that could be served on the Trans-Siberian Express.

Answer: True

Running for 9,289 kilometres across the world's largest country, the Trans-Siberian Express links Moscow in European Russia to Vladivostok in the far east of the country. This journey takes eight days which gives passengers ample opportunity to sample some of the cuisine the country has to offer. A good choice for lunch would be a bowl of Okroshka, the chilled soup that originated in the country's Volga region. The traditional soup is made from diced raw vegetables such as cucumber, radishes or spring onions to which can be added some form of meat, boiled potatoes and hard boiled egg. Just before serving, this base is then covered in kvass, the fizzy, lightly alcoholic beverage that is made from fermented black or rye bread. The soup is then finished off with a dollop of smetana or soured cream. the name of the soup comes from the Russian word "kroshitj" which means to "crumble into small pieces".

While on board, you could also try some blinis, the round, very thin pancakes that are one of the most popular foods in Russia. Their origin is thought to date back to Pre-Christianity when the pancakes were traditionally eaten after winter to celebrate the re-birth of the new sun. Their round shape was to echo that of the sun. The week before Lent is traditionally Maslentisa or Pancake Week where blinis are eaten for a week. Blinis are made from wheat flour which is leavened with yeast and left to rise before being diluted with milk. The rounds are then flattened very thinly before being cooked. These versatile treats can be savoury of sweet and stuffed with a filling of choice. One of the most popular traditional fillings is sour cream and caviar.
10. On a trip round Kyushu island on the Kyushu Seven Stars, which dishes would make up a traditional Japanese meal?

Answer: Hakata Ramen and Sake

The Kyushu Seven Stars is the luxury train that offers multi-day journeys around Japan's third largest island, Kyushu. This offer plenty of opportunity for the traveller to enjoy the local cuisine on offer. One of the signature dishes that originated in Kyushu is Hakata Ramen. It hails from Fukuoka on the island's northern shores, but has become very popular all over Japan. Hakata Ramen is a creamy white noodle soup that is made from tonkotsu or pork bones that are simmered in water until they become gelatinous. The broth is usually only flavoured with salt, soy sauce and miso, a fermented soybean paste. Before serving, the broth is then topped with chopped scallions and red pickled ginger. It is, however, the noodles used in this dish that makes it stand out. They are straight and very thin and are cooked al dente style to remain firm. In fact, only a few noodles at a time are added to the hot broth to prevent them from becoming soggy. This has led to the practice of "kaedama" which is a second helping.

There is an old saying in Japan that "sake never fights with food". This would make it a good choice to accompany Hakana Ramen and try out Japan's national drink, especially seeing as Kyushu is one of the top three wine producing regions of the country. Sake is the alcoholic beverage (it's not really a wine or a beer) that is made by fermenting a special strain of rice that has been polished to remove its outer coating, water, koji (rice mould) and yeast. The fermented liquid is then filtered before consumption. It dates back about 2500 years and is considered to be the drink of the "kami" or gods. It is usually served in an earthen or porcelain bottle called a tokkuri. The liquid is gently warmed before being poured into small cups called sakazuki. Remember to sip. Sake packs quite a punch with an alcohol content of between 14 and 16%.
Source: Author KayceeKool

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor jmorrow before going online.
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