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Quiz about Ramen  Beyond the College Dorm
Quiz about Ramen  Beyond the College Dorm

Ramen - Beyond the College Dorm Quiz


Instant ramen is a worldwide phenomenon, yet if you take the time to sit down and smell the broth at a Japanese ramen restaurant, you'll find a whole new world of amazing flavor coming your way.

A photo quiz by trident. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
trident
Time
3 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
416,695
Updated
Jun 09 24
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
74
Last 3 plays: ozzz2002 (8/10), cinnam0n (8/10), RedHook13 (9/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. Ramen is a traditional Japanese dish that finds it roots in the Chinese noodle dishes of the early 20th century. Immigrants that lived in the Chinatown of which Japanese port city (located near Tokyo) helped popularize the dish?


Question 2 of 10
2. Shoyu ramen can be found in many Japanese ramen restaurants. Which of these popular broth enhancers ("tare") is included to make the clear, dark broth? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. Many Japanese restaurants will give you the option to add "chashu" to your ramen. What kind of meat is chashu typically made from? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. The broth for this version of ramen is made specifically from pork bones, giving it a cloudy, brownish color. What kind of ramen broth is it?


Question 5 of 10
5. Named for the Naruto whirlpools of Japan, "narutomaki" is a fun, colorful ramen topping added once cooking has completed. What is the main ingredient used when making "narutomaki"? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. A specialty of Sapporo, Japan, this version of ramen uses a special soybean-based ingredient for its broth. Which of these is it? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. You may happen across the ingredient known as "menma" in Japanese when eating a bowlful of steaming ramen. Located on the righthand side of this photo, what would you be eating?


Question 8 of 10
8. When creating a ramen dish, one of the most important distinctions is whether your dish will be "chintan" or "paitan." What is the distinction that you are making when deciding on one of these two options? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. While dining at a ramen restaurant, sides such as "karaage" (deep-fried chicken) and these delicious fried dumplings might be on offer. What are these dumplings called in Japanese?


Question 10 of 10
10. Instant ramen was invented in 1958 by Momofuku Ando amidst a food shortage in post-WWII Japan. What ingredient, most commonly supplied by the United States at that time, convinced Ando to come up with his innovation? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Ramen is a traditional Japanese dish that finds it roots in the Chinese noodle dishes of the early 20th century. Immigrants that lived in the Chinatown of which Japanese port city (located near Tokyo) helped popularize the dish?

Answer: Yokohama

Ramen, a dish that has become a traditional Japanese staple through cultural suffusion, has its roots in Chinese cuisine. The word "ramen" comes from the Chinese words "la" and "mian," meaning "pulled noodles." This early version of the dish was introduced to Japan by Chinese immigrants in the late 19th century.

Yokohama's Chinatown, one of the largest and oldest in Japan, played a crucial role in popularizing ramen. Chinese restaurants in this area began serving the dish, and it quickly gained popularity among the Japanese. This became especially true during several food shortages in the aftermath of World War II.
2. Shoyu ramen can be found in many Japanese ramen restaurants. Which of these popular broth enhancers ("tare") is included to make the clear, dark broth?

Answer: soy sauce

The foundation for the broth of shoyu ramen typically includes chicken or pork bones, which are simmered for several hours to extract deep, rich flavors. Key ingredients such as garlic, ginger, and onions are often added to enhance the broth's complexity.

Soy sauce, or "shoyu" in Japanese, is the star ingredient that gives this ramen its distinctive salty and umami taste. During preparation, soy sauce is added to the simmering broth, infusing it with its characteristic flavor. The broth is then combined with wheat noodles and garnished with various toppings like sliced pork (chashu), soft-boiled eggs, nori (seaweed), bamboo shoots, and green onions.
3. Many Japanese restaurants will give you the option to add "chashu" to your ramen. What kind of meat is chashu typically made from?

Answer: pork

Chashu is a delicious and popular topping for ramen, known for being tender, flavorful slices of braised pork. The name "chashu" is derived from the Chinese "char siu," a type of barbecued pork, though the preparation methods differ. To make chashu, pork belly is commonly used due to its balance of meat and fat. The pork belly is rolled into a log shape and tied with string to maintain its shape during cooking.

It is then simmered slowly in a mixture of soy sauce, sake, mirin, sugar, and aromatics such as ginger, garlic, and scallions. This braising process infuses the meat with rich, savory flavors and makes it incredibly tender. After cooking, the chashu is typically sliced thin and served atop a bowl of ramen, adding a melt-in-your-mouth texture.
4. The broth for this version of ramen is made specifically from pork bones, giving it a cloudy, brownish color. What kind of ramen broth is it?

Answer: tonkotsu

Tonkotsu ramen is famous for its deeply flavorful pork bone broth. The preparation of the broth involves simmering pork bones, often including trotters and knuckles, for an extended period, usually 12 to 18 hours. This long simmering process breaks down the collagen and marrow in the bones, releasing gelatin and fats that create the broth's signature thick, milky consistency. The result is a luxurious broth that serves as the foundation for the ramen.

The broth is then combined with thin, firm wheat noodles and topped with a variety of ingredients like chashu (braised pork belly), soft-boiled eggs, green onions, mushrooms, and sometimes black garlic oil for an extra layer of complexity. The first time I saw tonkotsu ramen on a menu, I got it confused with the word "tonkatsu" (breaded, fried pork cutlet)!
5. Named for the Naruto whirlpools of Japan, "narutomaki" is a fun, colorful ramen topping added once cooking has completed. What is the main ingredient used when making "narutomaki"?

Answer: fish paste

Narutomaki is made primarily from white fish paste called surimi, which is created by mincing white fish like pollock or cod into a smooth paste. This paste is then mixed with egg whites and seasonings such as salt and sugar to achieve the desired consistency and flavor.

To create the pink swirl, a portion of the surimi mixture is set aside and dyed with pink food coloring. The dyed mixture is spread thinly on a sheet of plastic wrap or parchment paper. The remaining white surimi is then layered on top of the pink layer. The combined layers are rolled up tightly into a cylindrical shape, which creates the swirl pattern when sliced. The roll is steamed for about 30 minutes to cook it thoroughly, then allowed to cool before being sliced into rounds.
6. A specialty of Sapporo, Japan, this version of ramen uses a special soybean-based ingredient for its broth. Which of these is it?

Answer: miso

Miso ramen originated in Sapporo, the capital of Hokkaido, in the mid-20th century; it was a culinary innovation that adapted traditional ramen to the region's colder climate. This dish is known for its rich, savory broth made from a base of miso, a fermented soybean paste. The broth typically starts with a stock made from chicken, pork bones, or a combination of both, which is simmered for hours to extract deep flavors. To this stock, miso paste is added, providing a distinct umami taste and a slightly creamy texture.

Common ingredients in the broth also include garlic, ginger, and sesame oil for added depth. Miso ramen is usually served with medium-thick, curly noodles and topped with various ingredients such as chashu (braised pork belly), soft-boiled eggs, green onions, bean sprouts, corn, and sometimes butter, a nod to its Hokkaido roots where dairy is a local specialty.
7. You may happen across the ingredient known as "menma" in Japanese when eating a bowlful of steaming ramen. Located on the righthand side of this photo, what would you be eating?

Answer: bamboo shoots

Menma is a popular Japanese condiment made from fermented bamboo shoots. The process of making menma starts with harvesting the shoots of young bamboo plants, which are then boiled to soften them. After boiling, the bamboo shoots are fermented in a brine solution that often includes ingredients like salt, sugar, soy sauce, and sometimes chili peppers. This fermentation process not only preserves the bamboo but also gives it a unique savory and slightly tangy flavor.

Menma is most commonly used as a topping in ramen, where it adds a delightful crunch that complements the broth and other ingredients. Besides ramen, menma is also used in various other Asian dishes, such as stir-fries and salads, where it provides both texture and flavor.
8. When creating a ramen dish, one of the most important distinctions is whether your dish will be "chintan" or "paitan." What is the distinction that you are making when deciding on one of these two options?

Answer: Whether the broth is clear or opaque

In the world of ramen, the terms "chintan" and "paitan" refer to two distinct styles of broth, each offering unique characteristics and flavors. Chintan broth, meaning "clear soup" in Japanese, is known for its transparent appearance and lighter flavor profile. It is made by simmering bones, meat, and/or vegetables at a low temperature for an extended period, resulting in a clean and delicate broth. On the other hand, paitan broth, translating to "white soup," is characterized by its creamy and opaque appearance. This rich and thick broth is achieved by boiling bones, typically chicken or pork, at a high temperature until the collagen and marrow break down, creating a velvety texture and intense flavor.

The choice between chintan and paitan broth depends on the desired outcome of the ramen dish. Chintan broth is often used in lighter and more delicate ramen styles, allowing the other ingredients to shine without overwhelming the palate. Paitan broth is favored for heartier and more robust ramen varieties, perhaps acting more as a comfort food with its richness.
9. While dining at a ramen restaurant, sides such as "karaage" (deep-fried chicken) and these delicious fried dumplings might be on offer. What are these dumplings called in Japanese?

Answer: gyoza

Gyoza are made with a thin dough wrapper filled with a mixture of ground meat, usually pork, combined with finely chopped cabbage, garlic, ginger, and green onions. Soy sauce and sesame oil are added for extra flavor. The preparation begins by mixing the filling ingredients thoroughly and placing a small amount onto each wrapper. The edges of the wrapper are then moistened with water and folded over the filling, crimping the edges to seal the dumpling.

Gyoza can be cooked in various ways, but the most common method is to pan-fry them until the bottoms are crispy and golden, then adding a small amount of water to the pan and covering it to steam the dumplings until fully cooked. At ramen restaurants, gyoza are often served alongside other side dishes like edamame (steamed soybeans), takoyaki (octopus balls), and karaage (Japanese fried chicken). "Ajitama" are the eggs included as a ramen topping.
10. Instant ramen was invented in 1958 by Momofuku Ando amidst a food shortage in post-WWII Japan. What ingredient, most commonly supplied by the United States at that time, convinced Ando to come up with his innovation?

Answer: wheat flour

Japan faced severe economic hardships and food scarcity in the post-WWII era, prompting Ando to seek innovative solutions to alleviate hunger. He recognized the potential of wheat flour, which was being imported in large quantities from the United States as part of post-war aid efforts. Ando believed that noodles made from wheat flour would be more readily accepted by the Japanese population than bread made from the same ingredient. This was because noodles had been a staple food in Japanese cuisine for centuries, whereas bread was a relatively new and unfamiliar food item.

In 1958, after years of experimentation and research, Ando successfully invented the world's first instant ramen noodles. By flash-frying precooked noodles and seasoning them with dehydrated broth, Ando created a convenient and shelf-stable product that could be prepared quickly with just hot water. Instant ramen quickly gained popularity in Japan and eventually became a global phenomenon.
Source: Author trident

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor Bruyere before going online.
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