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Quiz about Match the Noun With Its Description
Quiz about Match the Noun With Its Description

Match the Noun With Its Description Quiz


Match the word in the right-hand column with its definition on the left-hand column. All the words are nouns (a person, place or thing).

A matching quiz by Billkozy. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
Billkozy
Time
3 mins
Type
Match Quiz
Quiz #
415,128
Updated
Feb 02 24
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
419
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Last 3 plays: john62450 (3/10), Guest 152 (5/10), Guest 72 (3/10).
(a) Drag-and-drop from the right to the left, or (b) click on a right side answer box and then on a left side box to move it.
QuestionsChoices
1. Cardboard sleeve on a disposable coffee cup  
  Grawlix
2. Circular metal part holding the eraser to the pencil  
  Ferrule
3. The dot over the lowercase i or j  
  Peen
4. Hard plastic coating on the end of a shoelace  
  Aglet
5. Indentation in the bottom of a wine bottle  
  Muntin
6. Infinity symbol   
  Zarf
7. Round or wedge-shaped end of a hammer   
  Tittle
8. Strip separating panes of glass in a window sash  
  Lemniscate
9. Typograhical symbols used to replace profanity  
  Petrichor
10. The way it smells when rain falls on parched earth  
  Punt





Select each answer

1. Cardboard sleeve on a disposable coffee cup
2. Circular metal part holding the eraser to the pencil
3. The dot over the lowercase i or j
4. Hard plastic coating on the end of a shoelace
5. Indentation in the bottom of a wine bottle
6. Infinity symbol
7. Round or wedge-shaped end of a hammer
8. Strip separating panes of glass in a window sash
9. Typograhical symbols used to replace profanity
10. The way it smells when rain falls on parched earth

Most Recent Scores
Apr 09 2024 : john62450: 3/10
Apr 08 2024 : Guest 152: 5/10
Apr 07 2024 : Guest 72: 3/10
Apr 06 2024 : sg271agmailcom: 10/10
Apr 01 2024 : Guest 199: 0/10
Mar 24 2024 : elmslea: 7/10
Mar 24 2024 : Mamadukz: 1/10
Mar 23 2024 : GlennaRuth: 7/10
Mar 21 2024 : Trufflesss: 10/10

Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Cardboard sleeve on a disposable coffee cup

Answer: Zarf

The dates back to 1836, and comes from the Arabic word "zarf", meaning vessel. As coffee spread across the world and arrived in Turkey, the sultans and palace staff were the elite, and the first to partake in it, and because it was brewed at a high temperature, a protective accessory was developed, and they were usually quite ornate. The modern zarf we use today in the form of a cardboard sleeve that a hot coffee cup fits into was invented in 1991 by Jay Sorensen who called it a "java jacket". It is said he was "inspired" to develop something in 1989 when he was pulling his car out of a drive-through coffee shop and spilled the coffee because it was too hot to hold in his bare hand.

The McDonald's corporation learned the lesson the hard way after a 1992 law suit over hot coffee proved to be a danger without something like a zarf to protect consumers.
2. Circular metal part holding the eraser to the pencil

Answer: Ferrule

We also call the protective point or knob on the end of an umbrella a ferrule. The word is traced back to the early 1600s from the old French "virelle", which in turn came from Latin "viriola", little bracelet. This bracelet concept lends easily to the metal ring, or tube placed over the end of a handle, and in this case a pencil, to help strengthen the attachment of the eraser to the pencil. Ferrule is also the term for the metal band (think ferrous = iron) at the bottoms of table legs, chair legs, or similar object, that strengthens them or prevents them from splitting.
3. The dot over the lowercase i or j

Answer: Tittle

Don't forget to tittle your i's and j's! Tittle comes from the Latin "titulus", which originally meant title. The medieval Latin "titulus" (stroke over an abridged word to indicate missing letters) came to refer to marks such as the tilde, as used for the Spanish letter (pronounced ee). That mark above the indicates the missing "e" letters on either side of the "n".
4. Hard plastic coating on the end of a shoelace

Answer: Aglet

The plastic or sometimes metal covering the ends of a lace or point, as in the reinforcement at the end of a shoelace, is an aglet. Interestingly, an aglet has a very similar function to the aforementioned ferrule in its capacity to strengthen the integrity of two things attached. Aglets keep the threading a lace is composed of from unraveling.

But aglets also make it easier to thread the lace through the eyelet of the footwear. Aglet derives from the Latin "acus", needle (as does the word acute), then from Old French "aiguillette", diminutive of "aiguille", again meaning needle.

Its debut in English around the mid-1400s had various spellings, such as aiglet.
5. Indentation in the bottom of a wine bottle

Answer: Punt

It's not just a kick that football players do usually on fourth down to give the football over to the other team...a punt is also what we call the indentation at the bottom of a molded glass bottle. Why the bottom of a wine bottle is called a "punt" is not entirely clear to etymologists, but one possibility may be that is comes from the British Midlands dialect "bunt", meaning to push, or butt with the head, and perhaps it's not much of a leap to imagine the bottle bottom being pushed in, or butted in. That dimple is also called a kick-up, which perhaps also supports the notion of an etymology stemming from rugby terminology.

Although it remains a matter of debate, explanations for the function of the punt include strengthening the bottle and also reducing its holding capacity. And also importantly, that indentation helps keep the bottle stable, from tipping over in case the bottle had a bulge at the bottom from the glass-blowing technique.
6. Infinity symbol

Answer: Lemniscate

The lemniscate is that sideways figure eight that is the symbol for infinity. Lemniscate comes from a Latin word "lemniscus", describing a pendent ribbon, or something with hanging ribbons, which is reflected in the symbol's graceful shape. There's a possibility it may also have some relation to the Aegean Island, Lemnos.
7. Round or wedge-shaped end of a hammer

Answer: Peen

The peen is the part of the hammer at the opposite side of the head from the part that hits the nail. A ball-peen hammer's peen is round shaped. The word's origin might be Scandinavian: the Norwegian dialectal "penn" and Old Swedish "pna" describe the act of beating iron thin with a hammer.
8. Strip separating panes of glass in a window sash

Answer: Muntin

The strips can be made of wood, metal or even a laminate. They're named for the way each one sticks up from the window. Muntin comes from the French "monter", to rise. The muntin bar is also called a glazing bar or sash bar.
9. Typograhical symbols used to replace profanity

Answer: Grawlix

A grawlix is series of typographical symbols, such as &$#!, used in text as a replacement for profanity. You'd see them often in comic strips for certain temperamental characters like Beetle Bailey's Sarge. It's not a word whose origin is known with certainty, despite the claim that some say it was coined by cartoonist Mort Walker, the very man that created the Beetle Bailey comic strip, who in his 1964 article "Let's Get Down to Grawlixes" popularized the word.

The grawlix itself, however appeared long before Mr. Walker's use of it--in a November 1, 1901 issue of the comic "Lady Bountiful", a grawlix was used to express the title character's shock. It's possible that the word comes from growl, which a person might be accompanying their cussing with.
10. The way it smells when rain falls on parched earth

Answer: Petrichor

Petrichor is that distinct pleasant smell that often we smell in the air after it rains following a long period of warm, dry weather. The word derives from the ancient Greek "petra", meaning stone, and "ichor", the ethereal fluid of the gods and immortals.

The phenomenon of this scent has of course existed since the dawn of time, but the word itself, petrichor, was coined in 1964 by Australian researchers Isabel Bear and Dick Thomas, in an article in the journal "Nature".
Source: Author Billkozy

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