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Quiz about Fictional Islands
Quiz about Fictional Islands

Fictional Islands Trivia Quiz


What is it about islands in novels? Why are there so many? And why are there so many fictional islands? Haven't we got enough real ones without imagining new ones? Let's examine why fictional islands occupy a disproportionate amount of literary space.

A photo quiz by 1nn1. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
1nn1
Time
3 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
411,227
Updated
Feb 14 23
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
9 / 10
Plays
408
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: buncha1956 (7/10), Guest 92 (9/10), Guest 174 (5/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. A lot of us as children came across Kirrin Island early in our childhood novels. From which prolific children's author's imagination did we find out about the adventures on this island? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. From the options given, what was the name of a fictitious island named in "Gulliver's Travels"? Hint


photo quiz
Question 3 of 10
3. Perhaps the most famous novel with a fictitious island is "Treasure Island" (1881). Who wrote this classic novel? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. "The Island of Doctor Moreau" (1896) was a science fiction novel by British author H. G. Wells. Where was his island? Hint


photo quiz
Question 5 of 10
5. Indian Island featured in the novel written by one of the best-selling novelists of all time. Who wrote "And Then There Were None"? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Isla Nublar was the setting for a novel by a best-selling novel by Michael Crichton. What was the name of the novel? Hint


photo quiz
Question 7 of 10
7. Amity Island was the setting for this '70s novel which became an instant best seller. What was the novel's name? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. "The Guns of Navarone" was written by Alistair McLean in 1957. Where was the fictitious island of Navarone? Hint


photo quiz
Question 9 of 10
9. "Shutter Island" was a 2003 novel by Dennis Lehane. What was the prominent building on the island? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Some of the best "island" novels are those where the fictitious island is not named. From the options below (and you won't need to go from the Earth to the Moon and back to find it), which novel is the only novel that contains an unnamed island that was unofficially named Lincoln Island? Hint


photo quiz

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View Image Attributions for This Quiz

Most Recent Scores
Dec 01 2023 : buncha1956: 7/10
Dec 01 2023 : Guest 92: 9/10
Nov 30 2023 : Guest 174: 5/10
Nov 29 2023 : Guest 174: 10/10
Nov 26 2023 : Taltarzac: 10/10
Nov 26 2023 : blackavar72: 8/10
Nov 24 2023 : thok: 6/10
Nov 15 2023 : LadyNym: 10/10
Nov 12 2023 : rossian: 10/10

Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. A lot of us as children came across Kirrin Island early in our childhood novels. From which prolific children's author's imagination did we find out about the adventures on this island?

Answer: Enid Blyton

Enid Blyton was a prolific children's author who enthralled generations of children despite literary criticism. The Famous Five (George (short for Georgina) and her cousins Julian, Dick and Anne, with dog Timmy, had a series of adventures over many books. In the first novel, "Five on a Treasure Island", we find out that George, who lived in Kirrin Cottage in Kirrin, and 'owns' an island, Kirrin Island in Kirrin Bay, undertook an adventure with her cousins looking for and finding shipwrecked treasure on Kirrin island.

It is believed that Blyton was inspired by two locations for Kirrin Island: the Isle of Purbeck and Brownsea Island, both in Poole Harbour in Dorset, where Blyton holidayed each year.

The photo depicts Brownsea island.
2. From the options given, what was the name of a fictitious island named in "Gulliver's Travels"?

Answer: Lilliput

Lilliput and Blefuscu are two fictional islands from "Gulliver's Travels" (1726) written by Jonathan Swift. The two islands are adjacent to one another in the South Indian Ocean. Both are inhabited by tiny people who are about one-twelfth the size of human beings. The geographical location is given in great detail: "northwest of Van Diemen's Land" (Tasmania) at latitude 302'S, Likewise, the map depicts Lilliput and Blefuscu south of 'Hogs Island', off northwest Sumatra, and northwest of Van Diemen's Land". This location is not possible, Tasmania and Sumatra are 4200km apart and the description matched the location which corresponds to the location of Australia which was unknown to Great Britain at the time of writing. Nevertheless, the island setting is integral to a wonderful novel.

The photo shows a scene from the novel where the people of Lilliput are about 1/12 the size of Gulliver.
3. Perhaps the most famous novel with a fictitious island is "Treasure Island" (1881). Who wrote this classic novel?

Answer: Robert Louis Stevenson

"Treasure Island" was originally titled "The Sea Cook: A Story for Boys" and was an adventure novel written by Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson. The novel was originally published in serial form in 1881-82 in the children's magazine "Young Folks", under the title "Treasure Island or the Mutiny of the Hispaniola: written by "Captain George North". It was first published as a book in 1883 by Cassell & Co.

It could well be considered the archetype of the pirate novel: it had a significant influence on depictions of pirates in popular culture. Such elements as deserted tropical islands, treasure maps marked with an "X" (X marks the spot), and one-legged seamen with parrots on their shoulders were first depicted in this novel.

When republished as the novel "Treasure Island", this was Stevenson's first financial and critical success.
4. "The Island of Doctor Moreau" (1896) was a science fiction novel by British author H. G. Wells. Where was his island?

Answer: South Pacific Ocean

In 1896, British author H.G Wells published the science fiction novel "The Island of Doctor Moreau". Edward Prendick, the narrator, tells the story of being shipwrecked in the Pacific and rescued by a passing boat and taken to the South Pacific island home of Doctor Moreau, a mad scientist who creates human-like monster hybrids from animals using vivisection (a popular theme at the time). The novel's themes include human identity, human interference with nature, pain and cruelty and most importantly, moral responsibility. Whilst it is a work of science fiction, it read more like a horror story when read by this author at an impressionable age.

While the novel has been criticised for its lack of scientific basis for its plot, this has not deterred generations of young readers who became enthralled by the concepts purported by this novel.

The photo depicts a scene from the musical "South Pacific".
5. Indian Island featured in the novel written by one of the best-selling novelists of all time. Who wrote "And Then There Were None"?

Answer: Agatha Christie

"And Then There Were None" (1939) is a murder mystery novel by the British writer Agatha Christie. This is the title that was released in the US. Its original title was taken from a children's counting song using a now-offensive word. It has also been known as "Ten Little Indians" in paperback form in the US.

The plot revolved around eight people invited to a small isolated island called Indian Island near the Devon coast. The host had not arrived and the guests were greeted by two servants. After the first meal, a recording was played to the guests indicating they have all killed another person. One by one the guests and servants are killed until no one is left alive. The police cannot solve the case, and we only find out what actually happened when a message in a bottle washed up on the Devonshire coast.

Agatha Christie described this novel as the most difficult of all her books to write. However, it became the world's best-selling mystery, with over 105 million copies sold. In 2016 the novel had been listed as the seventh best-selling title.

The photo shows the Orient Express, the setting for one of Ms Christie's other famous novels.
6. Isla Nublar was the setting for a novel by a best-selling novel by Michael Crichton. What was the name of the novel?

Answer: Jurassic Park

Michael Crichton could sure write a hit novel (and more than a few hit TV series as well). His scripts tend to be cautionary tales that combine contemporary technological achievements mashed with the undertones of ancient fables. His 1990 novel "Jurassic Park" was about genetically engineered dinosaurs in a modern world illustrating Chaos Theory. Islan Nublar was where this takes place, an island off the coast of Costa Rica. There are secondary themes such as the ethics, or lack of, in large corporations. The book was a best seller and so was the subsequent Spielberg movie with the same title. Perhaps the success of the movie should not be surprising given the novel was actually written from a completed screenplay that Crichton wrote in 1983.

The photo depicts Caleta Gonzalo, Chile which looks, according to the photographer, what he imagined Isla Nublar to look like.
7. Amity Island was the setting for this '70s novel which became an instant best seller. What was the novel's name?

Answer: Jaws

The rights to Peter Benchley's 1974 novel "Jaws" were sold to a Steven Spielberg company before it was released to the public. As such the release date of the novel and movie were very close together and there was an argument that the book was such a best seller because people bought the book after they saw the movie.

However, the book was a much more in-depth examination of the characters; in fact, none of the characters in the book was likeable. The novel was set in the town of Amity on Amity Island off the coast of Long Island, New York. Benchley based his novel on real events: the story was based on the 1916 New Jersey shark attacks when five people fell victim to sharks within two weeks. The town paid people to hunt down the shark as it was affecting tourism around the town. Benchley's Quint was based on Frank Mundus, a Montauk shark fisherman. Benchley extrapolated Mundus' experience in catching a huge great white shark off of the New York Long Island coast in his novel.
8. "The Guns of Navarone" was written by Alistair McLean in 1957. Where was the fictitious island of Navarone?

Answer: Greek islands

"The Guns of Navarone" is a 1957 WWII novel by Scottish writer Alistair McClean. The plot revolved around an Allied commando team's mission to destroy a seemingly well-defended German fortress on the fictitious island of Navarone. Tis was one of the Greek Islands that was a huge threat to Allied naval ships in the Aegean Sea, with over 1,200 isolated British Army soldiers marooned and awaiting rescue from behind the area defended by the German guns. The elite multicultural commando team had to climb up the daunting south face of Navarone's sheer cliffs to destroy the German guns.

The novel was made into a successful 1961 movie of the same name. It should be noted that "Force 10 from Navarone", the only sequel McLean wrote, was a continuation of the movie, not the book.
9. "Shutter Island" was a 2003 novel by Dennis Lehane. What was the prominent building on the island?

Answer: Hospital for the criminally insane

"Shutter Island" (2003) was a Dennis Lehane thriller which goes back to the fifties to tell the story of a U.S. Marshal who went to an isolated Massachusetts hospital for the criminally insane in Boston Harbor to investigate the apparent disappearance of a multiple-murderer patient. Dennis Lehane wrote this directly after "Mystic River" and wanted to write a "more taut thriller".

In a 2003 interview with Dave Welch from Powell's Books, Lehane said the novel was "an homage to gothic, but also an homage to B movies and pulp." Patrick Anderson raved in the Washington Post, when he reviewed the novel in the same year. "If we could bring back Edgar Allan Poe and equip him with today's postmodern bag of tricks, he might give us a tale as unexpected and unsettling as Shutter Island."
The novel had a killer ending that this reader did not see coming.

The book was made into a successful movie but in this reader's opinion the book was better.

The photo depicts the Massachusetts hospital that inspired the novel.
10. Some of the best "island" novels are those where the fictitious island is not named. From the options below (and you won't need to go from the Earth to the Moon and back to find it), which novel is the only novel that contains an unnamed island that was unofficially named Lincoln Island?

Answer: "The Mysterious Island" - Jules Verne

In Jules Verne's 1875 "The Mysterious Island", five prisoners of war escape during the Siege of Richmond, in Civil War Virginia, by hijacking a hydrogen-filled observation balloon. The balloon gets caught up in a storm and crash lands days later on a Pacific Ocean island 2500km/1600 mi east of New Zealand. They name it "Lincoln Island" in honour of Abraham Lincoln (they were, after all, Northern prisoners of war).

Robinson Crusoe was shipwrecked on an unnamed island off the coast of Venezuela which he called the Island of Despair.

In "Lord of the Flies" (1954), a plane undertaking a wartime evacuation crashed on an isolated island in a remote part of the Pacific Ocean, with the only survivors being a group of pre-teen boys.

In Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" (1932) protagonists Bernard and Helmholtz were exiled to an island in the Falklands for antisocial activity but the island, presumably one of the smaller ones, was not specified.

Jules Verne is depicted in the photo.
Source: Author 1nn1

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor looney_tunes before going online.
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