FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about Arizona  Law and Order 19122012
Quiz about Arizona  Law and Order 19122012

Arizona: Law and Order 1912-2012 Quiz


The wild west days of the territory of Arizona may be gone, but the state of Arizona has had its share of interesting court cases, arrests and law men and women. Let's visit some of the legal highlights of Arizona's first century as a state.

A multiple-choice quiz by PDAZ. Estimated time: 4 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. World Trivia
  6. »
  7. The Law
  8. »
  9. U.S. Law

Author
PDAZ
Time
4 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
346,554
Updated
Apr 14 23
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
498
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. In 1934, the U.S. Supreme Court first heard the case of Arizona v. California, and they didn't issue their final decree until 1964. What scarce commodity in the western states was at the core of the case? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Known as "America's Toughest Sheriff", Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio found a way to deal with overcrowding in the county's jails. Where did he house prisoners? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. "You have the right to remain silent..." One of the most famous court cases in Arizona (and in the nation) dealt with the arrest of suspects. Which case was it? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. In a case that ended up being dismissed, diminutive fitness guru Richard Simmons was arrested at Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix in 2004. With what crime was he charged? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. The Indian Citizenship Act of 1924 recognized Native Americans as citizens of the United States and gave them the right to vote, but some states denied the right based on technicalities. What reason was given in 1928 to deny Native Americans in Arizona the right to vote? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. In the 1930s and 1940s, why was the Arizona border town of Yuma a popular place for celebrities from California to get married? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Which notorious Chicago gangster was captured in Tucson in 1934? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Arizona justice Sandra Day O'Connor made history when she became the first woman to sit on the U.S. Supreme Court in 1981. What claim to fame did fellow Arizona judge Lorna Lockwood hold? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. In 1992, Arizona became the first state to have a voter-approved holiday honoring which man? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. One of the most notorious court cases in Arizona history occurred in 1932, when Winnie Ruth Judd was found guilty and sentenced to hang. With what crime was Judd charged? Hint



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. In 1934, the U.S. Supreme Court first heard the case of Arizona v. California, and they didn't issue their final decree until 1964. What scarce commodity in the western states was at the core of the case?

Answer: Water

The "Water Wars" in the western U.S. started with the 1907 Supreme Court ruling in the case of Kansas v. Colorado, in which the Supreme Court decreed that states had an equality of rights to water flowing through their states. The states with entitlements to the Colorado River continued to battle over their shares until the case of Arizona v. California confirmed Arizona's entitlement and let to the establishment of the Central Arizona Project, a 336-mile long canal bringing Colorado River water to Phoenix and Tucson.
2. Known as "America's Toughest Sheriff", Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio found a way to deal with overcrowding in the county's jails. Where did he house prisoners?

Answer: In tents

Besides making prisoners wear pink underwear, eat green bologna and work on chain gangs, Sheriff Joe started housing prisoners in large, military-style tents in 1993. Called "Tent City", the prisoners would even reside outside in the tents during the heat of the summer.

The conditions brought about lawsuits by the American Civil Liberties Union alleging that pre-trial detainees and inmates were being held in substandard and unhealthy conditions; the U.S. District Court (2008 and 2010) and Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals (2010) agreed, and Arpaio continued to be the subject of Justice Department investigations for other violations including racial profiling and abuse-of-power.
3. "You have the right to remain silent..." One of the most famous court cases in Arizona (and in the nation) dealt with the arrest of suspects. Which case was it?

Answer: Miranda v. Arizona

The Miranda Warning was the result of the 1966 Supreme Court case "Miranda v. Arizona" in which Arizona native Ernesto Miranda sued to have his conviction for kidnapping, rape and robbery overturned because he hadn't been informed of his rights before signing a confession.

Although his conviction was overturned in the 5-4 Supreme Court decision, he was retried and convicted. After his parole in 1972, he sold autographed Miranda warning cards. He was stabbed to death during a bar fight in Phoenix in 1976.

His murderer was never caught.
4. In a case that ended up being dismissed, diminutive fitness guru Richard Simmons was arrested at Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix in 2004. With what crime was he charged?

Answer: Slapping a Harley Davidson salesman/cage fighter

Known for his exercise videos and for wearing a tank top with short shorts, Simmons was arrested in 2004 at Sky Harbor International Airport for slapping a 6'2"/ 255 lb Harley Davidson salesman/cage fighter who was mocking him. The "victim" claimed he was just recognizing Simmons for his "Sweating to the Oldies" videos. The case was later dropped at the request of the victim.
5. The Indian Citizenship Act of 1924 recognized Native Americans as citizens of the United States and gave them the right to vote, but some states denied the right based on technicalities. What reason was given in 1928 to deny Native Americans in Arizona the right to vote?

Answer: They were wards of the government.

Arizona was among several states that denied Native Americans the right to vote despite the passage of the Indian Citizenship Act. Some states justified their denial on a lack of English proficiency, but the reason upheld in the Arizona case Porter v. Hall (1928) was that Native Americans were wards of the government and thus unable to vote in accordance with the Arizona State Constitution. Arizona granted Native Americans the right to vote in 1948 as a result of the Harrison v. Laveen court case in which the state Supreme Court overruled Porter v. Hall.
6. In the 1930s and 1940s, why was the Arizona border town of Yuma a popular place for celebrities from California to get married?

Answer: Arizona didn't require pre-marital blood tests.

In the 1930s, states began requiring pre-marital blood test for herpes, and California was among the first to do so. The nearest place for celebrities to go for a quick marriage without the tests was the border town of Yuma, Arizona. Among those who crossed the border to get married were John Barrymore , Errol Flynn, Jean Harlow, Bette Davis, Tom Mix, Loretta Young, Gloria Swanson, Charles Boyer, Carole Landis and studio boss Louis B. Mayer. Stan Laurel (of Laurel and Hardy fame) had three of his five marriages in Arizona - two in Yuma and one in Florence. Yuma lost its popularity when Arizona enacted a similar blood test law in the 1950s (the law was repealed in 1984).
7. Which notorious Chicago gangster was captured in Tucson in 1934?

Answer: John Dillinger

Dillinger had been hiding out at Tucson's Hotel Congress when a fire broke out on January 21st, 1934. He and his gang escaped the fire but then gave the firemen money to retrieve their heavy baggage (which was filled with guns) from the building. Stories vary but most state that a fireman recognized members of Dillinger's gang in a magazine he was reading, and the police arrested Dillinger and his gang at a rented house soon after and shipped Dillinger back to Chicago. Tucson commemorates the event with its annual "Dillinger Days 1934 Street Festival" in January.
8. Arizona justice Sandra Day O'Connor made history when she became the first woman to sit on the U.S. Supreme Court in 1981. What claim to fame did fellow Arizona judge Lorna Lockwood hold?

Answer: First woman Chief Justice of a state supreme court

Although she passed the State Bar exam in 1925, Lockwood worked as a legal stenographer for the next fourteen years since she couldn't find work as a lawyer. In 1939, she decided to enter politics and was elected to the Arizona House of Representatives.

She became a trial judge in 1951, a state Supreme Court justice in 1961, and in 1965, Lockwood became the first female Chief Justice of a state supreme court in the US. She apparently was almost nominated by Lyndon Johnson to be the first woman on the US Supreme Court, but Johnson instead selected Thurgood Marshall, the first black American to sit on the high court.
9. In 1992, Arizona became the first state to have a voter-approved holiday honoring which man?

Answer: Martin Luther King, Jr.

"Martin Luther King, Jr. Day" was first recognized as a paid holiday in Arizona in 1986 by an executive order of then governor Bruce Babbitt. The following year, the new governor, Evan Mecham, rescinded the order, claiming it was illegal because the legislature hadn't approved it, which then set off several years of bickering over the holiday.

In 1990, the issue finally went to the voters. Earlier the same year, Arizona was awarded the 1993 Super Bowl (that's the championship for American gridiron football) with the unwritten stipulation that the voters needed to approve the holiday.

A combination of ultra-right-wing voters and voters not keen on being told how to vote doomed the measure, and the holiday was rejected, resulting in the loss of the Super Bowl. Boycotts of Arizona followed, and two years later, voters finally approved the holiday where it is celebrated as "Martin Luther King, Jr./Civil Rights Day".

While the holiday is celebrated nationwide under various names, Arizona was the first state to do so through the voting box rather than the legislature.
10. One of the most notorious court cases in Arizona history occurred in 1932, when Winnie Ruth Judd was found guilty and sentenced to hang. With what crime was Judd charged?

Answer: Killing two friends and shipping them to Los Angeles

Known as the "Trunk Murderess", Judd was sentenced to death for killing two friends in Phoenix and shipping them to Los Angeles in 1931, but she was instead sent to the Arizona State Hospital (mental institution) until her release in 1971. Subsequent investigations have raised doubt about her conviction; some sources believe that Phoenix businessman and playboy, Jack Halloran, may have been involved in the murders.

Incidentally, chopping down saguaros without permits is also a crime in Arizona, but people are rarely hanged for it.
Source: Author PDAZ

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor stedman before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
Related Quizzes
This quiz is part of series PDAZ's Arizona Highlights:

Here's a variety of quizzes on beautiful Arizona and the Sonoran Desert.

  1. Arizona Highlights Average
  2. Arizona: In the Beginning Average
  3. Arizona, 1912-2012 Average
  4. Arizona: The People 1912-2012 Average
  5. Arizona: Places to See 1912-2012 Average
  6. Arizona: That's Entertainment 1912-2012 Average
  7. Arizona: Science and Inventions 1912-2012 Average
  8. Arizona: On Film 1912-2012 Average
  9. Arizona: On TV 1912-2012 Easier
  10. Arizona: Law and Order 1912-2012 Average
  11. Arizona and Religion: 1912-2012 Average
  12. Arizona: Animals 1912-2012 Average

7/22/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us