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Quiz about Exonyms and Eponyms
Quiz about Exonyms and Eponyms

Exonyms and Eponyms Trivia Quiz


World travelers soon encounter the importance of language. A rose by any other name may smell as sweet, but globe trotters may well board the wrong plane without a little knowledge of the local lingo.

A multiple-choice quiz by sidnobls. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Author
sidnobls
Time
6 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
298,417
Updated
Jul 23 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Difficult
Avg Score
5 / 10
Plays
479
Last 3 plays: Guest 99 (3/10), Guest 146 (8/10), Guest 182 (2/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. The tour I'm planning will include visiting chocolate production in Tyskland, goat cheese makers in S'aksamaa, the famous castles of Nemecko, a brewery in Vuokiteje, the vineyards of L'Allemagne and outdoor markets in Dyzh. How many international border crossings will I make altogether? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. A woman asks a Tokyo airline agent for a ticket to Gasshukoku. Will she be flying east or west?

Answer: (One Word)
Question 3 of 10
3. Some places are more successful than others at discarding their exonyms (foreign reference names). Which of the following place names is still in use by the Greek people despite the wishes of its people? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. Which of these countries' endonyms (their own name for themselves) is most widely in use throughout the world? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. In which of the following languages is England called "England"? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. Congratulations, you have won the Nobel Prize! You borrow your neighbor's tuxedo and book a three day trip to Northern Europe for December 9-11. Which destination should your ticket read? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. Desperate to stretch her vacation dollars, Heather is handed a brochure offering an extremely affordable cruise package aboard the SS Dolus with a ships' registry of "Confoederatio Helvetica". "But hurry, staterooms are almost sold out!" Should Heather move fast to book the cruise?


Question 8 of 10
8. Putting out from Piraeus by ferry, you travel north in the expectation of seeing canals and gondoliers. You traverse a canal, sure enough, but are put ashore someplace that clearly isn't Venice. Your tickets say Ellda-Shqipria. Where have you ended up? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Poor Ambassador Smith. He just deplaned in Washington after his unsuccessful shuttle diplomacy mission from Nihon to Hanminguk to Jhonggu to Joseon; back to Jhonggu and then directly to Nihon, followed by a quick stopover in Hanminguk on his way home. Which country saw the least of Ambassador Smith? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Hrvati live all over the world, and are known in English speaking nations by another name (an exonym). To which of the following cities would Hrvati book flights in order to be repatriated? Hint



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Most Recent Scores
Nov 13 2023 : Guest 99: 3/10
Nov 13 2023 : Guest 146: 8/10
Nov 13 2023 : Guest 182: 2/10
Nov 13 2023 : Guest 219: 4/10
Nov 13 2023 : Guest 157: 2/10
Oct 29 2023 : Guest 136: 10/10
Oct 29 2023 : Guest 136: 7/10
Oct 12 2023 : cseanymph: 6/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. The tour I'm planning will include visiting chocolate production in Tyskland, goat cheese makers in S'aksamaa, the famous castles of Nemecko, a brewery in Vuokiteje, the vineyards of L'Allemagne and outdoor markets in Dyzh. How many international border crossings will I make altogether?

Answer: none

All are place names for Germany: in Danish (Tyskland), French (L'Allemagne), Chinese (Dyzh), Czeck (Nemecko), in Estonian (S'aksamaa), Latvian (Vuokiteje), and in Polish (Niemcy). It's hard to say, but this could be because Deutschland is hard to say.
2. A woman asks a Tokyo airline agent for a ticket to Gasshukoku. Will she be flying east or west?

Answer: east

Gasshukoku is what the Japanese call the United States. "Gasshukoku, Gasshukoku, God shed his grace on thee..." just doesn't have that same ring to it.
3. Some places are more successful than others at discarding their exonyms (foreign reference names). Which of the following place names is still in use by the Greek people despite the wishes of its people?

Answer: Constantinople

At the urging of local governments, Saigon became Ho Chi Minh City in 1976. Nahavand, Iran was formerly named Laodicea after Laodice of Macedonia. Dubris is what the Romans called Dover, but it didn't stick - most likely because of the difficulty of rhyming with it. "There'll be joy and hubris at the white cliffs of Dubris" just doesn't warm the heart in quite the same fashion. Istanbul, however, is still called Constantinople in Greece despite the name having been changed in Turkish (and other languages) in the 1920s. According to the Four Lads in 1953, "Evr'y gal in Constantinople is a Miss-stanbul, not Constantinople, so if you've date in Constantinople, she'll be waiting in Istanbul" - unless, of course, she's Greek!
4. Which of these countries' endonyms (their own name for themselves) is most widely in use throughout the world?

Answer: Vietnam

Vietnam is virtually identical in every language: Bulgarian, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Khmer, Laotian, Maltese, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, Swedish, Thai, and Turkish to name a few. Surprisingly, the three peoples that can't seem to negotiate the pronunciation: the Chinese (Yunn), Japanese (Betonamu) and Koreans (Beteunam).
5. In which of the following languages is England called "England"?

Answer: Danish

While Wales and Northern Ireland are part of the United Kingdom, their linguistic roots, like Brittany's are in Celtic, hence, England is referred to as 'Lloegr' in Welsh, 'Bro-Saoz' across the channel in Brittany and 'Sasana' in Irish Gaelic.
6. Congratulations, you have won the Nobel Prize! You borrow your neighbor's tuxedo and book a three day trip to Northern Europe for December 9-11. Which destination should your ticket read?

Answer: It depends on the category

I couldn't resist a trick question here. The Nobel prizes are all awarded on the anniversary of Alfred Nobel's death, December 10 each year. The Prize for Peace is presented in Oslo, Kongeriket Noreg (Norway), while the rest are given in Stockholm, Konungariket Sverige (Sweden). Finland (Suomen Tasavalta) usually passes the day still recovering from Itsenisyyspiv - Independence Day (December 6).
7. Desperate to stretch her vacation dollars, Heather is handed a brochure offering an extremely affordable cruise package aboard the SS Dolus with a ships' registry of "Confoederatio Helvetica". "But hurry, staterooms are almost sold out!" Should Heather move fast to book the cruise?

Answer: No

"Confoederatio Helvetica" is Latin for "Swiss Confederation". Switzerland has no ocean going ports and, in fact, 'Dolus' is Latin for 'deceit'. Heather would be passing pictures of toy boats in her birdbath around the office in a vain effort to save face with her co-workers.
8. Putting out from Piraeus by ferry, you travel north in the expectation of seeing canals and gondoliers. You traverse a canal, sure enough, but are put ashore someplace that clearly isn't Venice. Your tickets say Ellda-Shqipria. Where have you ended up?

Answer: Durrs, Albania

Shqipria is Albania to the Albanians. Albania is where Gjergj Skenderberg defeated the Ottoman Sultan Murad II in 1450. You'll be so busy trying desperately to hire a donkey cart to haul you through several war zones to reconnect with your tour group who are enjoying gondolier rides under the Bridge of Sighs that you won't notice the ancient groves of olive trees and the many lime kilns dotting the beautiful landscape.
9. Poor Ambassador Smith. He just deplaned in Washington after his unsuccessful shuttle diplomacy mission from Nihon to Hanminguk to Jhonggu to Joseon; back to Jhonggu and then directly to Nihon, followed by a quick stopover in Hanminguk on his way home. Which country saw the least of Ambassador Smith?

Answer: North Korea

Ambassador Smith launched his diplomatic initiative from Tokyo, flew to Seoul, then to Beijing, China so that he could enter North Korea. Exiting North Korea, he could only travel through China and returned to Japan and then to Washington DC with a quick stop in South Korea to report the results of his efforts to the South Korean government. North Korea is Joseon. Japan is Nihon. South Korea is Hanminguk and China is Jhonggu.

He was taken, tongue-tied, to Walter Reed Army Hospital in Bethesda, Maryland, right from the plane.
10. Hrvati live all over the world, and are known in English speaking nations by another name (an exonym). To which of the following cities would Hrvati book flights in order to be repatriated?

Answer: Zagreb, Croatia

The Hrvati (Croatians) are the southern slavs of the Balkan peninsula who, for the most part, adhered to Roman Catholicism, not converting to the eastern Slavic church (Serbs) or to Islam (Bosnians). Approximately nine million Croats live in many parts of the world, but only fifty percent live in Croatia, their homeland.
Source: Author sidnobls

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor TabbyTom before going online.
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