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Quiz about Sydney at Night
Quiz about Sydney at Night

Sydney at Night Trivia Quiz


As the sun sets over the tall buildings and leafy suburbs of Sydney, a whole host of other creatures emerge to share the night with the bustling human inhabitants of this vibrant city.

A matching quiz by turtle52. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
turtle52
Time
5 mins
Type
Match Quiz
Quiz #
403,637
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
229
(a) Drag-and-drop from the right to the left, or (b) click on a right side answer box and then on a left side box to move it.
QuestionsChoices
1. At dusk you might be lucky enough to spot this sturdy marsupial emerge from his burrow for a night of foraging on grass, leaves and roots.   
  Broad-tailed gecko
2. Across the darkening sky, a black cloud of these night flyers can be seen travelling up to 50 km from their camps to feed on pollen, nectar and fruit.  
  Brushtail possum
3. Attracted by the lights or blown off course by strong winds, these large dark brown insects can invade Sydney in the thousands.   
  Bogong moth
4. Looking just like the tree branch on which it was perched, this silvery-grey bird silently pounces on an unsuspecting moth and returns with it to his tree.  
  Rakali
5. A bushy, prehensile tail is a common feature of this fruit-loving, roof-invading folivore.   
  Tawny frogmouth
6. This flat lizard with the leaf-shaped tail, is perfectly motionless on a rocky outcrop as it lies in wait for a passing spider or moth.   
  Grey-headed flying fox
7. From the garden pond comes a knocking sound as this voracious amphibian calls to his mate.  
  Golden-crowned snake
8. On the banks of Sydney's harbours and waterways, these large carnivorous native rodents emerge from their burrows at dusk to swim and hunt for food.   
  Striped marsh frog
9. This nocturnal reptile with the yellowish markings down each side of the head, hunts sleeping skinks in leaf litter by scent.  
  Common wombat
10. This venomous creature will rush out of its burrow when an unsuspecting lizard or insect walks over the silk trip-lines set up outside it. They will quickly subdue their prey and return to the burrow to eat it.   
  Sydney funnel-web spider





Select each answer

1. At dusk you might be lucky enough to spot this sturdy marsupial emerge from his burrow for a night of foraging on grass, leaves and roots.
2. Across the darkening sky, a black cloud of these night flyers can be seen travelling up to 50 km from their camps to feed on pollen, nectar and fruit.
3. Attracted by the lights or blown off course by strong winds, these large dark brown insects can invade Sydney in the thousands.
4. Looking just like the tree branch on which it was perched, this silvery-grey bird silently pounces on an unsuspecting moth and returns with it to his tree.
5. A bushy, prehensile tail is a common feature of this fruit-loving, roof-invading folivore.
6. This flat lizard with the leaf-shaped tail, is perfectly motionless on a rocky outcrop as it lies in wait for a passing spider or moth.
7. From the garden pond comes a knocking sound as this voracious amphibian calls to his mate.
8. On the banks of Sydney's harbours and waterways, these large carnivorous native rodents emerge from their burrows at dusk to swim and hunt for food.
9. This nocturnal reptile with the yellowish markings down each side of the head, hunts sleeping skinks in leaf litter by scent.
10. This venomous creature will rush out of its burrow when an unsuspecting lizard or insect walks over the silk trip-lines set up outside it. They will quickly subdue their prey and return to the burrow to eat it.

Most Recent Scores
May 19 2024 : Kat1982: 0/10
May 14 2024 : Guest 110: 8/10

Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. At dusk you might be lucky enough to spot this sturdy marsupial emerge from his burrow for a night of foraging on grass, leaves and roots.

Answer: Common wombat

Also called the bare-nosed wombat to distinguish it from its hairy-nosed cousins, the common wombat can be found in Tasmania and along the south eastern part of Australia all the way up to, and just into, Queensland. They are more likely to be found in the semi-rural outskirts of the city. With their backward facing pouches these stocky little guys can dig extensive and complex burrows that may be the bane of farmers' lives but are a godsend to other wildlife who have been known to shelter in unused or rarely used tunnels to avoid bushfires and predators. "Fatso the Fat-Arsed Wombat" was an unofficial mascot for the Sydney 2000 Olympics.
2. Across the darkening sky, a black cloud of these night flyers can be seen travelling up to 50 km from their camps to feed on pollen, nectar and fruit.

Answer: Grey-headed flying fox

The grey-headed flying fox is the largest of the Australian fruit eating megabats which can't echolocate but use sight and smell to navigate and find food. In Sydney, they've been known to hang out in Centennial and Hyde Parks and the managed Kuringai Flying Fox Reserve in the northern suburbs. Because of the distances travelled each day, they are an important part of the ecosystem as super pollinators.

Unfortunately, concerns over destruction of gardens, disease, smell and noise have made them unwelcome in urban areas and often lead to standoffs between residents and environmental agencies. With rapidly declining numbers, they are listed as vulnerable.
3. Attracted by the lights or blown off course by strong winds, these large dark brown insects can invade Sydney in the thousands.

Answer: Bogong moth

The bogong moth is not a resident of Sydney but more of an accidental tourist. Normally found in western parts of NSW and Victoria, they migrate each spring to the Southern Alps to aestivate in caves and crevasses. A large moth with a wingspan of 40-50 mm, their dark brown wings are quite distinctive with each having a darker stripe with 2 light spots.

They were an important source of food for the local aborigines and a number of native birds and mammals as well as providing a tasty treat for other creatures on their unexpected layovers in large cities.
4. Looking just like the tree branch on which it was perched, this silvery-grey bird silently pounces on an unsuspecting moth and returns with it to his tree.

Answer: Tawny frogmouth

The tawny frogmouth might look like an owl but it is a totally different bird. They mostly eat large nocturnal insects, but will also eat frogs, lizards, small birds and mammals. They love a bogong moth. They don't mind living close to humans and are often passed by unnoticed during the day as they can camouflage themselves as a broken tree branch.
5. A bushy, prehensile tail is a common feature of this fruit-loving, roof-invading folivore.

Answer: Brushtail possum

Brushtail possums are quite happy to live alongside humans and, although they usually make their homes in tree hollows, they have been known to invade the roof space of suburban homes, much to the consternation of the other occupants. Eucalyptus leaves make up a large proportion of their diet but they will also eat other plant and animal matter.

They are very fond of the fruit and vegetables so thoughtfully provided by backyard gardeners or left unattended in the kitchen. Introduced to New Zealand, they have become a major pest as they have few predators and have been known to eat the eggs and young of native birds and small animals.
6. This flat lizard with the leaf-shaped tail, is perfectly motionless on a rocky outcrop as it lies in wait for a passing spider or moth.

Answer: Broad-tailed gecko

Also known as the Sydney leaf-tailed gecko, these lizards are usually found around the rockier areas of the Sydney Basin but have been known to adapt and make their homes in trees or in man-made buildings or structures. Well camouflaged and able to stay motionless for some time, they hunt by ambush.

The unusually shaped tail is used for storing fat and can be dropped and regrown if threatened. The regrown tail will be smoother and have a different colouration to the original one.
7. From the garden pond comes a knocking sound as this voracious amphibian calls to his mate.

Answer: Striped marsh frog

These frogs are some of the most common on the the East coast of Australia and can be found near almost any source of still water, even slightly polluted waters. They have a varied diet and will eat anything that will fit in their mouth, including other frogs. The call of the male is a 'toc' sound that has been likened to a dripping tap or hitting a piece of wood with a hammer.
8. On the banks of Sydney's harbours and waterways, these large carnivorous native rodents emerge from their burrows at dusk to swim and hunt for food.

Answer: Rakali

Also known as the water-rat, rakali can be distinguished by the dark coat, lighter underside and white tip on the tail. The tail is used as a rudder when they swim. They can reach weights of over a kilo can be found pretty much across all the eastern states of Australia and New Guinea. Predominantly nocturnal, they are not shy about getting around during the day as well.

They hunt from the water's edge or while swimming and will eat almost anything. They seem to have no ill effects from eating poisonous cane toads. Water rats was a derogatory term for Sydney Water Police and the title of a police procedural based on them.
9. This nocturnal reptile with the yellowish markings down each side of the head, hunts sleeping skinks in leaf litter by scent.

Answer: Golden-crowned snake

Found in eastern Australia from the south coast of NSW to far north Queensland, these snakes can be common all over Sydney especially the Northern suburbs or in the moister areas. They are venomous but not really considered dangerous as they will rarely bite, despite putting on an impressive mock display.

They mostly live on lizards but will eat frogs, tadpoles and blind snakes. They may sometimes be encountered on warm nights, crossing suburban streets or brought inside by domestic cats, giving their owners a bit of a fright.
10. This venomous creature will rush out of its burrow when an unsuspecting lizard or insect walks over the silk trip-lines set up outside it. They will quickly subdue their prey and return to the burrow to eat it.

Answer: Sydney funnel-web spider

The Sydney funnel-web is the world's deadliest spider and not a native you might want to meet up with. They are very sensitive to sunlight and dehydrate quickly so they are usually active only at night. The female generally tends to stick to her burrow but the male will often wander around in search of a mate or after rain.

At dawn, when they have to find shelter, they will use any convenient dark, cool place including shoes and houses.
Source: Author turtle52

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor rossian before going online.
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