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Quiz about If I Only Had a Brain
Quiz about If I Only Had a Brain

If I Only Had a Brain Trivia Quiz


There are many ways of casting aspersions on a person's intelligence. Here are a few examples with some tenuously related questions.

A multiple-choice quiz by suomy. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Author
suomy
Time
6 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
359,771
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
7 / 10
Plays
837
- -
Question 1 of 10
1. I am heading out of the library door with my head in Stephen Hawking's latest work when "Hey, pea-brain! Watch where you are going" rings out. Pea-brain? Makes me ponder which of these animals has the smallest brain compared to body weight? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. Going into the bakery for a loaf, I narrowly miss upsetting a tray of rolls in my haste to avoid standing on a baby's toy. This brought comments about being a bun short of a dozen, which seemed a little unfair. I was going to ask how many buns did that mean, but thought the better of it. What would the answer have been if I'd asked the question? (Hint: you are in a bakery)

Answer: (One Word (spell the number in full ))
Question 3 of 10
3. I was walking past some of my colleagues when I heard one mutter: "In business, stupidity is not a handicap." My ears were burning a bit, but I don't think he had me in mind. It sounded like he was paraphrasing a former European leader who said: "In politics, absurdity is not a handicap." Who is the quote attributed to? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. I must be losing my marbles ... well, my favourite one in particular. I cannot find it. It is very distinctive. It is probably in my son's bedroom. This brings to mind the Elgin Marbles and the original owners who want them back. Which Mediterranean country do the Marbles originally come from?
Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. At the ten-pin bowling alley the other night, I have to admit that I found the gutter more than once. When my team mates asked what I thought I was doing, I explained that I was trying a mind control technique. They were not impressed and referred to me as being about as sharp as a bowling ball. I thought the problem was with my bowl myself. This got me thinking about bowls and what they were made of. What material was first used in bowls for ten-pin bowling?
Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. I started a new hobby recently involving ringing bells in the local village church. Swinging on the bell rope has earned me a few dirty looks and comments to do with me having bats in the belfry. I look at it as a kind of skittles, although I must admit it is disturbs the musical rhythm a bit. Which of the following has the LEAST to do with musical towers?
Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. I was stuck by the side of the road with a flat tyre. I knew I had my AA membership for a reason. When the roadside assistance man came to help, he thankfully had a puncture repair kit and soon got my bicycle up and running again. It didn't stop him muttering: "He couldn't pour water out of a boot with instructions on the heel." This had my mind wandering again and I was trying to remember which British general, famous for his victory at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815, gave his name to a boot. Who was it?
Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. We were just examining my latest attempt at baking bread. There was a distinct brick-like feel to it. Probably something to do my forgetting to add yeast to the mix. My better half sighed: "If brains were dynamite, you wouldn't have enough to blow your nose." In an attempt to move the topic away from the culinary mistake, what could I say but: "Oh ... and which country did the inventor of dynamite come from?" Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. There I was quietly sitting on a bench enjoying some rays and allowing my mind to wander. I was brought back to reality after my ears registered the comment: "That's living proof that nature does not abhor a vacuum." "Are they talking about me", I thought as I closed my mouth scattering the birds picking over my sandwich. (Mental note: close my eyes next time and people will think I am sleeping.) So, apart from my head, where is the best place to find a natural vacuum? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. Sometimes it feels like my head is full of stuffed straw. Good for a few mice to go to sleep in but not much else. If I only had a brain, I'd know in which 1939 film the song "If I Only Had a Brain" appears. Which is it? Hint



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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. I am heading out of the library door with my head in Stephen Hawking's latest work when "Hey, pea-brain! Watch where you are going" rings out. Pea-brain? Makes me ponder which of these animals has the smallest brain compared to body weight?

Answer: Hippopotamus

The figures for brain: body mass ratio are 1:2,789 (hippo), 1:600 (horse), 1:560 (elephant) and 1:125 (dog). A more accurate measure of intelligence would be the ratio of the size of the brain to what it should be, given the body mass of the animal.

This would make the elephant more intelligent than the dog. Where do humans come on the list? At the top ... unless you count me with my pea-brain.
2. Going into the bakery for a loaf, I narrowly miss upsetting a tray of rolls in my haste to avoid standing on a baby's toy. This brought comments about being a bun short of a dozen, which seemed a little unfair. I was going to ask how many buns did that mean, but thought the better of it. What would the answer have been if I'd asked the question? (Hint: you are in a bakery)

Answer: Twelve

we're in a bakery - a baker's dozen is thirteen so one bun short makes twelve. Why thirteen in a baker's dozen? It goes back to the times of King Henry III and a statute called the Assize of Bread and Ale which could result in potentially draconian punishment for supplying short measures. Bakers developed the practice of baking an extra loaf in a batch of twelve as a form of insurance.
3. I was walking past some of my colleagues when I heard one mutter: "In business, stupidity is not a handicap." My ears were burning a bit, but I don't think he had me in mind. It sounded like he was paraphrasing a former European leader who said: "In politics, absurdity is not a handicap." Who is the quote attributed to?

Answer: Napoleon Bonaparte

The quote can be found in 'Napoleon: In His Own Words' edited by Jules Bertaut, as translated by Herbert Edward Law (1916). 'Stupidity' is often used in the quote instead of 'absurdity'. Napoleon I rose to power as a general and then seized political power in 1799.

His disastrous military foray into Russia led to his exile to Elba. After re-emerging from exile, he met his Waterloo in 1815 which was followed by permanent exile to St Helena.
4. I must be losing my marbles ... well, my favourite one in particular. I cannot find it. It is very distinctive. It is probably in my son's bedroom. This brings to mind the Elgin Marbles and the original owners who want them back. Which Mediterranean country do the Marbles originally come from?

Answer: Greece

The source of the phrase "losing one's marbles" is probably not a reference to the Greek's loss of the sculptures and friezes to Lord Elgin. The term used to apply to losing one's temper as well as losing one's mind.

Lord Elgin acquired his Marbles over the course of a decade from 1801 while ambassador to the Ottoman Empire in Greece. Greece at the time was under Ottoman control. Controversy over ownership of the Marbles continues to this day. Maybe that Lord Elgin has my missing marble as well.
5. At the ten-pin bowling alley the other night, I have to admit that I found the gutter more than once. When my team mates asked what I thought I was doing, I explained that I was trying a mind control technique. They were not impressed and referred to me as being about as sharp as a bowling ball. I thought the problem was with my bowl myself. This got me thinking about bowls and what they were made of. What material was first used in bowls for ten-pin bowling?

Answer: Wood

Ten-pin bowling is a relatively recent game and is a variant of nine-pin bowling introduced into the United States from Europe. Versions of the game arguably go back as far as Egyptian times where stones bowls were used. Henry VIII is said to have used cannonballs for bowls. From 1906, wood was replaced with a hardened rubber as the material of choice for bowls, with plastic taking over during the 1960s and 1970s.
6. I started a new hobby recently involving ringing bells in the local village church. Swinging on the bell rope has earned me a few dirty looks and comments to do with me having bats in the belfry. I look at it as a kind of skittles, although I must admit it is disturbs the musical rhythm a bit. Which of the following has the LEAST to do with musical towers?

Answer: Pilaster

A pilaster is a type of column built into or onto a wall. A belfry is a bell tower or the part of a tower which houses the bells. Campanile is the Italian name for a bell tower and a steeple is another name for a church tower. A carillon is a set of bells typically in a tower and played via a keyboard. Many bells use an automated playing system.
7. I was stuck by the side of the road with a flat tyre. I knew I had my AA membership for a reason. When the roadside assistance man came to help, he thankfully had a puncture repair kit and soon got my bicycle up and running again. It didn't stop him muttering: "He couldn't pour water out of a boot with instructions on the heel." This had my mind wandering again and I was trying to remember which British general, famous for his victory at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815, gave his name to a boot. Who was it?

Answer: Wellington

Arthur Wellesley, Duke of Wellington, had a modified version of the leather Hessian boot made, which he is said to have worn during the Battle of Waterloo. When vulcanised rubber became available, the rubber version of the boot was (surprisingly perhaps) first produced and used in France. The two World Wars saw large scale use of the rubber boot by British forces and popularised their use in the UK. Other names used include gum boots, gummies, rain boots, billy boots and wellies.
8. We were just examining my latest attempt at baking bread. There was a distinct brick-like feel to it. Probably something to do my forgetting to add yeast to the mix. My better half sighed: "If brains were dynamite, you wouldn't have enough to blow your nose." In an attempt to move the topic away from the culinary mistake, what could I say but: "Oh ... and which country did the inventor of dynamite come from?"

Answer: Sweden

What made dynamite so successful was that unstable nitroglycerin became safer and easier to handle when mixed with an inert substance such as diatomaceous earth.

The wealth generated by dynamite (and other inventions such as gelignite) allowed its inventor Alfred Nobel to use his will to set up the Nobel Prize funds. His decision to do so is said to have been influenced by seeing his premature obituaries along the lines of "the merchant of death is dead", which were mistakenly printed by French newspapers following the death of one of his brothers in France.
9. There I was quietly sitting on a bench enjoying some rays and allowing my mind to wander. I was brought back to reality after my ears registered the comment: "That's living proof that nature does not abhor a vacuum." "Are they talking about me", I thought as I closed my mouth scattering the birds picking over my sandwich. (Mental note: close my eyes next time and people will think I am sleeping.) So, apart from my head, where is the best place to find a natural vacuum?

Answer: Intergalactic space

There are still a few atoms floating around each cubic metre of space so strictly speaking space is not a perfect vacuum, however it is about as good as it gets in the natural world. Gravity keeps most of the atoms clustered around stars, planets, black holes and the like. Atmospheres around planets such as Earth gradually reduce in density as you move away from the surface. The quality of the vacuum therefore varies throughout space.
10. Sometimes it feels like my head is full of stuffed straw. Good for a few mice to go to sleep in but not much else. If I only had a brain, I'd know in which 1939 film the song "If I Only Had a Brain" appears. Which is it?

Answer: The Wizard of Oz

Harold Arlen and E.Y. Harburg collaborated to produce all the songs in the film "The Wizard of Oz" including "Over The Rainbow", which was voted number one in the Recording Industry Association of America's list of "Songs of the Century".

The song "If I Only Had a Brain" was sung by the Scarecrow with the Cowardly Lion and the Tin Man singing their versions "If I Only Had the Nerve" and "If I Only Had a Heart" respectively. It all worked out in the end so there is hope for me yet.
Source: Author suomy

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor Snowman before going online.
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This quiz is part of series Commission #28:

The human body is the focal point for this twenty-eighth Commission from the Author's Lounge. Releasing in May 2013, this one challenged participants to write quizzes based on titles received containing body parts.

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