Quiz about The British Experience Part Two
Quiz about The British Experience Part Two

The British Experience. Part Two Quiz


Another quiz that will be easy for those from the UK and a little more testing for non-Brits. Have a go - The best of British luck to you!

A multiple-choice quiz by musicmonkeyman. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Time
3 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
179,145
Updated
Sep 18 22
# Qns
15
Difficulty
Very Easy
Avg Score
14 / 15
Plays
17106
Awards
Top 20% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 178 (14/15), Guest 74 (10/15), Guest 195 (11/15).
This quiz has 2 formats: you can play it as a or as shown below.
Scroll down to the bottom for the answer key.
1. Which British queen gave her name to a type of sponge cake? Hint

Victoria
Alexandra
Anne
Mary

2. Which of these is an annual race between Putney and Mortlake in London? Hint

boat race
pancake race
half marathon
egg and spoon race

3. The pudding traditionally eaten with roast beef has the same name as which English county? Hint

Sussex
Devon
Lancashire
Yorkshire

4. Where is the official residence of the British Prime Minister? Hint

Downing Street
Whitehall Place
Constitution Hill
The Strand

5. In what part of the UK is haggis traditionally eaten? Hint

Scotland
Wales
England
Northern Ireland

6. Legend says that St. George, the patron saint of England, slew what type of creature? Hint

Lion
Dragon
Phoenix
Unicorn

7. The vegetable leek is the emblem for which part of the UK? Hint

Wales
Northern Ireland
Scotland
England

8. In which of these countries is "Pommy" (Pommie) a term used for the English? Hint

USA
India
France
Australia

9. What would you do with a "toad-in-the-hole"? Hint

eat it
wear it
sing it
let it out

10. According to legend the nursery rhyme "Ring a Ring a Roses" (or "Ring Around the Rosy") relates to which 17th-century British disaster? Hint

Great Famine
Fire of London
Great Plague
Viking invasion

11. In 2002 Liverpool Airport was renamed as a tribute to which member of the Beatles? Hint

Paul McCartney
Ringo Starr
George Harrison
John Lennon

12. Wimbledon is famous for which type of annual sporting tournament? Hint

cricket
net ball
tennis
hockey

13. A "Cockney" comes from which of these British cities? Hint

London
Liverpool
Glasgow
Cardiff

14. The Channel Tunnel, linking the UK to the rest of Europe, runs between England and which country? Hint

Belgium
Netherlands
Germany
France

15. Which of these statements is true about unmarked English mute swans? Hint

They are all black
They cannot fly
They are owned by the Crown
They do not have webbed feet


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Which British queen gave her name to a type of sponge cake?

Answer: Victoria

A Victoria sandwich is two layers of sponge cake with a jam (jelly) filling in between.
2. Which of these is an annual race between Putney and Mortlake in London?

Answer: boat race

The University Boat Race dates back to 1829, it is said to be the world's oldest surviving sporting event. Teams from Oxford and Cambridge Universities compete for the honours over the four-and-a-quarter-mile course on the river Thames.
3. The pudding traditionally eaten with roast beef has the same name as which English county?

Answer: Yorkshire

Yorkshire pudding is made with a batter mix: flour, egg, milk, fat and salt. Place in a hot oven 450' F for ten to fifteen minutes. If successful the pudding will be crisp and golden on the outside, and light and fluffy on the inside.
4. Where is the official residence of the British Prime Minister?

Answer: Downing Street

Number 10 Downing Street has been the official home of British Prime Ministers since 1735. It was a gift to the Government from King George II. The Chancellor of the Exchequer's official residence is next-door at number 11 Downing Street.
5. In what part of the UK is haggis traditionally eaten?

Answer: Scotland

Traditional haggis is made with: lambs liver, oatmeal, suet and onion, seasoned with salt and pepper. These ingredients are stuffed into a sheep's stomach (pluck) and boiled for several hours - Yummy! Haggis is traditionally served in Scotland on (Robert) Burns Night, January 25th.
6. Legend says that St. George, the patron saint of England, slew what type of creature?

Answer: Dragon

The dragon is said to represent Satan, and according to the legend St George killed the dragon to defend the church.
The UK celebrates St George's Day on the 23rd of April.
7. The vegetable leek is the emblem for which part of the UK?

Answer: Wales

The leek has been an emblem for Wales for around five-hundred years. Legend says that the Welsh fought the Saxons in leek fields. Also in the past leeks formed an important part of the Welsh diet. The daffodil is also used a Welsh emblem and is worn on St. David's Day, 1 March - St. David is the patron saint of Wales.
8. In which of these countries is "Pommy" (Pommie) a term used for the English?

Answer: Australia

There are several possible derivations for the expression "Pommy" (Pommie). One says that it could be a corruption of the word pompous. Another, that it could date back to the time England transported convicts to Australia, and is an be an acronym of the phrase "Prisoner Of Mother England" (Pome), "Prisoner of His/Her Majesty" (POHM) or "Prisoner Of His/Her Majesty In Exile" (POHMIE).
9. What would you do with a "toad-in-the-hole"?

Answer: eat it

Toad-in-the-hole is a traditional English dish and an old favourite. The ingredients are pork sausages baked in a batter mix.
10. According to legend the nursery rhyme "Ring a Ring a Roses" (or "Ring Around the Rosy") relates to which 17th-century British disaster?

Answer: Great Plague

The Great Plague struck London in 1665. The nursery rhyme goes:
"Ring around a rosey, a pocket full of posies.
Achoo, Achoo, we all fall down."
Symptoms of the bubonic plague were circular red rashes and violent sneezing. People carried fragrant posies of flowers in their pockets for protection as it was believed the plague was transmitted by bad smells. The Great Fire of London, in 1666, killed the rats that carried the disease and ended the spread of the disease - although, there are claims that the rhyme post-dates the plague and therefore may not be not connected.
11. In 2002 Liverpool Airport was renamed as a tribute to which member of the Beatles?

Answer: John Lennon

Liverpool Airport was renamed John Lennon Airport in March 2002. As part of the ceremony Yoko Ono unveiled a statue of her late husband. This is the first UK airport to be named after an individual.
12. Wimbledon is famous for which type of annual sporting tournament?

Answer: tennis

The first lawn tennis championship was held at Wimbledon in 1877. Around half-a-million tennis fans attend the championships each year. The traditional spectator fare at Wimbledon includes fish and chips (fries), strawberries and cream, and champagne.
13. A "Cockney" comes from which of these British cities?

Answer: London

A true Cockney is born within the sound of the Bow Bells, the bells of St. Mary-Le-Bow Church, in the Cheapside area of London. Cockneys are famous for their sense of community and their rhyming slang: e.g. "Trouble And Strife" ... Wife, "Baked Beans" ... Jeans, And "Grass In The Park" ... Nark (Informant) These terms were often abbreviated to the first word of the rhyme and used as a form of code.
14. The Channel Tunnel, linking the UK to the rest of Europe, runs between England and which country?

Answer: France

The Channel Tunnel was opened by Queen Elizabeth II and French President François Mitterrand on May 6, 1994. It is thirty-one miles (fifty km) long and has three separate parallel tunnels. All Channel Tunnel traffic goes by rail and the journey takes thirty-five minutes.
15. Which of these statements is true about unmarked English mute swans?

Answer: They are owned by the Crown

The normal lifespan of a swan is around twelve years, although they can survive to thirty years. Swans generally mate for life and grieve like humans for a lost partner. Each year in the third week of July a census of the swans on the river Thames, called "Swan Upping", is conducted.
Source: Author musicmonkeyman

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor sunfloweruk23 before going online.
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