Quiz about Wikipedia Says So It Must Be True
Quiz about Wikipedia Says So It Must Be True

Wikipedia Says So; It Must Be True Quiz


Browsing through some of Wikipedia's endless pages, I noticed a few glaring mistakes. Let's see if we can edit out some of the problems which may be in the articles themselves or which may be in the pictures. Good luck!

A photo quiz by kyleisalive. Estimated time: 5 mins.
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Author
kyleisalive
Time
5 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
335,556
Updated
Feb 01 22
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Easy
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
5818
Awards
Top 5% quiz!
Last 3 plays: Guest 69 (10/10), Guest 82 (10/10), Guest 2 (3/10).
photo quiz
1. Article: 'Caviar'
Caviar is a delicacy made from the eggs (or roe) of certain fish. Although trout, salmon, and whitefish roe can be made into caviar, the most common fish used is swordfish. To make this haute cuisine, roe is often surgically removed from the fish before being salted and processed.

What happens to be the problem with this article?
Hint

The picture include does not depict caviar; it depicts coffee beans
Caviar is never salted because it removes the taste of the roe
Roe refers to the eyes of fish- not the eggs
Caviar typically uses sturgeon roe- not swordfish roe

photo quiz
2. Article: 'Leprechaun'
A mischievous little guy from Scottish folklore, the leprechaun is characterized by his small stature and usually-green outfits (though they have been red in the past). According to legend, a leprechaun can usually be found guarding the pot of gold at the end of a rainbow.

What problem can be found with this article?
Hint

According to legends, leprechauns guard a pot of soup at the end of the rainbow
Leprechauns are typically taller than humans according to legend
The picture does not depict a leprechaun- it shows a common garden gnome
Leprechauns originate in Irish folklore

photo quiz
3. Article: 'Harpsichord'
This instrument uses both strings and keys to create its sounds. Related to the piano, the harpsichord was used by Mozart in his early works and it is most often associated with the Renaissance era.

What's wrong with this article?
Hint

The picture does not depict a harpsichord
Harpsichords were first made in the Romantic era, many generations after the Renaissance
Harpsichords do not contain keys
Mozart never used the harpsichord in his works

photo quiz
4. Article: 'Superman'
First introduced in the original issue of 'Action Comics' in 1938, Superman has been a classic superhero. Over the years he's been played by Christopher Reeve, Dean Cain, and Tom Welling. His powers include teleportation, x-ray vision, and freeze breath.

Wikipedia's done it again; what seems to be the problem with this?
Hint

Superman debuted in 'Super Comics #1' in 1945
The picture does not depict Superman
Christopher Reeve never played the role of Superman
Superman can't teleport

photo quiz
5. Article: 'Sheep'
Baaaa! Sheep are livestock animals bred for their wool and meat. As herbivores, sheep seem like some of the friendlier animals on the farmstead and they can be found worldwide (but most particularly Australia, New Zealand, and South America). Haggis, a Scottish delicacy, is made of sheep innards.

What makes this a 'baaaaa-d' article?
Hint

The picture doesn't depict a sheep
Sheep are omnivores; they eat meat as well
Haggis is actually made from cow innards
Sheep are not found in New Zealand; they were banned by law in the 1850s

photo quiz
6. Article: 'Thirteen'
A prime number, thirteen is one of superstition. Oft-cited as unlucky (especially when paired with Fridays), the fear of '13' is Triskaidekaphobia. There are thirteen in a baker's dozen, thirteen apostles at the Last Supper, and thirteen in each suit of a regular deck of cards. The thirteenth letter of the alphabet is M.

Which important fact about this topic seems to be wrong?
Hint

The fear of the number thirteen is actually Paraskevidekatriaphobia
There were not thirteen apostles at the Last Supper
There are not thirteen cards in each suit of a deck of cards
The thirteenth letter of the alphabet is not M

photo quiz
7. Article: 'Golf'
A sport where precision is key, golf requires that you hit a dimpled ball off a tee and aim for a small hole in the distance. Hitting the ball in within a prescribed number of shots is called 'par', and if you get the ball in one under par, it's called a 'birdie'. Two under par is an 'albatross'.

Take a swing. What's incorrect about this article?
Hint

Two under par is not an 'albatross'
The picture does not depict golfing
One under par is not a 'birdie'
Golf does not use a ball with dimples

photo quiz
8. Article: 'Japan'
An Asian country resting in the Pacific Ocean, Japan is one of the world's most populated countries. Its capital city is Tokyo and its highest mountain is Mount Fuji. One of the world's most advanced countries, Japan maintains high life-expectancy rates and invented sumo wrestling.

Which seems to be incorrect about this 'Japan' article?
Hint

Sumo wrestling was invented in Korea, not Japan
Tokyo is not Japan's capital
Mount Fuji is not the country's highest mountain
The picture does not depict Japan

photo quiz
9. Article: 'Tulip'
A flower grown from a bulb, the tulip is an perennial flower, meaning it only grows once a year and seeds are not resown to allow it to grow in subsequent year. Tulips are often attributed to South Africa, one of their major producers. Tulips fall into the same genetic family as lilies.
Hint

Tulips are not grown from bulbs; they grow from seeds
Tulips are exclusively annual flowers; not perennial
The picture does not depict tulips
Tulips are not typically associated with South Africa

photo quiz
10. Article: 'Sony'
A brand to be reckoned with, Sony got its start in Japan in the 1940s and has grown to be a leading electronics developer. Known for the PlayStation video game console, Sony also invented Betamax, the CD, the Walkman, and the iPod. Sony is also associated with BMG to record and distribute music from artists including Aerosmith, Madonna, and Michael Jackson.

Where is the error found in this article?
Hint

Sony never invented Betamax
Sony got its start in the 1970s
Sony never invented the iPod
Sony is not a Japanese company; it's Taiwanese


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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. Article: 'Caviar' Caviar is a delicacy made from the eggs (or roe) of certain fish. Although trout, salmon, and whitefish roe can be made into caviar, the most common fish used is swordfish. To make this haute cuisine, roe is often surgically removed from the fish before being salted and processed. What happens to be the problem with this article?

Answer: Caviar typically uses sturgeon roe- not swordfish roe

Caviar, made from the eggs of specific fish, is a relatively costly dish in most countries. Because of its status as a garnish delicacy for the elite, caviar is typically seen as an upper crust food. Although most caviar is black in colour, some may find it in red, especially in the salmon caviar used in Japan (used on sushi, usually).

Originally found in the sturgeon population in the southwestern edges of Russia, caviar has been most attributed to that region of the world though you can find different variations of it worldwide.
2. Article: 'Leprechaun' A mischievous little guy from Scottish folklore, the leprechaun is characterized by his small stature and usually-green outfits (though they have been red in the past). According to legend, a leprechaun can usually be found guarding the pot of gold at the end of a rainbow. What problem can be found with this article?

Answer: Leprechauns originate in Irish folklore

Leprechauns are most definitely stereotypes of the Irish culture and you're most likely to associate these fantastical beasts with St. Patrick's Day every March. Although the typical representation of the leprechaun is a green-clad, short human, the original Irish folklore stated that leprechauns wore red outfits instead.

This appearance has obviously changed as time has passed. While gnomes are usually smaller, friendlier, and found in the gardens of the world, the leprechaun is just as mystical. If caught, a leprechaun is said to grant wishes and it stores its hoarded gold at the end of the rainbow. Worst case scenario, if you meet the creature from the horror movie, "Leprechaun", kindly give back his gold and run.
3. Article: 'Harpsichord' This instrument uses both strings and keys to create its sounds. Related to the piano, the harpsichord was used by Mozart in his early works and it is most often associated with the Renaissance era. What's wrong with this article?

Answer: The picture does not depict a harpsichord

Played very much like one would play the piano, a harpsichord is an instrument containing a keyboard which, when struck, plucks strings inside its case to create finely-tuned sound. The harpsichord was quite popular up until the late Baroque period, but with more refined players of the piano, the instrument fell by the wayside. According to historians, harpsichords have been around since the Middle Ages. Composers such as Mozart, Bach, and Haydn all wrote music to be specifically-played on this fascinating device. The image associated with this article happens to be a harp, and that's where the problem rests. Harps are not harpsichords.

While both have strings and both are instruments, the typical harp is played when fingers pluck the strings.
4. Article: 'Superman' First introduced in the original issue of 'Action Comics' in 1938, Superman has been a classic superhero. Over the years he's been played by Christopher Reeve, Dean Cain, and Tom Welling. His powers include teleportation, x-ray vision, and freeze breath. Wikipedia's done it again; what seems to be the problem with this?

Answer: Superman can't teleport

Debuting in 'Action Comics #1', Superman soon became one of the world's most famous superheroes of all-time. Part of the DC Comics world (along with Batman, Green Lantern, Wonder Woman, and others), Superman became one of the earliest superheroes to star in a movie series.

The original "Superman" film was released in 1948 and starred Kirk Alyn, but the more famous adaptation was directed by Richard Donner (known for the "Lethal Weapon" series, "The Goonies", and "The Omen") in 1978 and starred Christopher Reeve. Over the years, "Superman" has been brought to cinemas and TV in the past and present of his long run. Superman has invulnerability, super-strength, x-ray vision, heat vision, freeze breath, and many other hidden skills said to result from his history beginning on another planet.

He does not have teleportation powers; he can fly instead.
5. Article: 'Sheep' Baaaa! Sheep are livestock animals bred for their wool and meat. As herbivores, sheep seem like some of the friendlier animals on the farmstead and they can be found worldwide (but most particularly Australia, New Zealand, and South America). Haggis, a Scottish delicacy, is made of sheep innards. What makes this a 'baaaaa-d' article?

Answer: The picture doesn't depict a sheep

Sheep are quite the creatures. Although they're typically thought of as rather passive, herding creatures, they've been depicted rather infrequently in movies and literature. The horror film "Black Sheep" featured killer sheep while George Orwell's "Animal Farm" framed sheep as rather dumb, servile creatures.

Sheep have also been fairly important in the world of science; scientists cloned a sheep for the first time in 1996 (named Dolly, after Dolly Parton.) Not baaaa-d at all. How did that llama even get in there anyways? While sheep are part of the Ovis genus in the Caprinae subfamily, the llama is part of the Lama genus in the Camelidae family.

Other famous Caprinae are goats, oxen, and ibex.
6. Article: 'Thirteen' A prime number, thirteen is one of superstition. Oft-cited as unlucky (especially when paired with Fridays), the fear of '13' is Triskaidekaphobia. There are thirteen in a baker's dozen, thirteen apostles at the Last Supper, and thirteen in each suit of a regular deck of cards. The thirteenth letter of the alphabet is M. Which important fact about this topic seems to be wrong?

Answer: There were not thirteen apostles at the Last Supper

Contrary to this particular article, there were only twelve apostles in the Christian faith: Peter, Andrew, James, John, Philip, Bartholomew, Matthew, Thomas, James, Thaddeus, Simon, and Judas, all of whom were said to have joined Jesus during the Last Supper before he was crucified. Paraskevidekatriaphobia actually happens to be the fear of Friday the 13th as a day. Because of this date's notorious unluckiness, a popular horror movie franchise about a masker killer from Camp Crystal Lake (Jason Voorhees) has persisted through decades of films.
To add to the significance, there are thirteen players on each side in rugby league and thirteen original U.S. colonies.
Thankfully, there's no questioning the picture for this one.
7. Article: 'Golf' A sport where precision is key, golf requires that you hit a dimpled ball off a tee and aim for a small hole in the distance. Hitting the ball in within a prescribed number of shots is called 'par', and if you get the ball in one under par, it's called a 'birdie'. Two under par is an 'albatross'. Take a swing. What's incorrect about this article?

Answer: Two under par is not an 'albatross'

In golf, the point is to get the ball to the hole in the least amount of shots- obviously, a hole-in-one is the best possibility. While one under par is a 'birdie', two under par is an 'eagle', three is an 'albatross', and the rare four under par is a 'condor'. If you go one over par it's a 'bogey'. Typically an outdoor sport, golf is played with clubs of different materials, shapes, and sizes on a pre-made course with dimpled golf balls.

The dimples in the balls happen to make them more aerodynamic. Golf is played around the world, and the many environments in which it is played add to the interest behind the sport; fascinating courses are found around the globe, each with their own perks.
8. Article: 'Japan' An Asian country resting in the Pacific Ocean, Japan is one of the world's most populated countries. Its capital city is Tokyo and its highest mountain is Mount Fuji. One of the world's most advanced countries, Japan maintains high life-expectancy rates and invented sumo wrestling. Which seems to be incorrect about this 'Japan' article?

Answer: The picture does not depict Japan

The picture associated with this article actually happens to be taken from Tiananmen Square outside the Forbidden City in Beijing, China, thousands of miles from Japan. This is further proven to be a Chinese site by the inclusion of Mao Zedong's photo on the UNESCO structure. Japan is a much smaller country than China, but in its series of islands created by volcanic activity in the Ring of Fire, it contains over 120,000,000 people, a quarter of which live within the metropolitan area of Tokyo. Japan is a technological mecca, and many scientific innovations have originated within its cities.
9. Article: 'Tulip' A flower grown from a bulb, the tulip is an perennial flower, meaning it only grows once a year and seeds are not resown to allow it to grow in subsequent year. Tulips are often attributed to South Africa, one of their major producers. Tulips fall into the same genetic family as lilies.

Answer: Tulips are not typically associated with South Africa

While tulips can, no doubt, be planted and grown in a warm climate like one would find in South Africa, these particular flowers are more commonly attributed to Holland having been brought to this part of Europe from the Ottoman Empire (Turkey, specifically). Now, tulips can be found in many countries around the world. Tulips grow once in a year, usually in the springtime, and then they should be replanted.

While they are typically perennial flowers, they usually don't have a full blossom in subsequent years unless temperatures are steady year-round.

Although tulips are often found to grow with enclosed, bulb-formation petals, they often bloom quite beautifully and can be cultivated in a wide array of colours.
10. Article: 'Sony' A brand to be reckoned with, Sony got its start in Japan in the 1940s and has grown to be a leading electronics developer. Known for the PlayStation video game console, Sony also invented Betamax, the CD, the Walkman, and the iPod. Sony is also associated with BMG to record and distribute music from artists including Aerosmith, Madonna, and Michael Jackson. Where is the error found in this article?

Answer: Sony never invented the iPod

Sony certainly did not invent the iPod; that honour would go to Apple, a company which, up to that point, would've been known for its computers. Due to smart marketing, strong service, and good products, Apple became one of the leading names in electronics in the 2000s and released the iPod, a portable music device which beat out Sony's earlier MP3 creations to be one of the most popular music devices in the world. Sony has made amazing products since its founding in 1946. Along with the products already listed, Sony created the PSP, the DVD, the Memory Stick (for digital cameras), the Blu-Ray Disc, and the Floppy Disc.

Not only is Sony a leading electronics brand, it has become one of the most powerful media companies ever made.
Source: Author kyleisalive

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