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Quiz about Paris  From Top to Bottom
Quiz about Paris  From Top to Bottom

Paris - From Top to Bottom Trivia Quiz


Sure, you could just walk the streets of Paris and enjoy all it has to offer, but what if you worked your way through from the top downward? Here are ten spots in the City of Light, all lower than the last. Bonne chance!

A photo quiz by kyleisalive. Estimated time: 4 mins.
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Author
kyleisalive
Time
4 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
391,151
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
352
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
-
Question 1 of 10
1. At 276 meters above the ground, the Eiffel Tower's top floor is one of the highest points you can visit in the city of Paris. This landmark overlooks what lengthy park space below? Hint


photo quiz
Question 2 of 10
2. The top of the Basilica of the Sacred Heart is one of the highest points in Paris because it overlooks the city from atop one of its tallest hills. Which hill does this landmark sit upon? Hint


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Question 3 of 10
3. Which hill marks the highest plot of land above sea level in the City of Paris? Hint


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Question 4 of 10
4. A short distance to the west of Central Paris, this structure stands 110m tall. Known as La Grande Arche, what shape does it form? Hint


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Question 5 of 10
5. Found on l'Île de la Cité, Notre-Dame de Paris has been memorialized in literature and film for centuries. During which of these events did the structure have its construction completed?
Hint


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Question 6 of 10
6. The Arc de Triomphe only reaches a height of 50m, but from the top you can easily see straight down what famous avenue? Hint


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Question 7 of 10
7. The Louvre Pyramid was created by I. M. Pei and sits in the middle of a courtyard in the Palais du Louvre. To enter the museum from there, you need to descend into the pyramid.


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Question 8 of 10
8. The Seine River cuts across the city of Paris flowing from southeast to northwest. Where does the river ultimately come to an end? Hint


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Question 9 of 10
9. Beneath the streets of Paris lie its world-famous sewers. If placed end-to-end, for approximately how long could these tunnels extend? Hint


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Question 10 of 10
10. Deeper than Paris' sewers and metro lines, the Catacombs are said to reach twenty meters below the city. This is possible because they were formed in which of these locations? Hint


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May 30 2024 : RLJSJK: 6/10
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Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. At 276 meters above the ground, the Eiffel Tower's top floor is one of the highest points you can visit in the city of Paris. This landmark overlooks what lengthy park space below?

Answer: Champ de Mars

In terms of starting from the top, the third floor observation deck of the Eiffel Tower isn't going to be topped. At 276m up (and it's 324m at the top of the antenna) and 35ft. above sea level at the base, it stretches higher than many of Paris' rolling hills.

The image provided shows the Champ de Mars, a stretch of lawns, paths, and gardens that reach from the Eiffel Tower to the École Militaire on the opposite end. This park space has been used for centuries, sometimes as a military training ground, sometimes as a movie shoot location, and most usually as leisure space.
2. The top of the Basilica of the Sacred Heart is one of the highest points in Paris because it overlooks the city from atop one of its tallest hills. Which hill does this landmark sit upon?

Answer: Montmartre

Found in the north of Paris in the 18th arrondissement, Montmarte has been known over the centuries as a haven for artists of all sorts. Aside from the basilica, it's also the home of the Moulin Rouge and Le Quartier Pigalle which, at the turn of the century, became more known for its stretch of sex shops than anything.

But that shouldn't detract from what a vibrant neighbourhood the area is. From the top of the hill, Sacré-Coeur overlooks the city from a height of 130m above sea level. The top of the structure, thus, reaches 165m above sea level.

The church was built over a forty year period and took until partway through the first World War to be completed.
3. Which hill marks the highest plot of land above sea level in the City of Paris?

Answer: Belleville

While many have believed the hilltop upon which Sacré-Coeur rests to be the highest point on land in Paris, the top of Belleville is nearly 20m higher, so while the top of the Basilica of Sacré-Coeur is higher, the city tops out, physically, in the 20th arrondissement close to both Belleville and Pere Lachaise Cemetery, the latter of which is known as the final resting place of Oscar Wilde, Frédéric Chopin, Édith Piaf, and Jim Morrison. All of this is in Paris' northeast end, north of the Seine.
4. A short distance to the west of Central Paris, this structure stands 110m tall. Known as La Grande Arche, what shape does it form?

Answer: Cube

La Grande Arche de la Défense is perhaps the most unique architectural piece in La Défense, only a short distance from the central portion of the City of Paris, but it's definitely worth taking a look at, especially since it's a straight shot down Avenue Charles de Gaulle from many of Paris' most famous landmarks (and the end of l'axe historique).

While La Défense is known as a business district, La Grande Arche is a bit of a hybrid building; constructed as a cube (its dimensions on the outside are all 110m), two of its sides are government offices. From the observation deck on the top, however, it's one of the highest man-made tourist vantage points in the city.
5. Found on l'Île de la Cité, Notre-Dame de Paris has been memorialized in literature and film for centuries. During which of these events did the structure have its construction completed?

Answer: The Hundred Years War

Standing 90m tall (though only 61m from the bell tower), Notre-Dame Cathedral is characterized by its French Gothic architecture which, in 1345, pushed it past the Romanesque structures of the Late Middle Ages. This is particularly interesting because the building began its construction in the mid-twelfth century, only ending around the start of the Hundred Years War.

The High Gothic look would become popular in other French cities like Rouen, Amiens, and Chartres. The church also stands on l'Île de la Cité which, adjacent to the similar Île Saint-Louis, is one of the two natural islands in the City of Paris.

It's also home to Pont Neuf, Paris' oldest bridge.
6. The Arc de Triomphe only reaches a height of 50m, but from the top you can easily see straight down what famous avenue?

Answer: Champs-Élysées

The Champs-Élysées heads due west from the famous Arc de Triomphe, ending at Place de la Concorde before progressing into the Tuileries Gardens and towards the Louvre. The Arc isn't as high as one may think, reaching an observation deck at the top at only 50m, but it was the tallest arch of its type until the 1930s, lasting about a hundred years with that record.

The tourist avenue of Champs-Élysées heads in one direction, but the Arc de Triomphe sits in the center of twelve avenues, all of which project outward from it.

It also serves as Paris' Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.
7. The Louvre Pyramid was created by I. M. Pei and sits in the middle of a courtyard in the Palais du Louvre. To enter the museum from there, you need to descend into the pyramid.

Answer: True

After the pyramid completed construction in 1989, this metal and glass structure became the entrance to view the Louvre's many works of art and historical artifacts, meaning visitors needed to descend inside to the lobby, then reascend into the actual museum. Of course, since this museum was one of the most famous in the world, it has since required extensive renovations deep within to accommodate the foot traffic.

The Musée du Louvre itself, a former royal palace for the Kings of France, sits in the administrative 1st arrondissement and contains some of the most well-known, priceless masterpieces of the world.
8. The Seine River cuts across the city of Paris flowing from southeast to northwest. Where does the river ultimately come to an end?

Answer: The English Channel

The Seine starts in the town of Source-Seine in Eastern France and travels nearly eight hundred kilometers, through Paris, to Le Havre in the Normandy region before discharging into the English Channel. In Paris, the river flows in from the southeast and loops back to the south before coursing back north again, out of the city.

Many of the city's most famous landmarks-- the Eiffel Tower, Notre-Dame, the Louvre, the Musée d'Orsay, etc.-- sit within a short distance of the river which, in the city, is flanked by pedestrian sidewalks and covered in bridges (thirty-seven in the city proper).

In the city, the river is 24m above sea level and about 10m deep.
9. Beneath the streets of Paris lie its world-famous sewers. If placed end-to-end, for approximately how long could these tunnels extend?

Answer: 2,100km

Paris first started building its underground sewers in the fourteenth century and have since become one of the forerunners for modern sewage treatment and waterworks. While, for centuries, most of the wastewater in Paris flowed directly into the Seine, continuous improvements over centuries created methods to protect the city and the health of its citizens. Near the Pont de l'Alma in the 7th arrondissement, visitors can descend into the tunnels in the Paris Sewer Museum and walk these rarely-seen sides of the streets of Paris themselves. If they walked them all though, they could easily just walk the same distance to Vilnius, Lithuania.
10. Deeper than Paris' sewers and metro lines, the Catacombs are said to reach twenty meters below the city. This is possible because they were formed in which of these locations?

Answer: Old mines

The Parisian Catacombs came to be in the early nineteenth century when Parisians used the old limestone mines in the south of the city to solve their overcrowded cemetery problem. It became a visitable ossuary in the 1810s, inevitably opening daily to take in curious travellers and tourists.

The mines sink down five storeys below the streets of Paris, but many believe them to descend even deeper than that. There are more than two hundred kilometers of tunnels down there, and more than seven million bodies.
Source: Author kyleisalive

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