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Quiz about The Cities on Their Banks
Quiz about The Cities on Their Banks

The Cities on Their Banks Trivia Quiz


Many of Europe's major rivers pass through numerous cities. Can you identify the one pictured from the clues?

A photo quiz by EnglishJedi. Estimated time: 6 mins.
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Author
EnglishJedi
Time
6 mins
Type
Photo Quiz
Quiz #
377,622
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Tough
Avg Score
6 / 10
Plays
553
Last 3 plays: OldManOfTheSea (6/10), maninmidohio (10/10), Guest 193 (3/10).
photo quiz
1. We start our tour on Europe's longest river, the Volga. The original Qolşńrif Mosque was destroyed by Ivan the Terrible in 1522. The inauguration of the new building (pictured) in 2005 kicked off the millennium celebrations for which city of 1.1 million people that stands on the banks of the Volga? Hint

Kazan
Nizhny Novgorod
Volgograd
Yaroslavl

photo quiz
2. The Danube passes through many major cities on its way to the Black Sea. The picture shows the Hauptplatz (main square) in one of those cities, with its "Holy Trinity column" on the far right side. Which state capital of nearly 200,000 people, home to the world's oldest cake recipe, are we visiting? Hint

Vidin, Bulgaria
Ulm, Germany
Linz, Austria
Gyor, Hungary

photo quiz
3. The Rhine is one of the world's major north-flowing rivers. The Gothic-style Dom Tower (pictured) is the symbol of this city on the Rhine, and marks the location of the 1st-century Roman fortification around which the city developed. Which city is this, where the world's largest collection of medieval bells can still be heard today? Hint

Basel, Switzerland
Utrecht, Netherlands
DŘsseldorf, Germany
Strasbourg, France

photo quiz
4. The Elbe rises in Czech Republic and flows northwards across Germany to the sea. On the way it passes through the city of Dresden, nicknamed 'The Jewel Box' because of its baroque and rococo historic centre. The pictured building, built in the 19th century, stands close to the Elbe, but what is its function of this magnificent building?
Hint

Opera/Ballet house
State Legislature Building
Palace of Electors of Saxony
Art Museum

photo quiz
5. The Vistula flows 650 miles from the mountains in southern Poland to the Baltic Sea. The picture shows Długi Targ ("Long Market") and the 14th-century merchants' meeting place, Artus Court, which is the white building on the left. This is one of the most popular tourist destinations in which city, the largest in the metropolitan area known as 'Trˇjmiasto'? Hint

Wroclawek
Krakow
Gdansk
Warsaw

photo quiz
6. The River Tagus rises in Aragon in northeastern Spain and crosses Spain and Portugal enroute to the Atlantic Ocean. This city of 80,000 (2014 estimate) on the Tagus has a history of steel production and, particularly, making the finest swords going back to Roman times. The picture shows 'Santa MarÝa la Blanca', Europe's oldest surviving synagogue. Which city are we now visiting? Hint

Toledo
Abrantes
Lisbon
Santarem

photo quiz
7. The photograph shows the 15th century Ducal Palace, the oldest of the castles in the valley fed by this river. The castle overlooks the city of Nevers, capital of the former province of Nivernais. On which river, which rises in southern France and flows north then west to the Atlantic, does Nevers stand? Hint

Seine
Meuse
Rhone
Loire

photo quiz
8. The Gota alv and Klaralven river system, which flows into the Kattegat on Sweden's southwestern coast, is the longest in the Nordic countries. It begins its 460-mile journey to the sea from the European Union's largest lake (pictured). Formed at the end of the last ice age about 10,000 years ago, which lake is this? Hint

Lake Malaren
Lake Tornetrask
Lake Hjalmaren
Lake Vanern

photo quiz
9. The River Po flows 424 miles eastwards from the Italian Alps to the Adriatic Sea. The picture shows the Palantine Gate, one of the world's best-preserved Roman gateways from the 1st century B.C. You can visit this archaeological wonder in a city of 900,000 (2012 estimate) located mostly on the left bank of the Po. Which city is this, Italy's first capital when the country was unified in 1861? Hint

Milan
Ravenna
Venice
Turin

photo quiz
10. Rising in mid-Wales and flowing 220 miles east and south into the Bristol Channel, the River Severn is the longest in the U.K. The photograph shows the Cathedral Church of St Peter and the Holy and Indivisible Trinity, built close to the Severn on a site that was originally home to a 7th century abbey dedicated to Saint Peter. In which city, founded by the Romans in 97 A.D. as Colonia Glevum Nervensis, would you find this cathedral? Hint

Worcester
Welshpool
Gloucester
Shrewsbury


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Most Recent Scores
Aug 28 2023 : OldManOfTheSea: 6/10
Aug 27 2023 : maninmidohio: 10/10
Aug 24 2023 : Guest 193: 3/10

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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. We start our tour on Europe's longest river, the Volga. The original Qolşńrif Mosque was destroyed by Ivan the Terrible in 1522. The inauguration of the new building (pictured) in 2005 kicked off the millennium celebrations for which city of 1.1 million people that stands on the banks of the Volga?

Answer: Kazan

The Volga rises in the Valdai Hills between Saint Petersburg and Moscow. It flows in a generally southeastern direction for 2,294 miles before emptying into the Caspian Sea.

With a population of 1.14 million (2010 census), Kazan is the capital and largest city in the Republic of Tatarstan and Russia's eighth-largest city. The Kazan Kremlin, which now includes the new Qolşńrif Mosque, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Building began on the largest mosque in Europe outside Istanbul in 1996, and was completed in time to celebrate the city's 1,000th anniversary in 2005.

Officially nicknamed "The Third Capital of Russia", Kazan celebrates its "City Day" on August 30.
2. The Danube passes through many major cities on its way to the Black Sea. The picture shows the Hauptplatz (main square) in one of those cities, with its "Holy Trinity column" on the far right side. Which state capital of nearly 200,000 people, home to the world's oldest cake recipe, are we visiting?

Answer: Linz, Austria

The Danube rises in the Black Forest of Germany and travels eastwards for 1,777 miles to the Black Sea. On the way, it passes through four national capitals (Vienna, Bratislava, Belgrade and Budapest) as well as numerous state and provincial capitals and significant population centres.

With a population of 193,000 (2014 estimate), Linz is the capital and largest city in the state of Upper Austria, and the third-largest Austrian city. The city,founded as 'Lentia' by the Romans, straddles the Danube. The city's most famous resident was the mathematician and astronomer Jonathan Keppler, and the city's main university is named in his honour.

With a recipe dating back to 1653, the 'Linzer torte' claims the title of the world's oldest cake.
3. The Rhine is one of the world's major north-flowing rivers. The Gothic-style Dom Tower (pictured) is the symbol of this city on the Rhine, and marks the location of the 1st-century Roman fortification around which the city developed. Which city is this, where the world's largest collection of medieval bells can still be heard today?

Answer: Utrecht, Netherlands

The primary source of the River Rhine is Tomasee, a lake in the GraubŘnden canton of eastern Switzerland. From there, it flows primarily northwards for 764 miles to the North Sea.

Founded by the Romans around 50 A.D. and now home to some 330,000 (2014 estimate), Utrecht is the capital of the province of the same name and the fourth-largest city in The Netherlands.

Standing 368 feet tall, Dom Tower is the tallest church tower in the Netherlands. All that remains of the Cathedral of Saint Martin, the tower was built between 1331 and 1382 but the cathedral itself was still uncompleted when it collapsed in 1674. If you are feeling energetic, you can climb the 465 steps to the top of the tower for a spectacular panoramic view of the city and surrounding area.
4. The Elbe rises in Czech Republic and flows northwards across Germany to the sea. On the way it passes through the city of Dresden, nicknamed 'The Jewel Box' because of its baroque and rococo historic centre. The pictured building, built in the 19th century, stands close to the Elbe, but what is its function of this magnificent building?

Answer: Opera/Ballet house

The Elbe rises some 4,500 feet above sea level in the 'Krkonose' (aka "The Giant Mountains") in northern Czech Republic. After crossing first Bohemia and then Germany, the river empties into the North Sea some 70 miles north of Hamburg.

The city of Dresden is now the capital of the Free State of Saxony and was previously the historic seat of the Electors of Saxony. There is evidence of human habitation in the region for more than 9,000 years, but the current settlement dates back to the arrival of Slavic people in the 12th century.

The pictured 'Dresden Semperoper' was built in 1841 but a fire in 1869 virtually destroyed it. The magnificent opera and ballet house that can be seen today dates back to 1878. Composers whose works premiered here include Richard Wagner and Richard Strauss.
5. The Vistula flows 650 miles from the mountains in southern Poland to the Baltic Sea. The picture shows Długi Targ ("Long Market") and the 14th-century merchants' meeting place, Artus Court, which is the white building on the left. This is one of the most popular tourist destinations in which city, the largest in the metropolitan area known as 'Trˇjmiasto'?

Answer: Gdansk

The Vistula, Poland's longest river, rises on the western slopes of Barania Gˇra, a 4,000-foot high mountain in the Silesian Beskids in the extreme south of the country. It flows northwards 650 miles to the Bay of Gda˝sk, an inlet of the Baltic Sea.

The seaport of Gdansk (also sometimes called Danzig) is the capital of the Pomeranian Voivodeship. Poland's fourth-largest city, it is the largest city in the metropolitan area called Trˇjmiasto ("Tricity") which also includes the city of Gdynia and the spa town of Sopot.

Długi Targ was established in the 13th century, and many of the city's wealthiest merchants lived here. It was also the site for executions of common criminals, heretics and witches. Artus Court, completed in 1350, is now home to the Gdansk History Museum.
6. The River Tagus rises in Aragon in northeastern Spain and crosses Spain and Portugal enroute to the Atlantic Ocean. This city of 80,000 (2014 estimate) on the Tagus has a history of steel production and, particularly, making the finest swords going back to Roman times. The picture shows 'Santa MarÝa la Blanca', Europe's oldest surviving synagogue. Which city are we now visiting?

Answer: Toledo

The Tagus begins its 645-mile journey westwards from the Montes Universales in eastern Spain. It crosses central Spain and Portugal before emptying into the Atlantic Ocean near Lisbon.

Designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1986, the city of Toledo is the capital of both the Spanish province of the same name and the autonomous community of Castile-La Mancha. Nicknamed "The Imperial City" and "City of the Three Cultures", it is recognized today for its history as a producer of knives, swords and other bladed weapons.

Santa MarÝa la Blanca (Saint Mary the White), originally called Ibn Shushan Synagogue, was uniquely designed by Islamic architects for Jewish use under the auspices of the Christian Kingdom of Castile. Built in 1180 and now owned by the Catholic Church, it is arguably the oldest synagogue building still standing in Europe.
7. The photograph shows the 15th century Ducal Palace, the oldest of the castles in the valley fed by this river. The castle overlooks the city of Nevers, capital of the former province of Nivernais. On which river, which rises in southern France and flows north then west to the Atlantic, does Nevers stand?

Answer: Loire

The Loire Valley is often called "The Garden of France" because of the vast number of vineyards and fruit-producing fields that line its banks. Rising in the mountains of the Massif Central in southern France, the Loire flows 630 miles to the Atlantic Ocean and is the longest river in France.

The city of Nevers, administrative capital of the NiŔvre department in the Bourgogne region, began life in the 1st-century B.C. as the Roman settlement of Noviodunum.

Noted for its wide renaissance fašade and the polygon turrets typical of architecture found in the Loire Valley, the Ducal Palace that overlooks the historic old town in the centre of Nevers was the first of its kind.
8. The Gota alv and Klaralven river system, which flows into the Kattegat on Sweden's southwestern coast, is the longest in the Nordic countries. It begins its 460-mile journey to the sea from the European Union's largest lake (pictured). Formed at the end of the last ice age about 10,000 years ago, which lake is this?

Answer: Lake Vanern

Formed as an outflow channel from the Baltic Ice Lake at the end of the last Ice Age, the Gota alv ("River of the Geats") flows southwest from Lake Vanern, across southern Sweden, to enter the Kattegat near the country's second-largest city, Gothenburg.

With an area of 2,200 square miles, Lake Vanern is only slightly smaller than the U.S. state of Delaware. The largest lake in the European Union, only two Russian lakes (Ladoga and Onega) are larger and lie entirely within Europe. Located in southern Sweden, it covers parts of three provinces, Vastergotland, Dalsland and Varmland. The lake has an average depth of 89 feet and a maximum depth of 348 feet -- a Viking ship was discovered on the bottom of the lake only in 2009.
9. The River Po flows 424 miles eastwards from the Italian Alps to the Adriatic Sea. The picture shows the Palantine Gate, one of the world's best-preserved Roman gateways from the 1st century B.C. You can visit this archaeological wonder in a city of 900,000 (2012 estimate) located mostly on the left bank of the Po. Which city is this, Italy's first capital when the country was unified in 1861?

Answer: Turin

The River Po rises on the slopes of Monte Viso, the highest mountain in the Cottian Alps just on the Italian side of the border with France. The Po River Valley covers much of northern Italy, the river and its tributaries providing water for more than a third of the country's entire population.

Capital of the Piedmont region, Torino (Turin) has a rich historical and cultural background. Italy's first capital when the country unified in 1861, the city was also home to the House of Savoy, Italy's royal family until 1946. Major tourist attractions include the 17th-century Royal Palace, the 'Shroud of Turin' (housed at the royal chapel at the Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist in the centre of the city), and the 'Museo Nazionale dell'Automobile' ("The National Automobile Museum").

The Porta Palatina (Palatine Gate) once provided access through the city walls of Julia Augusta Taurinorum, the Roman settlement that became the city of Torino. The structure dates back to either the Augustan or the Flavian Age during the 1st-century B.C. Along with an ancient theatre located nearby, the gate forms the "Turin Archaeological Park" which opened in 2006.
10. Rising in mid-Wales and flowing 220 miles east and south into the Bristol Channel, the River Severn is the longest in the U.K. The photograph shows the Cathedral Church of St Peter and the Holy and Indivisible Trinity, built close to the Severn on a site that was originally home to a 7th century abbey dedicated to Saint Peter. In which city, founded by the Romans in 97 A.D. as Colonia Glevum Nervensis, would you find this cathedral?

Answer: Gloucester

The River Severn rises 2,000-feet up on the slopes of Plynlimon (meaning "five peaks"), the highest point in both the Cambrian Mountains and in mid-Wales. It eventually forms the Severn Estuary, which becomes the Bristol Channel as it flows out into the North Atlantic Ocean.

The city of Gloucester, founded by the Romans under Emperor Nerva, was granted its inaugural city charter by King Henry II in 1155.

The abbey, which once stood on the site now occupied by Gloucester Cathedral, was founded in the 670s and was dissolved by Henry VIII in the early 16th century. Construction of the cathedral itself, built in a combination of Romanesque and Gothic styles, began in 1089 during the reign of King William II. It took more than four centuries to complete -- it was finished in 1499.

The most notable monument here honours King Edward II (reigned 1307-27), who was murdered at the nearby Berkeley Castle and was subsequently buried in Gloucester.
Source: Author EnglishJedi

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor Tizzabelle before going online.
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