FREE! Click here to Join FunTrivia. Thousands of games, quizzes, and lots more!
Quiz about Bits and Pieces of Mississippi History
Quiz about Bits and Pieces of Mississippi History

Bits and Pieces of Mississippi History Quiz


There's no particular plan here, just a bunch of different questions about people and places in Mississippi's history.

A multiple-choice quiz by littlepup. Estimated time: 3 mins.
  1. Home
  2. »
  3. Quizzes
  4. »
  5. History Trivia
  6. »
  7. U.S. States & Cities
  8. »
  9. Mississippi

Author
littlepup
Time
3 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
383,905
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
229
Awards
Top 35% Quiz
Question 1 of 10
1. What tribe did Europeans NOT meet, when they first entered the area that would be Mississippi? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. One of the hungriest times in Mississippi's history was during the siege of this city in 1863, in the Civil War. Citizens and soldiers claimed to have survived eating mules and rats. What city was besieged? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. This guitarist was born on a cotton plantation in Mississippi and grew up to be considered the "King of the Blues," as he performed endlessly with his beloved guitar "Lucille"?
Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. What city in Mississippi claims to be where Memorial Day started, despite a city with the same name claiming the same thing nearby in Georgia? The city could also be named for the man who started to put the whole New World on the map
Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Probably the deadliest tornado cluster in the U.S. struck this Mississippi town the night of April 5-6, 1936. Among the survivors was one-year-old Elvis Presley. What was the town, which is also the name of a flowering tree? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. What Jackson, Mississippi author won the 1973 Pulitzer Prize for "The Optimist's Daughter," and is also known for her numerous short stories capturing southern life, such as "Why I Live at the P.O."?
Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. What flower or plant appears on the Mississippi coat of arms? It helped settle the state and made it rich. Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Brigadier General Pushmataha of the U.S. Army, a native of Mississippi, fought under a future President of the United States, helping him militarily, but later clashed with him politically. Who was the future President? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. In some decades, Mississippi's population more than doubled in size, according to the U.S. Census.


Question 10 of 10
10. Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederacy, lived after the war in a Biloxi, Mississippi, mansion whose name means "beautiful view" in French. What is it called? Hint



(Optional) Create a Free FunTrivia ID to save the points you are about to earn:

arrow Select a User ID:
arrow Choose a Password:
arrow Your Email:




Most Recent Scores
Jul 23 2024 : Guest 172: 6/10
Jun 29 2024 : Guest 104: 9/10

Score Distribution

quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. What tribe did Europeans NOT meet, when they first entered the area that would be Mississippi?

Answer: Hopi

The Mound Builders had come and gone, leaving behind only earthworks and evidence of their large civilization. When Europeans came, they met the tribes above, plus the Biloxi, Yazoo and Pascagoula, but not the Hopi, who were further west.
2. One of the hungriest times in Mississippi's history was during the siege of this city in 1863, in the Civil War. Citizens and soldiers claimed to have survived eating mules and rats. What city was besieged?

Answer: Vicksburg

The city of Vicksburg was on high ground and well fortified, but couldn't withstand a siege forever. After more than a month, the city surrendered July 4, 1863, giving Union troops unobstructed control of the Mississippi River. Meanwhile, Union soldiers defeat Confederates and turned them back south at the Battle of Gettysburg in Pennsylvania.

The two losses, though far from each other geographically, were a combined crushing blow to the Confederacy.
3. This guitarist was born on a cotton plantation in Mississippi and grew up to be considered the "King of the Blues," as he performed endlessly with his beloved guitar "Lucille"?

Answer: B. B. King

How can you pick just one native Mississippian who made a mark on the world of music? I chose at random among the greats, because the state has produced so many. B. B. King (1925-2015) was born at Berclair, Mississippi, and though he traveled and lived many places, he is buried at the museum that bears his name in Indianola, Mississippi. Among countless honors, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987, was ranked 6 on "Rolling Stone's" list of greatest guitarists of all time, and performed at the White House at age 86.
4. What city in Mississippi claims to be where Memorial Day started, despite a city with the same name claiming the same thing nearby in Georgia? The city could also be named for the man who started to put the whole New World on the map

Answer: Columbus

Dozens of places claim to be where the first Decoration Day took place, the holiday which became modern Memorial Day. Some of the claims are stronger than others. Women in Columbus, Mississipi, which had been full of hospitals during the war, gathered in 1866 to decorate both Union and Confederate graves. Judge F. M. Finch, a northerner who happened to witness the ceremony, wrote a poem about it for the "Atlantic Monthly", and local historians point out that that spread information on the celebration far outside the local area.
5. Probably the deadliest tornado cluster in the U.S. struck this Mississippi town the night of April 5-6, 1936. Among the survivors was one-year-old Elvis Presley. What was the town, which is also the name of a flowering tree?

Answer: Tupelo

The main tornado has been estimated to be an F5. The winds destroyed 200 homes in 48 city blocks, with a death toll of 233, which might actually be higher due to poor record-keeping in black neighborhoods, and of course many more people were injured. Elvis Presley had been born there the year before.
6. What Jackson, Mississippi author won the 1973 Pulitzer Prize for "The Optimist's Daughter," and is also known for her numerous short stories capturing southern life, such as "Why I Live at the P.O."?

Answer: Eudora Welty

Eudora Welty, born April 13, 1909 in Jackson, Mississippi, lived there all her life and died there July 23, 2001. Her home has been made into a museum. Aside from her writing, she has been recognized for her talent as a photographer also.
7. What flower or plant appears on the Mississippi coat of arms? It helped settle the state and made it rich.

Answer: Two cotton stalks

The coat of arms includes an eagle, a shield, banners with the word Mississippi and the state motto, and also "two branches of the cotton stalk," according to the original 1894 description. The Magnolia is the state flower and tree, but doesn't fit with the hint in the question, about making the state rich. Mississippi flourished economically when cotton was king.

The state motto on the banner is "Virtute et Armis," Latin for "By valor and arms."
8. Brigadier General Pushmataha of the U.S. Army, a native of Mississippi, fought under a future President of the United States, helping him militarily, but later clashed with him politically. Who was the future President?

Answer: Andrew Jackson

Pushmataha (1760s-1824) was also chief of one of the three branches of the Choctaws. He gained his brevet rank under General Jackson in the War of 1812, but in peacetime he was known as a skillful negotiator, and faced off against Jackson on the question of land treaties.

He died in Washington, D.C. where he was buried with military honors in the Congressional Cemetery. He was on another trip to take part in yet more negotiations, when he fell ill.
9. In some decades, Mississippi's population more than doubled in size, according to the U.S. Census.

Answer: true

In its early years, Mississippi's population grew quickly. Between 1800 and 1810, 1810 and 1820, and 1830 and 1840, the population more than doubled. Some of the earlier growth may have been due to boundary changes, but boundaries were pretty well settled later, and people just wanted to settle in the state, in hopes of getting rich on the fertile soil, or because they were enslaved and had no choice.
10. Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederacy, lived after the war in a Biloxi, Mississippi, mansion whose name means "beautiful view" in French. What is it called?

Answer: Beauvoir

Beauvoir has been hammered by hurricanes, but still stands after much repairwork, and is open to the public as a museum and presidential library. It was built in 1850. Davis lived there from 1879 until his death ten years later, though his wife preferred city living and moved to New York City after her husband died.
Source: Author littlepup

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
Any errors found in FunTrivia content are routinely corrected through our feedback system.
7/24/2024, Copyright 2024 FunTrivia, Inc. - Report an Error / Contact Us