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Quiz about London in the 14th Century
Quiz about London in the 14th Century

London in the 14th Century Trivia Quiz


In the 14th century London and its adjacent town, Westminster, was the largest, the richest, the most powerful, the most polluted, and the most violent city in England. What sights might a visitor of that time have seen?

A multiple-choice quiz by Calpurnia09. Estimated time: 3 mins.
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Author
Calpurnia09
Time
3 mins
Type
Multiple Choice
Quiz #
326,119
Updated
Dec 03 21
# Qns
10
Difficulty
Average
Avg Score
8 / 10
Plays
1834
Awards
Top 10% Quiz
Last 3 plays: Guest 71 (9/10), jibberer (9/10), pehinhota (10/10).
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Question 1 of 10
1. London Bridge, which connects the north and south banks of the Thames, was one of the engineering marvels of the capital. As well as a roadway what else did the bridge house? Hint


Question 2 of 10
2. One of the most beautiful buildings in the city was Bishop of London's church. It was the predecessor of the one that Christopher Wren designed. What was its name? Hint


Question 3 of 10
3. William the Conqueror built the first structure, the White Tower, in this famous edifice that still attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors. It has housed many important prisoners, but in the 14th century was a royal residence in London. What was it known as? Hint


Question 4 of 10
4. In the 14th century London was a walled city. Who built the original walls in about the 2nd century? Hint


Question 5 of 10
5. Just outside the city walls, but still considered part of the city, was the area of Smithfield. What knightly contests might a 14th century visitor have seen there? Hint


Question 6 of 10
6. In the 14th century this palace, on the north bank of the Thames, contained the main chambers of government: the Painted Chamber, the White Chamber and the Marcolf Chamber, which were the rooms where Parliament met. What was it called? Hint


Question 7 of 10
7. What well known London church is the place where virtually all English monarchs have been crowned from the time of the William the Conqueror, the Norman conquest? Hint


Question 8 of 10
8. Most cities and towns in medieval times executed their criminals outside the gates, but in London executions took place at the junction of two major roads. What was this site called? Hint


Question 9 of 10
9. Along the Strand, the thoroughfare which then had a panoramic view of the river, were the most beautiful and prestigious houses in the city. Which son of Edward III, who ruled for Richard II when he was young, lived in the mansion called the Savoy? Hint


Question 10 of 10
10. The Southwark Stews were a tourist attraction of a different kind. There was little or no stigma attached to the men who frequented this area. What activity took place there? Hint



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quiz
Quiz Answer Key and Fun Facts
1. London Bridge, which connects the north and south banks of the Thames, was one of the engineering marvels of the capital. As well as a roadway what else did the bridge house?

Answer: All of these

London Bridge had nineteen huge arches spanning the Thames. The surface was twenty eight feet wide with buildings taking up seven feet on either side. These were cantilevered a further seven feet out over the river. Merchants had their dwelling places above the shops.

The chapel, halfway along the bridge, was dedicated to St Thomas. At the southern end of the bridge there was a drawbridge that could be raised to prevent access to the city by enemies.
2. One of the most beautiful buildings in the city was Bishop of London's church. It was the predecessor of the one that Christopher Wren designed. What was its name?

Answer: St Paul's Cathedral

Construction of (fourth) St Paul's Cathedral was started in the 12th century and was finished in 1314. It was the most impressive cathedral in the country and at 585 feet long was the third longest in Christendom. It had a towering spire 489 feet tall, taller than that of Salisbury Cathedral and surpassed only by that of the Lincoln Cathedral.

Its most notable features, however, were the magnificent rose window at the eastern end and its beautiful chapter house, the meeting room for the bishop and priests.
3. William the Conqueror built the first structure, the White Tower, in this famous edifice that still attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors. It has housed many important prisoners, but in the 14th century was a royal residence in London. What was it known as?

Answer: The Tower of London

Most of the visible parts of the Tower, including the moat, were built in the 13th century. By the 14th century it had changed from being primarily a defensive structure to a royal palace which included a great hall, royal solar (private living room) and a multitude of other chambers necessary for the maintenance of the royal court and its staff.

In addition, the tower housed the royal mint, a royal library and the royal menagerie, which held a collection of lions, leopards and other big cats.
4. In the 14th century London was a walled city. Who built the original walls in about the 2nd century?

Answer: The Romans

The original walls were built by the Romans to protect their city, Londinium. In the 14th century they were an amazing sight, being eighteen feet high and six to nine feet thick. There were seven great gatehouses: Ludgate, Newgate, Aldersgate, Cripplegate, Bishopsgate, Aldgate and Bridgegate, which led on to London Bridge. Each gate had massive oak doors which were secured at night by heavy drawbars.

In times of war the whole city could be defended as if it were a huge castle.
5. Just outside the city walls, but still considered part of the city, was the area of Smithfield. What knightly contests might a 14th century visitor have seen there?

Answer: Jousts and tournaments

Jousts and tournaments were popular entertainments as well as providing military training for those taking part. Smithfield was also the site of the main meat market for London. A popular gathering place, it was the site of the three day fair which was held to celebrate St Bartholomew's Day (24th August).
6. In the 14th century this palace, on the north bank of the Thames, contained the main chambers of government: the Painted Chamber, the White Chamber and the Marcolf Chamber, which were the rooms where Parliament met. What was it called?

Answer: Westminster Palace

The ancient great hall, site of many feasts, was built in the 11th century. In the 14th century Richard II replaced the old twin aisle layout with an incredible single span roof. This was one of the greatest carpentry achievements of any age. As well as the government chambers here, too, were various private royal residences while across the courtyard stood a belltower which had hanging within it 'The Edward', a four ton bell which was the forerunner of Big Ben.
7. What well known London church is the place where virtually all English monarchs have been crowned from the time of the William the Conqueror, the Norman conquest?

Answer: Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey is still one of the most important Gothic buildings in the country. In the 13th century, on the instructions of Henry III, it was almost entirely rebuilt at a cost of more than 41,000, making it the second most expensive building in medieval England.

Henry III and other monarchs of the time were buried there. It had beautiful wall paintings (some of which can still be seen) and contained the shrine of Edward the Confessor, plated with gold and encrusted with precious jewels.
8. Most cities and towns in medieval times executed their criminals outside the gates, but in London executions took place at the junction of two major roads. What was this site called?

Answer: Tyburn

A gallows stood permanently at Tyburn where Tyburn Road and Watling Street met under the tall elm trees near the Tyburn stream. Executions took place there almost every day as the rate of violent crime in the capital was high. Executions always attracted an audience and the best attended were those of high-ranking traitors, such as Roger Mortimer in 1330.

His naked body was left hanging on the gallows for two days.
9. Along the Strand, the thoroughfare which then had a panoramic view of the river, were the most beautiful and prestigious houses in the city. Which son of Edward III, who ruled for Richard II when he was young, lived in the mansion called the Savoy?

Answer: John of Gaunt

Although there were other palaces in London, the best postion to live was on The Strand because it had access to the historic waterway of the Thames and was at a distance from the crime, insanitary conditions, appalling smells and the threat of fire that existed in the city itself. Edward III, whose reign made England the greatest military power in Europe, lived there in his youth.

His son, John of Gaunt, made it into the most spectacular townhouse in the country. It was burnt down during the Peasant's Revolt in revenge for the poll tax that John of Gaunt was blamed for imposing.
10. The Southwark Stews were a tourist attraction of a different kind. There was little or no stigma attached to the men who frequented this area. What activity took place there?

Answer: Prostitution

Stews were another name for bath houses. In the 14th century prostitution was forbidden in London, except in one street, amusingly named Cock Lane. Here men could eat, drink, have a hot scented bath and spend time in female company. In 1374 there were 18 establishments, all run by Flemish women.

At this time there were few sexually transmitted diseases and fidelity in marriage was only required of the wife. Most of the properties there were rented from the Bishop of Winchester.
Source: Author Calpurnia09

This quiz was reviewed by FunTrivia editor bloomsby before going online.
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